Point but don’t shoot: Districts allow seniors to pose with their guns in yearbook photos

These are the sorts of yearbook photos that used to be standard. Now, students want to personalize the shots and show some of their favorite things, including their hunting rifles.

These are the sorts of yearbook photos that used to be standard. Now, students want to personalize the shots and show some of their favorite things, including their hunting rifles.

These are the sorts of yearbook photos that used to be standard. Now, students want to personalize their photos and show some of their favorite things, including their hunting rifles.

I was unaware of the trend of allowing students to pose with props in their senior class photos, including firearms. Most of the yearbooks I’ve seen mandate the traditional headshots.

But apparently districts in rural regions of the country with hunting cultures are permitting students to pose with their hunting rifles, including Broken Bow Schools in Nebraska where the school board just voted to allow seniors to do so if the photos are tasteful.

The rationale is that athletes pose with footballs and band members pose with musical instruments. However, you could argue there’s a difference in footballs and French horns — those props have some connection with schools. Students don’t usually bring their guns to school. (A few states have high school shooting leagues but it’s not widespread.)

Teens are big hunters in the Nebraska district, and the area is a hunting mecca. The request for guns in photos came from parents.

Here is a link to a story in the Omaha World-Herald where the superintendent explains, “The board I believe felt they wanted to give students who are involved in those kinds of things the opportunity to take a senior picture with their hobby, with their sport, just like anybody with any other hobby or sport.”

(If you go to the World-Herald story, you will see examples of the yearbook photos of the students.)

A school board member told the paper, “For me as a sportsman, I think the policy’s important because it allows those kids who are doing those things a chance to demonstrate what they’re doing and to celebrate that. I think that’s important and fair in our country.”

 

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28 comments
Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

Ah yes, a picture of a student partaking in a pasttime that MILLIONS of law abiding citizens participate every year. Additionally, those students could probably teach the politically correct educrats in other parts of the country a thing or two about the Second Amendment and why we have the "right to keep and bear arms".

Enjoy it while it lasts.  Probably wont be long before one of those sickly looking vegans from PETA show up and act all "offended".

Motheroftwins
Motheroftwins

just looked at a couple yearbooks. Lots of photos of fish that were caught, several pictures of kids/families in camouflage, a couple of photos with crossbows, but no actual guns in any of the pictures. Not sure if they were prohibited.

Motheroftwins
Motheroftwins

Interesting. My kids' yearbook had very specific guidelines for the senior photo. Everyone wore the exact same thing - faux tux for the boys and a black wrap for the girls. Same background on every photo. The kids could purchase a candid page - for a small fortune. These pages had the kids posing with friends, family, sports paraphernalia, musical instruments, etc. I don't recall seeing guns or dead animals, but I imagine that the kids who hunt had photos related to their specific sport. The candid photos were sent online, and I expect that a school representative approved the pictures. I honestly can't remember anything remotely objectionable. I'm going to have to take another look at the yearbooks.

FIGMO2
FIGMO2

Freedom of expression.

Here at the AJC blogs, we participate in it everyday.

consumedconsumer
consumedconsumer

Well, now some of you got kids in school with guns. Happy now?

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

As to the school board member:  What if the young person is a stripper, or a burglar?  Want them to celebrate that in the annual?  How about posing with all their children born out of wedlock?  Or their pet?


Having a gun is not illegal, but really, what is the point in yearbook pictures?

Astropig
Astropig

@Wascatlady 

" Having a gun is not illegal, but really, what is the point in yearbook pictures?"

To recognize a diverse student body?


As to your question about strippers and burglars, I'm pretty sure those are illegal activities for high school kids.And kids born out of wedlock are already getting their mugs included in yearbooks.(see below).

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

Real, real classy.  Georgia is next!  I can see our legislature wasting time on it now!

Astropig
Astropig

@consumedconsumer @Astropig 

The article makes it pretty clear that these photos are being taken off campus,in a photographers studio and he makes sure the guns are unloaded.

So far, none of the students have been pictured with a Pop Tart.

Astropig
Astropig

@Wascatlady 

"  I can see our legislature wasting time on it now!"

I'm just curious; What exactly would the legislature have to do with high school yearbook photos? Would they pass a "Yearbooks Everywhere" law? Institute a 3 day waiting period (and background check) for yearbook purchasers? Ban felons from buying yearbooks?


You just kind of lost me.

dcdcdc
dcdcdc

off topic - sorry - but don't know of another way to get this to you, Maureen.  Ran across another interesting article today, talking about the positive impact that paying outstanding teachers outstanding salaries is making in a NYC charter.  At least on the surface, appears to show what a dramatic difference outstanding teachers truly can make.  Warning though...it mentions Bill and Melinda Gates, which I realize to many in the eduacracy is like saying "The Koch Brothers" to (D)s.....:)


http://online.wsj.com/articles/charter-school-study-finds-high-teacher-pay-helps-students-1414123264?mod=WSJ_hps_sections_newyork

Bearhand
Bearhand

If the pictures aren't taken on school grounds, I don't see the problem.

straker
straker

Would you like to know the real reason these "sportsmen" want to pose with their guns"?


Well, let's just say their guns are a substitute for a physical and/or emotional lacking.

class80olddog
class80olddog

Why stop there - why not allow sexting pictures...

scrappy-22
scrappy-22

Taken in context of where this high school is, and the students, and the photos are not taken on school grounds, and they will be considering the photos on a case by case basis.... I have no problem with it.  This is considered sport, even if you can't earn a varsity letter.  

Would it work in other places? Probably not.  

EdUktr
EdUktr

In many parts of Atlanta the prison culture is strong, and we allow children to celebrate it by sagging their pants.

How is this then any different?

robertbyrd
robertbyrd

@consumedconsumer @EdUktr  I would say edUktr was right.  We are reading about someone getting a picture taken with a long rifle and seeing negative comments about it.  Yet we never seem to read about the problem of a certain segment of society that thinks getting educated is "acting white".

Starik
Starik

It's a slippery slope, that's why. Next they'll be posing with their cellphones.

Frankie581000
Frankie581000

So Maureen, what is the purpose of this story...

Tcope
Tcope

Just don't point that yearbook at another student or you will be expelled! Don't forget North Atlanta High School has a shooting range in the basement.

Astropig
Astropig

It's a  picture of a gun.  No harm, no foul.

dcdcdc
dcdcdc

@Astropig eeek, run and hide (while screaming like a little girl).  Sad how society has gone so wacky about pictures.....