Dress codes for female teachers: ‘Their clothing seems to be more important than their teaching skills.’

Rouhollah Aghasaleh is a doctoral candidate in educational theory and practice at the University of Georgia and co-founder of Feminist Scholar-Activists.

He titled this piece: “Dress Codes for Future Teachers; A Middle Eastern Observation on American Teacher Education.”

On the issue of teacher dress codes, I’ve been surprised at the attention to what female teachers wear and the limits placed on them. A neighbor who taught pre-k was advised once by a principal to wear dress pumps rather than flats even though she spent her day keeping up with 4-year-olds. Another teacher told me her principal suggested female teachers wear dresses rather than slacks.

By Rouhollah Aghasaleh

Everybody stand up! Stretch your arms! If you see any skin revealed from your belly then what you’re wearing is inappropriate. Bend over! If your back shows at all, then what you’re wearing is inappropriate. You shouldn’t wear short skirts!

bathing

Photo from Library of Congress

Don’t think these words were said by ISIS in Iraq, Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan, or Boko Haram in Nigeria. These words were said by a white well-educated instructor at a secular public university in a so-called first world liberal country. These words were meant to awaken teacher candidates and let them know they shouldn’t take their bodies to their classrooms.

If you travel to my country, Iran, before you get off the plane and inhale some fresh Iranian air, something slams in your face. A member of the revolutionary guard gets on the plane and passes out head-scarfs to women who have not covered their hair yet. She does this with a big smile if you do not look like an Iranian lady.

The Iranian Guardian Council Chair last year declared the new government ought to take women’s dress code more seriously. This senior cleric stated that it would be easier for the government to control its female employees, who get paid out of the public budget, than to control women more generally. He also added university faculty should consider this issue as part of their course evaluations and grades for female students.

I was reminded of this on my first day of serving as a teacher candidate supervisor in a Southern state, attending one of our teacher candidates’ orientations. In the meeting, teacher candidates, who will spend a good part of the next two years in schools participating in field experiences, were bombarded by instructions mostly having to do with disciplinary issues, seductively polished as “Professionalism.”

A good part of this professionalism was about disciplining bodies through dress code; and of course the body that needs to be more controlled is the woman’s body. Interestingly, as a supervisor, one of the criteria I am supposed to consider in my evaluation of the field experience students is to see if they have been able to discipline their bodies through dressing “appropriately.”

Talking to my students, I was surprised to realize our policy is more conservative than school district own policies for teacher dress. This policy has been adopted for teacher candidates’ own “good,” said one of the experienced supervisors. Living in the South, the supervisor said teacher candidates might not be able to find a teaching job if they don’t honor the community’s values and culture.

As an educator, I always ask myself how much we should adjust our pedagogy to the current community values and how much we should push to make a difference. Do we have to adjust our pedagogy to the community’s values and culture if we live in a racist/ sexist/ homophobic community?

What commitment does our teacher education program have to create a better place for women to live?

Women represent the overwhelming majority of teachers in U.S. schools. Despite the feminization of the teaching profession, the female body in a school environment is still a matter of “objectification.’’

Female teachers’ bodies matter before the quality of their teaching, and their clothing seems to be more important than their teaching skills.

If you’ve lived long enough you may remember the time that police measured women’s swimming suits on the beach to make sure there was not excessive amount of body appearing.

This may sound ridiculous now, but the hem-measuring picture with this essay is very similar to what we practice nowadays in our teacher education programs.

Program coordinators, senior faculty, and teacher supervisors I have talked to agree on a couple points. They had not thought about the dress code policy as a gendered issue. They always assumed this is about being professional.

When I shared a note in which I compared these dress code policies to Iranian dress code policy, my colleagues were offended because I was not supposed to compare U.S. liberal democracy to a theological totalitarian regime. They thought they have such a respect for women and don’t discriminate against them whereas the Islamic regime is obviously oppressive toward women.

As long as women are objectified as sexual bodies to be controlled rather than as intellectuals, there is no wonder why the state of Georgia is ranked the 41st best state for women to live and why the U.S. is not one of the 71 countries in the world that has had a female president or prime minister.

In fact, the United States ranks 97th for number of women in national government where women comprise only 20 percent of Congress.

Colleges of education are places where many women are educated across Georgia and the country as a whole. Teacher educators can decide to continue practices, such as strict “dress codes,” that perpetuate ideas of sexism and the control of women, or they can consider those practices within a global context of oppression against women.

Doing the latter could open up new possibilities for the empowerment of women in Georgia.

Reader Comments 0

69 comments
maeastman
maeastman

I believe it Teachers should be able to wear what they want when they want as long as they feel comfortable in It. As long as the skirts and dresses are appropriate length they should be able to wear it without getting harassed

Glenu
Glenu

Well, belatedly here's what I think. The author is mistaken if he feels he is speaking on "professionalism" The article takes on the subject of "taste" as in "good taste". Of course, 'good taste' is regional as well as international. What is consider "good taste" in one region will not necessarily be considered the same in another. If NY teachers come in with pants, sweat shirts & sneakers, that may be considered within an acceptable range but don't tell me a female instructor can arrive in an "bondage outfit" or a "roller derby uniform" complete with roller skates & not be sent packing. Perhaps in the southern California or Miami area more beach type clothing would be considered acceptable including flip flops and perhaps a pinch of skin here & there but I'm sure one would not be met with favor clothed in a bikini with nipple piercing as a top. So a little education about regionalism taste for  future teachers seems appropriate.. The object lesson seems to be- to put one in a position to teach rather than be stared at. Fashion trends are best left to "professionals" of a separate field.

What is bothersome to me about the article is the author seems to be implying that if a specific education dept. spends time on informing of an alleged "dress code" then he or she cannot perform the intellectual duties required of a teacher in that particular region. He goes on to list where the state of Georgia is ranked educationally in relation to the nation and where the United States ranks in the world. I would hope our young graduating female teachers would not be too stymied by this rather inane obstacle and go on to become the best teachers they can be and if desired become leaders of both their communities and the nation.

50Concept
50Concept

most of my teachers were fat or not very hot---only a couple of teachers wore some tight or short stuff---i didn't mind.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

I believe my remarks to a poster below need to be restated here:


This is what the article was about.  Fourth paragraph from the bottom of the article:

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


"As long as women are objectified as sexual bodies to be controlled rather than as intellectuals, there is no wonder why the state of Georgia is ranked the 41st best state for women to live


and why the U.S. is not one of the 71 countries in the world that has had a female president or prime minister."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Think about what Rouhollah Aghasaleh is exploring beyond how much skin is shown or how much skin is covered.  This article reaches deeper than simply sexual connotations.  Mr. Aghasaleh, imo, is reaching deep to explore gender bias toward women both in parts of the MIddle East, as well as in the United States, which I believe you have missed understanding.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Ann Inquirer 

I resent this anti-Islam post, which assumes that all  Muslims follow fundamentalist Sharia law. This is like assuming that all Christians follow Amish law. Don't post this sort of intolerant, hate-filled stuff on an Education blog, where the readers are likely to be more tolerant and also to teach diverse children in their classrooms. (The Sharia garment is spelled "burka" or "burqua," btw.).

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@Ann Inquirer 

LOL, that is funny.  It is also ironic that an Iranian is "co-founder of the FEMINIST SCHOLAR ACTIVISTS", whatever the hell that is supposed to be.

.

Here's a tip, when you recieve an application for a job and the job seeker lists membership in the Feminist Scholar Activist, toss it in the trash can.  Save yourself a lot of headaches.

.

popacorn
popacorn

LOL! I'd rather you didn't post, 'professor'. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@BurroughstonBroch @OriginalProf @Ann Inquirer 

The above essay by  Rouhollah Aghasaleh, now a doctoral candidate in educational theory and practice at the University of Georgia, has nothing at all to do with Sharia law. The post by Ann Inquirer does not discuss this posted essay, but rather seems a bigoted, contemptible attack upon him as a Muslim. 

How's that?

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

@OriginalProf @BurroughstonBroch @Ann Inquirer  Ann Inquirer's post contains typical examples of Sharia law as applied to women. Why is this a bigoted, contemptible attack on a Muslim? Stating the truth is bigoted and contemptible?

Refute the examples Ann Inquirer posted, if you can.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@OriginalProf


"As such, I resist the post's blanket condemnation of all followers of Islam."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


As would most well-educated people.

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

@OriginalProf @Ann Inquirer  Sharia law is public law in Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Brunei, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan and Mauritania. Majority sentiment among Muslims in other Muslim-majority countries is to convert public law to Sharia law. Your attempt to minimize the sway of Sharia law doesn't hold water.

Why don't you refute what the post above says, if you can.

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

@MaryElizabethSings @OriginalProf  You portray your opinions as typical of most well-educated people with a condescending attitude and no evidence to support your opinions. It's exactly what I experience from most retired educators.

Since neither of you has refuted the points in Ann Inquirer's post, this well-educated person considers you have failed.

popacorn
popacorn

As a rule, teachers are not very educated. 

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

@popacorn  In my experience, they are educated in how their university instructors say they should teach, but are uneducated in almost every other field. If you doubt this, just look at the curricula for a BSEd.

By the way, many of the university education instructors have never taught outside a university environment. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@BurroughstonBroch 


I earned my BA in English (not English education) from The City College of New York.  I never took an education course in college until I earned my Masters' degree as a certified Reading Specialist, grades 1 - 12, in the state of Georgia, which required a detailed practicum in teaching actual reading students with success, based on pretest and posttest reading scores.

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

@MaryElizabethSings @BurroughstonBroch  You are anomaly of the past, sad to say. CCNY had and still has a fine academic program I respect. Unfortunately, most public school educators today take a BSEd degree which is filled with education courses. Even if they focus on mathematics, the math courses are taught by education instructors, not math instructors.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@BurroughstonBroch 


I actually spent more quarters at NYU than I did at CCNY.  I earned all As in my English courses at both of these outstanding universities. The first is a private university, and the second one is a public university. While taking courses in the evenings at NYU, I worked during the days in the Vice President's office of NYU, which paid for my tuition there.  Once, I started attending full time, I needed to transfer to the public university for financial reasons.


My education as an educator may be an anomaly of the past, but I did teach through 2006, and I respected the work of many, many teachers during my long teaching career.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@BurroughstonBroch @OriginalProf @popacorn 

I have to wonder, then, how your wife and children take your earlier comment: "In my experience, [teachers] are educated in how their university instructors say they should teach, but are uneducated in almost every other field. If you doubt this, just look at the curricula for a BSEd."  This is a blanket condemnation of all educators, without exceptions.  And popacorn's routine sniping at all teachers also is therefore aimed at them.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@BurroughstonBroch @popacorn 

And just what is your experience? How familiar are you with actual, flesh-and-blood faculty, especially those outside the field of Education? I believe you once mentioned that your career has been in business. Do you personally know educators outside that field, or are you just making a casual observation here?


I myself have my B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in "content" fields, and have never taken an Education course.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@BurroughstonBroch @OriginalProf @Ann Inquirer 

But I reject her initial premise: that the essay is an attempt at "Islamic indoctrination." It is not.  It relates solely to American dress codes for teachers. Ann Inquirer's implication is that because the essayist is Muslim (an unsupported assumption, since he does not state this anywhere but is Iranian with a Middle Eastern name) his points are attempts at such indoctrination, which is insulting to him.


Moreover, Sharia law varies according to the Muslim country. "Rape" and "wife-beating" are not characteristic of Sharia law as practiced in all such countries.  This too is insulting.


This post is part of the general anti-Muslim sentiment sweeping the country right now, due of course to our fighting ISIS in the Middle East that practices an extreme version of Sharia law. As such, I resist the post's blanket condemnation of all followers of Islam.



DixieDiarist
DixieDiarist

HOT LUNCH


I had to hand out cheeseburgers and chips in the kitchen today during lunch. A local caterer brings the food and we heat it up and hand it out. If you want lunch it costs five dollars. Sometimes we get spaghetti. It’s real good.


A huge, nine foot tall woman with hair like a bale of briars, who came in to substitute for Miss Manhater, walked in and asked if she could have a cheeseburger and a bag of chips.


I said sure. Welcome aboard, by the way.


She reached into her cavernous cleavage and pulled out a wad of money. 


I gave it to her for free.


****


Todd’s teaching memoir, “Can’t Wait to Get There. Can’t Wait to Leave,” at corkscrew turns hilarious, heartwarming, and sometimes heartbreaking, will be published in January by Stairway Press.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

In my 41 years in education, I have known 2 women who dressed inappropriately.  Both are still teaching. One has toned down, the other continues to look ridiculous and seems to deliberately provoke "feelings" in the 5th-6th grade boys she teaches.  If she only realized how stupid she looks--a 45 year old woman made up to be a pole dancer, with Dolly Parton hair and bust and very short skirts and very high heels.  I have been surprised that the several principals under whom she has worked (some female) have not put a stop to it, but she also wields a mean shotgun!

concernedoldtimer
concernedoldtimer

After several years working with young teachers as I finished my career.....young teachers, many of them do need help in how to dress professionally for work.

HowdyJune
HowdyJune

Teachers should set an example to include looking and acting professional.  Students take their cue from teachers and they learn more than just what in books or what appears on the board.  When I taught in college, we formed an industry advisory board who members frequently sat in on the classes I taught.  At the beginning of each semester, I reminded the students of this and you'd be surprised how many of those who watched their appearance were invited to interviews.  


Preparing for an interview ought to begin in high school and continue throughout college.  If someone look sharp, chances are that they are sharp and care about things other than their appearance.  And the opposite side of that coin is likewise true.


And it doesn't matter if your male or female.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@HowdyJune


That is because in the South (if you are from the South or Midwest), generally speaking, getting an education means getting prepared for the business world, which includes wearing the appropriate attire.  When I studied at NYC and CCNY, getting an education meant using your mind to think outside the box and to explore ideas of significance to the world and to its evolution in its ongoing history and destiny.  Having on just the right kind of shoes and make-up had little bearing to the understanding of those ideas and to how to think without stereotypical thoughts. Having everyone dress in the same "appropriate" way would, in fact, have been an anathema to those intellectual goals having been achieved.


I am sure that the university students who were observed by your "industry advisory board" looked "sharp" and were "sharp" (sounds like the words to a jingle for a TV commercial) in their interviews for a position in the business arena.  However,  the priority in my universities in NYC was in achieving more intellectual depth, and achieving that intellectual depth did not depend on one's attire.  

popacorn
popacorn

Achieving 'intellectual depth' does, however, require an IQ of 100 or above. Without that, you're just dumb enough to THINK you've achieved 'intellectual depth', a dangerously small mind-set present in so many educators, and on display often in this blog. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@HowdyJune 

Your experience teaching in college (where? how large was the college?  when? what was your field?) certainly differs from my four+ decades of teaching at the University level, in the North, in the upper South, and here in Georgia at a research university.  North or South, at the grad. student Instructor level or the Full Professor level, I do not remember ever encountering what you describe, and I am female. The focus in classes always was on the intellectual content being passed from teacher to student.


In general, the men have seemed to favor blue jeans and the women, either a deliberately unmatched suit or pants. Women usually didn't wear jeans, and as one of my female colleagues said: "Why waste a perfectly good jeans-feeling on a class?" I myself stopped wearing skirts for pants around 2000, and heels before that since they made my feet hurt.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@popacorn 

If you don't have an IQ of 100 or above, you're not gonna get into any universities in the first place.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

For at least 3 years I have been reading Get Schooled and have learned about aspects of K-12 life I never would have known about otherwise as a USG University professor....But a dress code for female teachers?  Really?  In 2014?

Astropig
Astropig

@OriginalProf


With the vast, overwhelming majority of school system employees being female,the premise here seems like an answer in search of a question.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

Oh good grief, if SOME of you female educators would cover your cleavage and not dress like you're on the prowl in a singles bar, we wouldn't HAVE to have this conversation.

Hint:  if the students are talking about your manner of dress rather than your lesson, you've probably carried your "look" a bit too far.  If they're tossing you Mardi Gras beads, you've definately carried it too far.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Lee_CPA2


Spoken like a true sexist.  I don't know any female educators who "dress(ed) like they were on the prowl in a singles bar."  Unreal perception in this day and age.  I would have been embarrassed to have posted such a post as this.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@MaryElizabethSings 

I guess @WasCatlady is a true sexist as well when she posted above:  "--a 45 year old woman made up to be a pole dancer, with Dolly Parton hair and bust and very short skirts and very high heels."

BTW, I'm not the one who needs to be embarrassed.  You should come see the principal at my wife's school.  So much for "leading by example", unless, of course, the example is "thank God for stretchy fabric...."

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Lee_CPA2 


Reread what you wrote and what WasCatlady wrote.  There is very much a difference in your thoughts. 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WasCatlady wrote, "In my 41 years in education, I have known 2 women who dressed inappropriately."


You wrote: "Oh good grief, if SOME of you female educators would cover your cleavage and not dress like you're on the prowl in a singles bar, we wouldn't HAVE to have this conversation."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


WasCatlady seemed to be saying that in her experience of teaching for 41 years, ONLY two teachers had dressed sexually inappropriately. 


On the other hand, you seemed to be implying that, in your opinion, there is a large number of teachers (not all, but some) who dress so sexual inappropriately that this conversation was needed.


I still maintain that your remarks were sexist, and I hope that you can now better see why.



Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@MaryElizabethSings

Nope.  All I see is that you went on the attack and started calling people names and then when you were called on it, you try to mush-mouth your way out of it.

As far as being a sexist, the THEME of this BLOG TOPIC was FEMALE DRESS CODES.  You cannot talk about female dress codes without talking about how females dress and if there wasn't a significant number of females that didn't dress inappropriately, there would be no reason to discuss FEMALE DRESS CODES.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Lee_CPA2 


"All I see is that you went on the attack and started calling people names and then when you were called on it, you try to mush-mouth your way out of it."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Ridiculous perception.  But, it is yours.  Maybe obtuseness and sexism and racism (no, I am not calling you a racist) go hand-in-hand.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Lee_CPA2 


This is what the article was about, Lee.  Fourth paragraph from the bottom of the article:

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

"As long as women are objectified as sexual bodies to be controlled rather than as intellectuals, there is no wonder why the state of Georgia is ranked the 41st best state for women to live


 and why the U.S. is not one of the 71 countries in the world that has had a female president or prime minister."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Think about what Rouhollah Aghasaleh is exploring beyond how much skin is shown or how much skin is covered.  This article reaches deeper than simply sexual connotations.  Mr. Aghasaleh, imo, is reaching deep to explore gender bias toward women both in parts of the MIddle East, as well as in the United States, which I believe you have missed understanding.

NewName
NewName

@MaryElizabethSings @Lee_CPA2 I hate to agree with the above and to rely on anecdotal evidence, but I can think of several outfits: a long denim shirt worn as a dress (wrinkled as all get out to boot), skin tight leggings w/ a waist length shirt and a shirt that exposed all of the top of the breast (except the nipples) on teachers at my school in the last 2 years. I am a proud woman and teacher and hate to see the profession denigrated by people who have no idea what professional dress is.

C. Diff
C. Diff

The teachers must 'dress appropriately' yet the students hide under 'hoodies' with their pant-waists about even with their private parts? Give me a break. Whats good for the goose . . . . 

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

Sure, there is a line between a professionally dressed person and a miniskirted, breast-revealed, over-made up streetwalker. 

Any hard and fast line will be mocked as "stringent" from full coverage of some Muslim cultures to the arms up/ bend over measurements. 


In the business world, there is a standard of "professional" attire that is differentiated from casual attire.  It's much easier on men, because of the attire choices.  Men: professional = business suit.  Casual = Slacks and collared shirt.  Women?  There is such a huge range of suits, dresses, skirts, stockings, leggings, blouses, camisoles, blazers, etc etc etc that any type of rule has to be vague.


For teachers, It comes down to "don't show your underwear, if you dare."  Attire should not be a distraction, but again, young people should be taught about proper behavior around anyone - even if they perceive that person is dressed inappropriately. 

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

I was talking about this piece with two young adults, one of whom recently finished law school and one in a medical residency. They said instruction on how to dress that included commands to "bend over" or "stretch your arms" would never be tolerated by students in medical or law school.

Why is this appropriate for teachers in training?


popacorn
popacorn

Absolutely, medical school....teacher school. What's the difference?

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@MaureenDowney


I think that the law and medical professions have had a long history of being male-dominated, until the last few decades.  On the other hand, the teaching profession has had a long history of being female-dominated.


It often takes generations to overcome the paternalism shown toward women throughout the world's history, except in rare cases.  Women, as a group, are just beginning to make dramatic inroads in changing this inequity of vision toward women. Women are fully equal to men, especially in leadership, creative, and intellectual abilities.  Perhaps, if former U. S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is elected as America's first female President, the people of this world will more quickly start to see that some women are superior to some men, just as other groups of various demarcations have people who are superior to others within.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

Rouhollah Aghasaleh is a true intellectual,  He is very much on target in his thesis.


Here is my testimony to prove it:  I graduated from college in New York City in January of 1970 and, then, I headed immediately back to my Georgia roots to begin my teaching career in South Georgia.


What a culture shock related to the dress code for female teachers I experience from NYC to South Georgia. Female teachers in Georgia could wear only pants suits, not slacks, because our hips had to be fully covered, with an extra layer of jacket cloth, which we could not remove regardless of how hot it got in South Georgia.  That is only one example of rigid dress codes for women in Georgia in 1970.  More priority was placed on looking professional than on the intellectual heft of the teacher.  The opposite was true in NYC, where female teachers often came to class in slacks, flats, no make-up and unruly hair.  Male teachers often taught in jeans and no ties, but these teachers knew their intellectual stuff, and they knew how to communicate their knowledge to students. Moreover, they knew how to teach their students to question all ideas, including those of authority figures.


One more thing:  Teachers in the South had to be kept in a strict, figurative political box in teaching their students if they wanted to keep their jobs.  They had to teach only nouns and verbs, or the flora and fauna species.  There could be no questioning of controversial ideas, even in history or social studies classes. I think the Civil War was still referred to as the War Between the States.  And, this is teaching - in America?


Now to close out my points:  The South has long been a repressive, and even an authoritarian society, but New York City has been and is anything but that. Strict dress codes, strict codes of teaching rules, and repression of ideas are consistent with societies of paternalism, authoritarianism, and repression which the South, and even much of the U. S. has been for years.  Maybe, hopefully, through the published insight of excellent intellectual thinkers such as Mr, Aghasaleh that will change, and change quickly.


Thank you, Maureen Downey for publishing this article.  One of the most intellectual and insightful that you have ever published.


Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@MaryElizabethSings In 1973 in North Georgia, I was told by the crewcut and bow tied superintendent about both the on-campus and off-campus teacher dress code. The off-duty code included no shorts or hair curlers if away from the house.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Wascatlady 


Talk about paternalism.  You were held in no higher esteem than a working slave.  Unreal, but I believe every word you wrote!

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Wascatlady 


Now, that is funny!  Once, I interviewed with a black principal in Georgia.  He was from S.C. and like me, he headed North in his youth and came back South, later.  During the interview, he asked me why I went North as a young woman.  I looked at him for a long time, and then I boldly said, "Probably for the same reasons you did," which a sly grin on my face.


I, too, got the job!  He was a wonderful principal.  He died early.  I attended his funeral and took my child so that she would always remember him, as well.  Some people are movers in the South, and often they are our African-Americans friends who are in leadership positions.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@MaryElizabethSings I also remember my mother being asked, in 1962, in an interview for a teaching  position in Alabama," Do you smoke, do you drink, and do you curse?" Her reply, "I do smoke, I have, on occasion, taken a drink, and language-wise I can hold my own."  She got the job.

popacorn
popacorn

Small minded people cling to anyone or anything that supports their likewise silly beliefs.