Research shows black students punished more severely. Why don’t schools believe it and fix it?

Mike Tafelski is a supervising attorney in the Piedmont Office of Georgia Legal Services Program. He has represented several children in discipline cases in Atlanta’s exurbs.

Georgia Legal Services recently compiled discipline statistics from all Georgia school districts and found disturbing inequities in the punishments handed out to black students. Today, Tafelski writes about those findings.

Click here to read a New York Times story about one extraordinary metro Atlanta school discipline case. Click here to read a federal report on inequities in school discipline.

Despite all the consistent research and data showing black students are punished more severely for even mild transgressions — dress code violations, talking in class — the issue meets with great resistance from posters on this blog. I am not sure why. But the wide gulf between what the data and evidence show and what the public believes may be a reason the discipline disparities persist.

By Mike Tafelski

Images of businesses burning in Ferguson, Mo., and the still bodies of demonstrators carpeting streets in New York City protesting the killings of young black men by police are so disturbing because we all know we are one gunshot away from a similar incident here in Georgia.

Marquise Miller, 8, holds a sign outside Marietta Municipal Court during a peaceful demonstration earlier this month of police killings of unarmed black men. HYOSUB SHIN /AJC

Marquise Miller, 8, holds a sign outside Marietta Municipal Court during a peaceful demonstration earlier this month of police killings of unarmed black men. HYOSUB SHIN /AJC

In many cities and towns outside Atlanta, relationships are strained between police departments and the communities they serve. Our jails and prisons are overflowing with young black men arrested in alarming numbers, way beyond their representation in the population. Stories abound of pointless traffic stops or other encounters with police sparked by nothing more than driving or walking while black.

But to understand where this tense standoff began, we must look at our schools, where messages are sent daily that actions by African-American children must be punished more severely than those by white children. It is little wonder that the same dynamic plays out when those children are grown and confronting each other on the street.

Consider this: The Georgia Bureau of Investigation reports that in 2013, 65,230 people were arrested, 57.6 percent of whom were non-white. That same year, non-whites made up only 37.5 percent of the state’s population.

During the 2011-2012 school year, according to a report we here at Georgia Legal Services Program compiled using district data, African-American students represented 37 percent of all students but made up 54 percent of students who received in-school suspension, 66 percent of students who received out-of-school suspension, and 50 percent of students expelled.

The similarities between statistics on arrests and school discipline are not accidental.

While there are federal and state laws and policies expressly prohibiting discrimination against students of color, the initial referral of a student to the principal’s office, or a school official’s decision to seek the harshest punishment or even back-up from law enforcement, are not specifically covered by those laws and policies. It is into these gaps that many African-American students fall.

Mike Tafelski is a supervising attorney in the Piedmont Office of Georgia Legal Services Program

Mike Tafelski is a supervising attorney in the Piedmont Office of Georgia Legal Services Program

Here’s an illustration: In Macon, a 10-year-old African-American fourth grader was bullied on the playground by a white classmate. Back in the classroom, the black child wrote a note that said, in part, “Don’t mess with me or I will hurt you.” He drew a skull and crossbones underneath. The teacher intercepted the note and sent the black child to the principal’s office.

The white child was not disciplined at all. The black child was charged with making terroristic threats and expelled from school. A Georgia Legal Services lawyer helped get the charges dropped and the child back in school, but the impression was made, both on the African-American child and his white classmates.

White classmates see their black counterparts treated this way, and in the back of their minds, the seed is planted: This is the way black people should be treated. When those white children grow up to be police officers, teachers or employers, that seed blossoms into action, implicit or explicit, that push people of color away from participation in the systems of our society. For many black children, school careers filled with these shoves toward the door result in angry young people who drop out of school and have no use for the systems they perceive as “white only.”

“The message we send when we suspend or expel any student is that that student is not worthy of being in the school,” Catherine E. Lhamon, assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education, told Essence magazine. “That is a pretty ugly message to internalize and very, very difficult to get past as part of an educational career.”

Discipline systems must be reformed. Here’s how to start:

• Make sure school officials have met with the child’s parents to determine whether alternatives to long-term suspension, expulsion or criminal charges are considered before a disciplinary hearing is held.

• Ensure disciplinary hearings are conducted by an impartial third party. As it is, most school hearings are presided over by a school official, often the school system’s lawyer who is also representing the school. What incentive does that lawyer have to negotiate a more reasonable settlement than expulsion if he knows he will have such a powerful influence over the outcome of the hearing?

• Disciplinary hearings should use basic rules of law and evidence so that hearsay evidence is not relied upon to decide a child’s guilt or innocence.

• Of paramount importance: Schools should look at their discipline statistics and determine whether African-American children are being suspended or expelled in far greater numbers than their representation in the student population — and if so, figure out why.

With such a fundamental right — the right to an education — at stake, school officials and the communities they serve must recognize that, despite good intentions, unconscious biases can come into play. They must consider whether an African-American child deserves to be sentenced to a lifetime of anger and perhaps a lifetime of ignorance just because of the color of his skin.

Reader Comments 0

283 comments
duke14
duke14

At least one commenter thinks that our discussion of incidents outside the school is irrelevant. But Tafelski  begins his essay by mentioning the racial unrest in Ferguson. Clearly he believes it is relevant, and we agree that it is relevant. He is saying that whether inside or outside the school, we are dealing with the same problem; and that problem is White racism. We say the problem is Black lawlessness.

As several commenters have noted, Black students learn these disruptive behaviors at home or in the streets. The problem is not in the school, but in the world outside the school. Tafelski says that is a world where racist White policemen are terrorizing innocent Blacks. We say it is a world where lawless Black thugs are terrorizing law-abiding citizens of all races; and policemen of all races are risking their lives, and sometimes sacrificing their lives, in a losing battle to restrain the violence. That explains the statistics Tafelski cites. Black students are punished more because they misbehave more, and they misbehave more because they live in a world from which law and order are rapidly disappearing.

What can the school do? Not much. The problem is bigger than the school. We need more genuine Christian pastors preaching against sin, and fewer pseudo-Christian communist pastors preaching against our constitutional republican social order. But schools should identify those students who are incorrigible, and segregate from the general population. For the rest, institute a robust program of discipline- rules clearly defined; punishment swift, sure, and consistent. Students will respond positively to strict discipline when it is applied with a genuine concern for their wellbeing.

Tafelski says students should be assigned lawyers to represent them in disciplinary hearings, an image which should amuse anyone who has actually raised a child. But he is deadly serious. This is one more way that the socialist Left is trying the overthrow the authority of God and family, and to replace it with the authority of the godless secular state.

redweather
redweather

Public school teachers can't link grades with behavior, and that is a large part of this story.  Administrators won't sanction that because it will adversely affect a school's graduation rate.  Parents won't stand for that either for a variety of reasons..  So we graduate students who don't do the required school work and who are regularly disruptive.  As long as teachers are prohibited from linking grades with behavior, I don't see how this can change.  But the solution is surely not the kind of disciplinary hearings advocated by the writer of this article. We don't need more lawyers.  We need schools that link actions with consequences, both good and bad, as well as more involved parents.   



Lexi3
Lexi3

@redweather 


Rest assured that if students are granted greater procedural rights (e.g., the right to counsel, intricate rules of evidence and layers of appeal) the courts will: (1) insert themselves further into student discipline matters and (2) create a new found "right" to have taxpayer funded legal counsel at the proceedings. You should also expect that students will acquire expanded rights to sue teachers and administrators (who will be defended and indemnified at taxpayer expense) for violating these rights to due process. All will result in a further decline in school discipline and the quality of public education.

Common Sense Committee
Common Sense Committee

Statistics tell a story; they do not take a side.  The issue is not that administrators are unfairly targeting children of a specific race/ethnic group.  The statistics are showing where the majority of the incidents come from.  The majority of students behave and genuinely want to learn, but there is a small percentage (5% or less) that eat up the majority of the time and referrals from administration.  These kids have no business in schools!  They have the right to disrupt the learning for one person and one person only: themselves.  When they interfere with another's right to learn, then the discipline process must be followed.  Period.  If our system wants a substantive change, then the message needs to get out to those students who cause the discipline problems and their families.  The problem is not with the administrators or the discipline process.  If we truly want a change, then that comes from the source, not the reactionary process to what happens.  

newsphile
newsphile

Saw on the news that 7 pre-teens used a stolen auto, rammed it into a store, and then robbed it. I don't know what race they are and don't care.  What I do care about is that teachers have these 7 kids in their classrooms.  Kids are no longer mischievous.  Today's undisciplined kids kill, rob, rape, and do horrific things to others.  Yes, punishment for the same offense should be the same for all students, unless a student has committed the same offense more than once; that merits stiffer punishment.  Any offense meant to harm another student, teacher, or administrator should be punishable to the greatest extent.  Anyone opposing such punishment should take the offender into his/her home and see how it goes.  Talk is easy.

Starik
Starik

@newsphile Yesterday's kids did it too, in poor neighborhoods. We need to suppress the culture of poverty, specifically black poverty.  What do you suggest?

newsphile
newsphile

@Starik @newsphile  I don't believe this is a result of poverty.  There are many families in poverty who respect laws/rules/require their kids to behave in school, and there are wealthy families who do not.  Also, GA has many white families in poverty.  As stated earlier, I think everyone should receive equal punishment for equal behaviors at school.  When a student is habitually creating problems and when there is threat/harm to other students, teachers, individuals, I am in favor of harsher punishment - regardless of race.  I believe if the community would stand together and let students know bad behaviors will not be tolerated, the actions would diminish  - not all, but there would be improvement.  Students who are inclined to behave poorly do not believe they will face consequences.  Also, before anyone has the great resolution to this issue, I strongly believe he/she should a day or two in their local school.  It's easy to think one is an expert on the matter. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

I wish you folks would stick to the topic, which is not black crime outside of school or the black parents of the students in school, but the disciplinary situation inside the school and whether it's fair to the black students as a whole. The focus is on the way that the schools handle disciplinary problems.

I don't agree with the POV of Lexi3, Astropig, or traderjoe9, but at least they're discussing  aspects of the topic.

popacorn
popacorn

Like the article's accompanying picture is on topic? And 'you folks'? Sounds kind of racist. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@popacorn 

Can't there be white folks as well as black folks? I've heard black people refer to "white folks." Can't "folks" apply generically to everyone? Pretty sensitive, aren't you?

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Starik @OriginalProf @popacorn 

Well, I certainly don't think that lowering the number of expulsions and suspensions automatically is going to solve the problem.  I think that's known, no pun, as whitewashing. And there has to be administrative punishment for disciplinary infractions. I think that the source of the behavior is (literally) academic and unfixable. The problem here seems to be the inequality of the punishments given, where black students, especially black male students, are disproportionately punished.

The author of the essay here is asking schools to set up some neutral, third-party panel of judgment for the accused student, with evidence considered that is not merely hearsay. In other words, he wants legal standards for objective proof introduced, not necessarily lawyers.


This may involve changing the entire school culture. I don't know if it can be done. But I think it should.



Astropig
Astropig

@OriginalProf @Starik @popacorn 

" The author of the essay here is asking schools to set up some neutral, third-party panel of judgment for the accused student, with evidence considered that is not merely hearsay. In other words, he wants legal standards for objective proof introduced, not necessarily lawyers."

I would be 100%,you- bet,unflinchingly behind this...If it were a requirement for every serious disciplinary case,black,white or otherwise. Otherwise,there is no "equal protection" for all students under school policy.

newsphile
newsphile

@OriginalProf @Starik @popacorn   Before anyone wants to throw the baby out with the bath water, let's take note that necessary data is missing, as others have mentioned. I don't understand why more data wasn't requested prior to publishing the article.  Does the author stand to gain financially or academically?

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@newsphile @OriginalProf @Starik @popacorn 

As I see it, arguing about the statistical reliability of the article is "academic"---"theoretical or speculative without a practical purpose" (American Heritage Dictionary).  It's like arguing over the cause of the student's bad behavior: poor parenting? youth culture? poverty? and on and on.


But his suggestion, as a lawyer, is that school disciplinary cases should follow the legal rules about witnesses and evidence, with an impartial third-party judging. That seems to me an excellent one that schools can do now.



Starik
Starik

@OriginalProf @popacorn Seriously, OP, what is the solution?  It seems to me that if we reduce the number of suspensions and expulsions without changing the behavior the schools will get even worse than they are now.  If the source of the behavior is at home in the 'hood, how do the schools modify that behavior?

newsphile
newsphile

@OriginalProf @newsphile @Starik @popacorn  So, who would be witnesses?  A class of students who have already put the bad behavior video on youtube?  Really?  It makes a good sound-bite.  Implementation is another matter indeed.  People who have never spent an entire day in the classroom are ready with the answers.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@newsphile @OriginalProf @Starik @popacorn 

As you remind us, class misbehavior is likely to be captured on other students' cellphones. What does it matter if it's been posted to YouTube?  In fact, such posting would itself be further evidence of misbehavior, for it would show malice toward the teacher. Other students probably would be scared to snitch. Are there teachers in other rooms who heard the ruckus? There is, of course, the teacher, who would be cross-examined. If there has been physical fighting then there would be medical evidence.


I haven't spent a day in a K-12 classroom, but 40+ total years of University teaching have definitely acquainted me with classroom misbehavior. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@newsphile @OriginalProf @Starik @popacorn 

P. S. We are speaking about students whose serious misbehavior could lead to their suspension or expulsion.There are ways of producing evidence that don't rely solely on student witnesses.

Starik
Starik

@OriginalProf @Starik @popacorn So do I; such a tribunal, if truly race neutral, would still have the same problem - a disproportionate number of black kids being punished.  They might be punished more fairly.  The numbers might still be disproportionate, though.

newsphile
newsphile

@Starik @OriginalProf @popacorn     Many of them do have cell phones.  In S GA, they have free phones given by the government.  Although these phones weren't intended for students, that's the reality. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Starik @OriginalProf @popacorn 

To me, the real question here is whether these black students are being punished  in larger numbers than white students for unfair reasons. (They commit the same misbehavior, but get punished more severely.) Neutral tribunals that follow basic legal rules of evidence would take care of that issue. If black students really are misbehaving more than the white students, then you have a different problem--but not the one of disproportionate sentences.

Lexi3
Lexi3

As I lawyer, I love the fix suggested by the legal services lawyer--let's use scarce tax dollars to hire "neutral" outside lawyers to represent the accused in discipline hearings. With any luck and multiple stages of appeal, the transgressors will remain in school for years. And, of course, Mr. Tafelski sees no cost to the schoolmates victimized by the miscreants.


Many urban and suburban school systems now waste millions of dollars on security. Thirty years ago, these systems had none of these problems or concomitant expenditures. What changed? .

Astropig
Astropig

@Lexi3 @Astropig 

School choice would even allow some schools (hungry to please parents) to advertise their discipline policy as a competitive advantage. Parents with kids that have been bullied would look upon a "strict" code of personal deportment as a determining factor to choose a certain school.I would argue that bullying and unruly behavior go hand in hand because some of the worst miscreants are bullies,not just to fellow students,but also to staff and teachers.I know from private,personal discussions with teacher friends that some of them are mortified of their charges.The ones that suspect gang involvement are getting close to leaving the profession.Another benefit would be that school demographics would more accurately reflect the underlying prioritization of a good education in a given community.Black parents would not have to worry if their kids were being bullied or ridiculed for "acting white".


Before we lose these people,why not try an approach like real choice?

Astropig
Astropig

@Lexi3 


" As I lawyer, I love the fix suggested by the legal services lawyer--let's use scarce tax dollars to hire "neutral" outside lawyers to represent the accused in discipline hearings."

If black (and white) parents had real "dollars-follow-the-student" school choice,this stuff would  change in a big hurry.Students that were trying to learn would migrate to schools that were trying to teach and there wouldn't be any tolerance or excuse making for troublemakers that run off the respectful students.Of course,real choice is a different approach to the liberal mindset that we need to "tolerate" bad behavior or make all punishment "fair".(Anyone with more than one kid knows that one-size-fits-all discipline doesn't work).


This study comes dangerously close to suggesting that maybe the rules should be different for one set of students as opposed to the rest.It deserves every bit of ridicule heaped upon it here.

Lexi3
Lexi3

@Astropig @Lexi3 


Sounds ideal, but as long as tax dollars are supporting that education the students will have a [rapidly expanding] "right" to due process before being expelled. Followed the expansion of federal dollars into every crack and corner of higher education? If a single student receives a loan guaranteed by the feds, the feds assert a right to dictate to the institution concerning a panoply of matters, how sports dollars are allocated, how "rape" is defined....

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Astropig @Lexi3


Astro,


Just a question.  Lets suppose we allow "choice" all the way... with vouchers being freely given out to everyone.  What then happens to these disruptive students?  I mean, let's realistically address this issue.  They are not going to just suddenly "vanish".  They will still exist, and the problem of what to do to address their needs and behavior will still exist.  You aren't offering a solution to the problem.  You are just offering a way for those of sufficient means to escape the problem, and although that will "solve" the issue for that particular family, it will do nothing to solve the issue  for society.  So we give out vouchers?  We will still be facing this issue!  


Personally, I feel that rather than giving out vouchers to the well behaved students with involved parents, we should shift the problem children into schools better designed to meet their needs.  In general there are fewer problem students than there are well behaved students, or those willing to behave if certain instigators are removed from the classroom.   It would seem easier to address the problem elements than to try and restructure the entire system for the majority of students. 

Astropig
Astropig

@Quidocetdiscit @Astropig @Lexi3 

" You are just offering a way for those of sufficient means to escape the problem, and although that will "solve" the issue for that particular family, it will do nothing to solve the issue  for society.  So we give out vouchers?  We will still be facing this issue!  "


Again with the class warfare. ALL students should get vouchers.This is the same tired canard brought up every time choice is proposed.Good students are more or less hostages to the troublemakers now.Your idea is keep them (and more than afew teachers) hostages forever (or until you retire).You could give a crap about these good students.You just want to perpetuate a failed system for your own selfish reasons.You're questions are not even worthy of serious consideration,less a rebuttal.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Astropig 


Are you honestly going to tell me that those "vouchers" will pay the full tuition to the good schools for ALL the students in public schools?  If you REALLY think that, I have a few bridges I could sell you...


Are my questions not worth of consideration? Or are you just unwilling to admit there are no easy answers?  Did I suggest perpetuating the system?  I seem to recall proposing a possible solution.  I do not think you even bother to read what I write. You are too busy already deciding how you can attack me and try to make me out as some sort of boogieman to further your personal crusade.  In other words, your own ideas are the only ones you seem to think worthy of any attention.


You say ALL students should get vouchers?  So WHO is going to take those troublemakers?  Answer that.  Oh, wait.  You can't because my questions are conveniently not "worthy" of serious consideration...  In other words, you have no answer...



Selfish?  I have spent the majority of my life devoting myself to ALL those students, troubled or otherwise.  I CHOSE to do that rather that take a much easier or more lucrative career in just about ANY other field.  What have YOU done for students, besides mouth off on a blog?


And I respectfully request you NOT TELL ME who or what I give a crap about... one does not spend a lifetime working their tail off educating children they don't give a crap about.  You really are a sad individual that you seem to spend so much energy attacking the very people who are doing all they can to advocated for and help students - you know, doing actual WORK for those students everyday, day after day, as opposed to just sitting behind a computer screen and spouting off simplistic, unrealistic solutions.



Astropig
Astropig

@Quidocetdiscit @Astropig 

You're reflexively anti-choice because your paycheck depends on such a stance. A person can make himself believe anything if his living depends on it.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Astropig @Quidocetdiscit


One thing I have learned about people over the years is that they tend to project their own worldview onto others and assume that other people think and react the same way they do.  Thus the selfish assume everyone is selfish.  Those who cheat on their taxes assume everyone cheats on their taxes.  Those who gossip assume everyone is talking about them behind their backs, etc.  So because YOU cannot imagine having the ability to judge a situation separately from self interest, no one else can.


I guess, using YOUR logic, it is really YOU who does not give a crap about America's students.



And you still have not addressed the issue of what we do with the troublemaking children... though I do see that my comment, though, in your words, not worth "serious consideration, less a rebuttal" was worth an insult.





OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Quidocetdiscit @Astropig @Lexi3 

Excellent question! What school would freely accept the voucher of a disruptive student? You would wind up with public schools whose population was largely or completely the student dregs that no-one else wants--namely the disruptive students who are behind grade-level.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Lexi3 @Astropig 

And now you're really complaining about long-established Affirmative Action laws that apply to all American businesses accepting federal funds, the Attorney General's revised definition of rape that applies to all situations nationally....And don't all citizens have a right to due process in situations involving civil authorities?

Lexi3
Lexi3

@OriginalProf @Lexi3 @Astropig 


I confess I don't know what most of this comment is supposed to be about. No one mentioned "affirmative action." And, what do these topics have to do with school misbehavior, one might ask?

"Rape," like most other crimes not committed on federal property, is traditionally considered within the province of the states to define, and, all states have their own criminal laws. My reference was to the fact that the feds dumb down the definition to the point that they assert one in five "coeds" is "raped," a nonsensical assertion by the current administration that would embarrass Joseph Goebbels to make. Just another artifice to justify the feds inserting themselves further into academia. Schools traditionally stood in the place of parents while the students were in school. We call those the good old days. As the courts have encroached into discipline matters students have been awarded judicially created "rights" and discipline suffers. The real irony is that parents have contemporaneously shunted more parenting tasks onto the schools, which more and more, have less and less power to "parent."

traderjoe9
traderjoe9

“The message we send when we suspend or expel any student is that that student is not worthy of being in the school,” Catherine E. Lhamon, assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education, told Essence magazine. “That is a pretty ugly message to internalize and very, very difficult to get past as part of an educational career.”


Yes, that is a very appropriate message to send to kids with serious behavior problems. Private schools have the authority to kick kids out who violate the school rules for some behaviors. Public schools are required by law to keep them in school which teaches them and their parents that there are no consequences. School administrators have thrown in the towel in many cases when it comes to discipline. They will do whatever it takes to keep the kid in school and to mollify the parents in order to avoid law suits. Over a period of time, schools will refer a student for psychological evaluation to see if the kid meets the criteria for a behavior/emotional disorder. If they do, then the student is shunted off to another class enshrined with all kinds of federal regulations which keep the toxic kid in the school. Maninstreaming requirements mandate that the student must be allowed to participate in regular education classes. They do so wearing their new label as a badge of honor or dishonor and typically make the regular education classes unteachable. The number of staff hours it takes to keep these kids in school is beyond belief. IEP and disciplinary meetings can consume almost all of the administrative staff's time. So much for the non-problem kids or administrative support for the staff. And after all of this, the parents are not required to do anything. They don't have to change their parenting behaviors at home and they don't have to get their kid involved in therapy. What they will do is threaten the school systems continually demanding that they do something to fix their kid and/or to stop picking on their kid because he's not a problem at home.


Of course the lawyer post such statistics/studies. Lawyers have been trolling the schools for business for years, ever since Fed law 94-142 was passed. Some have made fortunes off of tax payer dollars. In one system I worked in which certain staff were given legal consultation regarding how to handle kids, parents, and lawyers in order to lessen the likelihood of a losing legal battle, I was finally able to obtain information on how many of the law suits the system had one. Zero! And yet the system still had to fight the legal battles because parents made absurd demands on the system for special treatment for their handicapped children.


This situation is not fixable. It's time for taxpayers to realize this and demand a voucher system. Parents can choose the school/educational experience they think is best for their children. The educational institution can do like private schools do now, kick kids out who are not ready to benefit from the experience. This puts the responsibility back on the parents to get their kids in shape for a learning experience whether it's counseling or some type of boot camp experience or what. But it should be obvious to all that public schools cannot teach the under socialized kids today and they ruin the experience of kids who are trying to learn. Schools are hostile social environments for the most part where kids are bullied and pick up bad behaviors even in pre-school. Time for a change. Let the lawyers find some other avenue for revenue.

Lexi3
Lexi3

@traderjoe9  Agreed that the miscreants and felons should be expelled. What the baiters fail to admit is that the transgressors impose huge costs on those in classrooms trying to learn. In baiter world, there are never any costs, or none borne by their "side."

Betsy Ross1776
Betsy Ross1776

This video exemplifies the attitude that is at the core of all the problems...
It's what OP vigorously denies is relevant.
Violence is a black sport, a lifestyle. Fights and violence are encouraged and videotaped and put on You Tube as if it was something to be proud of.
Just watch this video...black kids calling each other ni__er, beech, encouraging the fighting...all the kids with cell phones recording it and putting it on you tube. No one is concerned about the health and well being of these two female teenagers. It's a middle class black neighborhood with middle class black kids with their middle class cell phones....
WATCH IT AND WEEP.

Because this kind of behavior was created by blacks and they take it to school with them.
And there is NOTHING a school can do to change this behavior, which is ingrained in their society and values.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rbip_nafqjY

Starik
Starik

@Betsy Ross1776 Not middle class; just because they live in single-family housing rather than projects or apartments is not an indicator of middle-class status. Rentals, section 8 or not, and depressed housing prices in high crime areas trump what may appear to be decent housing.  Where are the adults? Working at minimum-wage jobs, probably, and hoping the neighborhood burglars don't rob them while they're at work. 



Betsy Ross1776
Betsy Ross1776

@Starik @Betsy Ross1776  Starik, look at the big expensive trucks and cars parked in the driveways The s-called parents are obviously at home and condone the bad behavior going on right in front of their noses. But, of course, you'll do or say anything to excuse the horrible behavior, which these kids take to school with them and record on their cell phones, which came from where? Those minimum wage jobs their parents have? Where do the big expensive trucks and cars come from? Those minimum wage jobs? I guess the parents took the bus to their minimum wage job and left their vehicles in the driveway of that nice three bedroom house with a big yard, trees and those kids with cell phones and service-- paid for with what? Minimum wage jobs? Yeah, Starik. No one is buying what you're selling.
GOOD behavior is free. Even poor people can behave well.
These kids in this video obviously aren't poor and they are obviously proud of their bad behavior and their crimes as they laugh and enjoy watching two young women beat each other up. It's a sport to them, entertainment. Something to record and put on You Tube to show all their friends what fun they're having....and yet you lay not one bit of responsibility on them nor their parents nor their community.

The problem they have is YOU, Starik. You are the problem and all the others who refuse responsibility for your own actions.

Betsy Ross1776
Betsy Ross1776

@Starik @Betsy Ross1776  The solution is to hold the parents accountable for the actions of their children and to kick the troublemakers out of the schools where real students want to learn and be safe.


Starik
Starik

@Betsy Ross1776 @Starik Where I live the blacks are successful and well-behaved.  They go to the good schools with their neighbors.  They do the right thing.  They go to good colleges; thanks to affirmative action, they go to VERY good colleges.  They do not behave like the kids in the video. The parents don't behave like the kids in the video.  I do not blame their race for behavior.  It's the poverty culture that surrounds them.


What solution do you have, by the way?

EdJohnson
EdJohnson

Inman Middle School has been to the Atlanta Public Schools system a source of “special causes of systemically dominant discipline challenges” three of the past five years, 2010 through 2014.


Page 3 summarizes the matter for Inman and similar other APS schools…

http://preview.tinyurl.com/oz47kfe

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

The topic, relating to discipline in schools, seems to have let loose a free-for-all of comments on black crime, black parenthood....black behavior outside of school. None of this is relevant to the issue of school discipline of black students in school. The prevailing sentiment here seems to be that black students deserve anything that educators choose to do to them in school.

Starik
Starik

@OriginalProf My sentiment is that black students commit a disproportionately large percentage of serious and repeat offenses, and consequently are disciplined more often.  The same applies to criminal justice. If anything, black kids are disciplined less than they deserve because of the complaints like the leading article.

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

@Betsy Ross1776  Because only black lives taken by white police matter to the liberal media, the President and his Attorney General, the politicians like the Mayor of New York City, the protestors, the rioters, and the racial grievance industry.

All other lives don't matter to them.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Betsy Ross1776 

I just want to point out that schools are prohibited from commenting about their students because of legal confidentiality rules.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Betsy Ross1776 @OriginalProf 

Not BS, but school law. Legally, the school can't reveal anything about the student or those who allegedly beat him up. Confidentiality rules. Any discussion about the Assistant Principal would involve discussion of the student, and that's not allowed.  And if the school is now involved in a lawsuit, you can be sure that their lawyer has advised them only to talk in court.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Starik @OriginalProf @Betsy Ross1776 

Can't tell from the link provided. And it's school rules that require fights by one student against another to be reported, not "the law." There's no video surveillance evidence of the locker-room fight between these two football players. I don't know if the "white boy" was "beaten to literally within a breath of his life": he was socked in the nose and it broke.


I'm going now... to all, a happy new year! Stay safe!

Betsy Ross1776
Betsy Ross1776

@OriginalProf @Betsy Ross1776 
BS. Pure BS.

The school is OBLIGATED BY LAW to report what happened to this boy.
The BLACK ASST. Principal at Inman clearly broke the law when he didn't report the near death beating of this white boy at Inman Middle School....

But now...
Now...when the white parents are suing the school, now the school isn't talking about it.
Funny how you love to twist the truth to suit your own purposes, OP.   

Betsy Ross1776
Betsy Ross1776

OP, you conveniently keep lying.

The school is obligated by law to report the crime and the asst. principal, who is black, BROKETHELAW by not reporting it. NO ONE is talking about revealing WHO beat up the kid. The law requires that the crime be reported.
If you cannot accept or understand this basic difference, you don't deserve that whatever diploma you have on your wall.
But, you'll keep arguing I'm sure...