Does merging Georgia State and Georgia Perimeter make sense for GSU?

I am hearing from folks concerned about the proposed merger of Georgia State University and Georgia Perimeter College.

Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby is expected to recommend the merger to the Board of Regents Tuesday.

Does Georgia State win anything in the proposed merger with Georgia Perimeter?  (AJC photo)

Does Georgia State win anything in the proposed merger with Georgia Perimeter? (AJC photo)

Is it a win in any way for GSU, a research university that has grown in prestige and enrollment, to absorb a two-year school with essentially open admissions?

I understand the economic advantages for the Regents and state. I don’t see the academic ones for GSU.

According to the AJC’s higher ed reporter Janel Davis:

The consolidation would make the new institution the largest within the state’s system of public colleges and universities with almost 54,000 students. The move would also be notable for its joining of Georgia State, a four-year research institution with Georgia Perimeter, a two-year access institution.

The merger will be the sixth consolidation within the past two years of schools within the state’s system of public colleges and universities.

System Chancellor Hank Huckaby first suggested mergers in September 2011, a few months after he took over as chancellor, as part of a large-scale plan to deal with declining state revenues. The plan first went into effect early last year, when the state Board of Regents agreed to merge eight institutions into four new ones, which shrank the system from 35 to 31 colleges.

The Georgia State/Georgia Perimeter merger announcement comes as Georgia State looks to expand its footprint in downtown Atlanta with redevelopment of Turner Field and the surrounding area into a 30,000-seat sport stadium and mixed-use retail and residential development.

 

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54 comments
SDMD
SDMD

Olens like the chancellor are merely hand-picked puppets of the governor.   The only thing head monkey hank and his tribe of chimpanzees (i.e. the regents) do well....is make Georgia look bad.   There's little respect for them among the 31 institutions they "oversee".   In fact, most colleges administrators abhor the regents. Their buffoonery is legendary.


http://gwmac.com/anthony-tricoli-praised-former-usg-chancellor-davis-outstanding-leadership/#axzz3OBnv6Fjb

http://www.thefire.org/cbs-atlanta-investigation-of-georgia-regents-reveals-years-of-mishandled-appeals/

http://www.topix.com/forum/city/athens-ga/T7EOGT0FIPS18O0ES

http://www.flagpole.com/news/city-dope/2014/05/28/georgia-university-administrator-florida-is-better-than-uga


As for Olens, many cobb countians have a great disdain for him after years as a power-hording county commissioner. It's been said by others that he is more helpful to sum (apologies...some) than others.

Denise Caldon Sorkness
Denise Caldon Sorkness

As one of the Whistleblowers mentioned in the latest investigative report (link below), and, on behalf of the increasing number of Whistleblowers, we encourage you to take the time to read the latest investigative report – including the links in the article - and request answers from your elected officials AND Governor Deal as to why Governor Deal will NOT respond to the request for a Special Investigator that does not have a "Conflict of Personal and Professional Interest" like Attorney General Sam Olens.  Olens has either sealed the evidence from public view or not investigated the evidence – as admitted by Attorney General Olens. The time for a Bill to be introduced to bring back accountability by the Board of Regents of the USG (a.k.a., the "Southern Mafia"), and their co-conspirator in confirmed RICO (racketeering) violations, Attorney General Sam Olens, is long overdue: 

http://gwmac.com/motive-for-tricoli-ouster-was-gsu-and-gpc-merger/#ixzz3O4XJ5Xwg

http://www.myajc.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/investigator-sought-to-examine-ex-university-syste/nh33C/                                                                                                                                                         http://gwmac.com/poitevint-deposition/                                                                                                                Georgia Whistleblower Protection Act Case, CALDON v BOR  Fulton County Superior Court - 2009-CV-165267 Court of Appeals No. A11A0382

AtlantaAcademic
AtlantaAcademic

To all who have expressed concern about the costs to students of the Georgia State/ Georgia Perimeter consolidation:  Obviously the details remain to be worked out.  However, right now, Georgia State does not offer associate degrees and Georgia Perimeter offers only associate degrees.  Presumably the consolidated institution will offer both bachelor's degrees (as well as graduate degrees) and associate degrees.  When Gainesville State consolidated with North Georgia College and State University to form the University of North Georgia, the situation was similar.  They have maintained two different tuition schedules:  one for the "associate track" and one for the "bachelor track."  (http://ung.edu/business-office/_uploads/files/spring2015tuitionandfeeschedules/Spring%202015%20UNG%20Undergraduate%20Tuition%20and%20Fees_GA_OC_CU.pdf) Since one of the Regents' major goals is to maintain and improve college affordability, I assume that the consolidated Georgia State University will have a tuition schedule that will retain some of these savings for associate degree students.

redweather
redweather

Even if they have reservations about the merger, I would bet money GPC faculty are glad the school isn't being "merged" into the technical college system.

JacketFan77
JacketFan77

As a past member of the GPC faculty, my thoughts and prayers go out to my former colleagues. After the budget debacle in 2012 that saw over 300 GPC employees - good, hardworking people - lose their jobs, I can't help but feel for those still there going through yet another big change. Certainly, there will be more layoffs and it's heartbreaking to see that happen to GPC again. Of course, the biggest losers are those students who benefited from a more financially sustainable resource for higher education. While we don't know the particulars of this deal, there is the possibility that many young people in this state will be left without a viable pathway to higher education. As a majority minority-serving institution, GPC helped many young people and non-traditional students rise up out of poverty and hard life situations through education. I pray that paradigm can still exist, but I am not overly optimistic that it will. Again, I am with the GPC family in spirit in this and hope for the best. 

Old Timer in USG
Old Timer in USG

@JacketFan77 Did you ever speak with Rob Watts in person? If yes, what sense did you get of him. He is after all the one largely behind all these mergers. The guy creeped me out. He seems very insecure and unstable. 

yaiteachsowaht
yaiteachsowaht

“Georgia State is a recognized national leader in improving student retention and graduation rates and will be able to apply its best practices,” said Chancellor Hank Huckaby. “Combining these attributes with Georgia Perimeter College’s leadership in providing access to students across the metro area presents a major opportunity to improve student success.”


I kind of respect someone who doesn't even bother to use the educational buzzwords.  Nothing about "educating" or "learning" or "teaching".  All these years I thought I was doing my best to help keep my students in school and help them move toward graduation... turns out all I am doing is providing "access".  Where's my doorman's outfit?


OriginalProf
OriginalProf

No, it does not make academic sense for GSU, but the Regents clearly don't give a hang about academic matters here. This merger seems on a par with their decision a year ago or so to merge the Medical College of Georgia--a highly ranked school nationally--with Augusta State University--a mediocre liberal arts school not much known outside Augusta. The result was Georgia Regents University. I note that last April GRU's president Azziz was a finalist at some branch university in Texas. I don't know if he got the job. But I am pretty sure that GSU's President Mark Becker is sending out his resumes right now too. 


If people aren't too familiar with GSU as one of Georgia's four research universities, then they just haven't been keeping up with higher education in Georgia. GSU has had that ranking since the 1990s, and it only goes to schools that offer doctorate programs. So the faculty must be of doctorate caliber--  winning federal grants, and publishing books and articles at a prodigious clip.

.

Not that any of that matters to the Regents. They evidently see higher education as simply one business like any other.  What a bunch of ninnies.

yaiteachsowaht
yaiteachsowaht

@OriginalProf Because winning federal grants, publishing books and articles at a prodigious clip leaves you lots of time to interact with students?

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@yaiteachsowaht @OriginalProf 

There are two faculty "tracks" at GSU.  The "research track" is for the producing and publishing faculty, who have lower teaching loads (2 courses a term, usually) and the "teaching track" for those who don't produce any research at all (3 or 4 courses a term). Btw, research shows that the publishing, producing faculty member is also a better University teacher because of his/her active engagement in the field.  Also, faculty who bring in national research grants also bring in funding for their university, since the government gives the school money for the indirect costs of the research project. This can be an important revenue source for the school.


But you do touch on another problem here. GSU is a "research university," and values that. GPC is a "teaching school" and values that, with heavier class loads for its faculty. Two very different cultures. May make for some difficult adjustments, especially for the GPC faculty.

yaiteachsowaht
yaiteachsowaht

@OriginalProf @yaiteachsowaht    I would like to see that research on research making a better teacher.  How are they quantifying "better"? There are so many possible ways of measuring that.  If I had only one (or two, or even just three) class to teach per semester I suspect that I might look "better" in some ways too.  Yes, what you say is completely true for higher level courses but I know that it is not true for lower level courses.  I have often seen it work the other way - experts in the field who have forgotten how they learned something, i have seen very few experts actually run a class in which they are (1) aware of common student misperceptions relevant to that day's topic (2) know and are comfortable with techniques for efficiently assessing for those misperceptions on the spot and (3) know what to do with that information.  More often, they are really good at giving a good show... which does have its place... but my opinion is that if students are not able to ask questions and be given time to make some mistakes IN CLASS, then neither the teacher or the student is working as hard as they need to and they might as well be at home watching a video.


But like you said, grants bring overhead $.  Good teaching, because it pushes them out of their comfort zone, brings in student complaints.  The two obviously aren't mutually exclusive, but there is a tension there.


I am due to come up for tenure in 2016 so this just sort of important for me. :)

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@yaiteachsowaht @OriginalProf 

I agree with you here too...although I disagree with the usual cliche that a researcher must be a poor teacher. 

But the reality is that lower-level courses are bigger with students who need more work than the higher-level courses--as we all know who teach-- so those are the courses that the "teaching track" faculty teach. The researching scholars mainly teach the upper-level and the graduate courses.  That's the pecking order.


I don't know your field.  But I advise you to read GSU's "University Guidelines for Tenure/Promotion.' that applies to all fields. (Go to their Webpage, under "Faculty" and "policies."  Or just Google it.) Because it's so new, many departments have just opted out of having any college or departmental guidelines.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@yaiteachsowaht @OriginalProf 

P.S. Please see the later blog devoted to this topic of the merger. There will be an "Implementation Committee" to work out the details, including things like tenure for GPC faculty, I presume.  It's due to finish its work by Fall 2016...which thus would include you.

thatgirl8744
thatgirl8744

I had a torturous experience trying to graduate from GSU.  First they practically merged with Morris Brown and now a two year college.  This is getting painful.  It just seems like some folks want to make GSU the ugly stepsister and I don't like it.  I had to have an SAT over 1000 on a 1600 scale to get in at the time. 


GSU has a law school, they should be moving in the direction of a medical school right now NOT a two year college.  I vote no, and yes GSU has always been a premiere university with lots of research dollars flooding in especially in the hard sciences. 

AdamRichard
AdamRichard

@thatgirl8744 Over 1000.. Considering 1000 is the mean SAT score, getting a little above it to get into a major university is not exactly asking a lot.


MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

One merger down: The Regents just sent out this statement:

Today, the Board of Regents granted final approval to the creation of the new Kennesaw State University (KSU) from the consolidation of Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University (SPSU).

Dr. Dan Papp, current president of KSU, will serve as president of the newly consolidated Kennesaw State.

“Our challenge and opportunity is to control the cost of college while strengthening the quality and accessibility of the programs and degrees we offer,” said University System Chancellor Hank Huckaby. “The new Kennesaw State University will expand opportunities for students and do so more efficiently.”

The board’s action today follows the December 2014 required approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) of the KSU consolidation plans.

With the Board action, Kennesaw State begins operating as the new institution with an expanded academic and research mission and new academic programs. “The University System has now consolidated 10 institutions into five in an effort to better serve students,” said Shelley Nickel, vice chancellor for Planning and Implementation for the University System. “This consolidation is furthering the System’s goal of developing operational efficiencies and reinvesting the resources and savings for academics for our students.”

Huckaby announced his recommendation for the KSU consolidation in November 2013, which the Board of Regents approved later that month.

“This is a historic moment for both institutions, for all the people who have worked so hard to bring consolidation about, and especially for all current and future students, faculty and staff of the new Kennesaw State,” said Daniel S. Papp, president of the consolidated University. “We are grateful that the Board has endorsed our plans for creating an exceptional university from two distinct institutions and for combining our strengths and resources.”

With the completion of the KSU consolidation, the University System of Georgia is comprised of 30 institutions now.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

The merger of Southern Poly with KSU made sense to me.  In that case, you took a small, specialized school and merged it into a regional university.  There are benefits of allowing the students to complete core curriculum at either location and then entering into the Southern Poly School of Engineering for their engineering degree.  There were also efficiencies gained by consolidating operational activities such as payroll, purchasing, facilities maintenance, etc, etc.

GSU and Ga Perimeter?  Doesn't make sense to me.  GPC has five campuses and 21000 students.  GSU has one large, downtown Atlanta campus and 25000 undergrad students.  I just don't see any benefit from merging the two.

Maureen asks if the merger made sense for GSU.  The question should be does it make sense for either.

redweather
redweather

@Lee_CPA2  Much will depend on how this merger works (assuming it gets the go-ahead).  Will first and second year GSU students be able to take classes at GPC campuses at the reduced tuition rate?  I could see that benefitting both schools. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@redweather @Lee_CPA2 

Don't you think it's more likely that the tuition for the GPC students will go up to the GSU level? Do you really think the Regents will arrange something to give a reduced tuition rate to anyone?

Astropig
Astropig

As to the GSU football debate: It was a really stupid move. GSU simply doesn't have the on campus culture to sustain a competitive football program at the highest level of competition.The costs to compete at the level that they have moved to are astronomical. Major college football programs are engaged in an arms race that schools like GSU cannot hope to keep up with.The program went from no team to division I in less than 4 years,which is like asking a beginning trombonist to play Carnegie Hall after a couple of semesters-they simply were not ready.The coach admitted as much this year when he pointed out (and this paper reported) how substandard facilities are a major recruiting handicap.The answer? Well, more money,of course. The cynical among us would venture that bringing such a disparate (similarly immature) institution such as GPC into the fold is a way to get a quick hit of revenue to fund these pie-in-the-sky dreams of building a GSU edifice at The Ted.


Either way, just look at the trajectory of UAB football and you can get a rough idea of what will happen at GSU.The politiics are different , but the end result will be the same. It will just take time.

dontstereotypemeyo
dontstereotypemeyo

@Astropig


The politics are nowhere near the same. UAB football failed solely because the UAB board of trustees is run by the UAT (the Crimson Tide people) who sabotaged UAB football at every turn. The reason is that the Crimson Tide folks want to be the only major football school in the state. They would shut down football at Auburn if they had the ability to. These folks have come right out and said "the state of Alabama already has a football team to represent it - the Crimson Tide - and we all need to put all our resources into supporting it" and they depict Auburn as interlopers. Money was never an issue for UAB, because the UAB medical complex and engineering school generates enough money to pay for four football teams. UAB is actually the second highest revenue generating university in the state. The idea that a football team has to pay for itself to be justified is only spread by the anti-football lobby. The truth is that athletics departments who do not have football teams lose as much money as those who do. Do you honestly think that all these schools that offer only Olympic sports (basketball, track etc.) generate revenue? How? 


This "it will take time" nonsense: what about the schools that have been running mid-major football programs for DECADES? Is Louisiana Tech on the verge of losing their football program? Is San Diego State? Marshall? Tulane? Miami of Ohio? The folks who oppose football Georgia State are cut from the same cloth as those who opposed it at UAB: they don't want other programs in the state except their own (whether it be UGA or GT). 

Tcope
Tcope

Starting a football program was a stupid decision for GSU. This merger is another dumb idea. Giving Southern Poly to KSU falls into the same category as this idea.

redweather
redweather

@Tcope  Why was the football program a dumb idea?  Why was the Southern Poly/Kennesaw merger a dumb idea?

50Concept
50Concept

ga state is a research university---ga perimeter is a community college---ga state doesn't need this low rent school dragging down their reputation.  they are getting hosed by the regents on this deal.

redweather
redweather

@LostBurro  It's funny how GSU's stature as a "research university" seems to have suddenly grown by leaps and bounds with news of this proposed merger.  Seldom before this have I noticed anyone referring to GSU as a research university.

dontstereotypemeyo
dontstereotypemeyo

@redweather @LostBurro


You haven't noticed it because you haven't been paying attention. Georgia State University is a Carnegie RV/UH institution, a classification that means "very high research activity". Only 107 universities in the country have this classification, and only 4 in Georgia (Georgia Tech, UGA, Emory and Georgia State). Georgia State isn't elite in terms of its admissions policies or reputation, but being an elite university and a research university are two different things. The University of Nebraska was (until 2011) an AAU school (a very prestigious research ranking) despite having an open admissions policy. 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_research_universities_in_the_United_States

yaiteachsowaht
yaiteachsowaht

@LostBurro Do students learn more if their classes cost more money?  Are you aware of average class size in introductory courses at these two schools?  Are you aware of how many students GPC has educated who then transferred into and graduated from GSU, UGA, Tech and Emory??? And oh, I teach at GPC.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro 

Proof?  Accepted by whom? It seems that you are relying on an old image of GSU as a commuter university that was outdated by the mid-2000s. The number of GSU faculty who have won national research grants is substantial --have you kept up with this figure?  Do you know the excellent publication records of its faculty? Do you know the figures on number of doctoral programs GSU offers, and their placement record for their graduates into academic jobs and executive positions?


And just how does GPC compare in these areas? Are the faculties of the two institutions comparable? GSU would lend considerable prestige to GPC, but what does GPC have to offer GSU besides additional students?

LCC_76
LCC_76

@OriginalProf @redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro Given the state of the academic job market, the number of GPC faculty with PhDs from research-1 universities and publication records is only increasing. As one of them, I would ask you to be more optimistic about opportunities for collaboration between GSU and GPC faculty and open to the possibility that their faculty have more in common than you suggest. Moreover, the students have more in common than many are assuming here-- as other GPC faculty who have chimed in are urging you to consider. Indeed, the students are largely the same people: see the percentage of transfers to GSU from GPC. I've taught undergraduate students at three research-1 universities. The students at GPC are not THAT different from them. Moreover, they deserve respect. My concern is whether the merger would actually increase their opportunities, as the admins' language about the proposal claims. For the economic future of Georgia, let's hope so.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@LCC_76 @OriginalProf @redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro 

Yes, I agree that the present academic job market assures that many GPC faculty have doctorates. And I didn't mean to slam GPC faculty. In fact, several of my former doctoral advisees finished their degree work and took positions at GPC.


However, at this point GSU non-tenure track Instructors very often have the doctorate. All the tenure-track faculty do. The new University Guidelines for Tenure/Promotion passed in 2012 require substantial publication (many articles or a book) AND preferably a national grant for tenure, plus of course superior student evaluations.  How will the present GPC faculty fare under these standards?

yaiteachsowaht
yaiteachsowaht

@OriginalProf @redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro As someone who teaches as GPC, I would suggest to you that we at GPC do nothing but teach (no research etc), we have a LOT of experience to bring to the table.  I am not saying that GSU doesn't, but let's face it teaching is more than standing in front of students and saying things. I have a fancy PhD from Emory, worked in research for many years but now I teach 5. classes. a. semester.  No TAs here.  I spend an equal amount of time in preparing for my classes with engaged techniques, analyzing the results from classroom assessment and using that information to change what I am doing in that particular class than I ever did when I was doing research at a fancy 4 year institution doing biomedical research, publishing etc etc.  Not to mention that education research is a field unto itself with incredible amounts of studies to be read and evaluated to see if I can use the results in my classes.


In science at GPC we teach all of our introductory laboratories ourselves.  We know a thing or two about education. Fine, give us "prestige", that's great.... we will bring some educational chops to combine with your educational chops.  


But none of this is actually about teaching or learning or education

yaiteachsowaht
yaiteachsowaht

@OriginalProf @LCC_76 @redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro At some point it would be nice if GSU recognized that bringing in grants, doing research and writing papers is not easy to combine with a full teaching load and that educational research is it's own field.  I interviewed at UGA a while back for a position which was specifically for someone with biomed research experience but at UGA they would be on an educational research tenure track.  Interesting idea but just about every faculty I interviewed with seemed to think that animations in Power Point are a cutting edge classroom "technology".


How this works out for us GPC folks will probably rest largely on whether GSU sees the important difference between retention rates/graduation and learning/teaching.  Obviously related but not at all the same thing.


redweather
redweather

@OriginalProf @redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro  Nothing I have posted was in any way intended as some kind of comparison between the faculty at GPC and GSU.  As for what GPC has to offer besides more students, a lot of hardworking faculty who have been underpaid for years.  Don't imagine that will change, however.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@yaiteachsowaht @OriginalProf @redweather @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro 

 I agree with everything you write here. Everything.  But you're merging with a "research university" that has great aspirations.  Its administration will assume that as faculty members you are of course doing published research...or else you'll get shoved to the teaching track. Hmm...you say you're teaching 5 courses a term now? Wonder if they're going to lower you to 4 (unless you start publishing up a storm), or raise the GSU "teaching track" to 5?  I can guess which it'll be.
 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@redweather @OriginalProf @dontstereotypemeyo @LostBurro 

You got it! This year, for the first time since 2008, GSU faculty are to get a raise...but it turns out to be around 1%  and "merit-based." This means that the person has published a lot or gotten some fancy award or grant...all of which were made possible by the special university grants to publishing faculty.

AtlantaAcademic
AtlantaAcademic

@LostBurro 


Georgia Perimeter is not a "community college." It is a "state college" that is a primarily two year unit of the University System of Georgia. The University System of Georgia does not have true technical colleges, which typically combine technical education and credit-bearing associate degree courses.  Georgia Perimeter College's primary mission has been to prepare students for associate degrees (made up of transferable credits) or transfer to other USG institutions. Technical education in Georgia is handled primarily by institutions that are part of the Technical College System of Georgia.  Georgia State is a research university, but it has a large (and very successful) access mission; the consolidation with Georgia Perimeter College will expand this mission. Georgia State has an excellent and well-deserved reputation, which will not be harmed by adding Georgia Perimeter College students into the mix.  Georgia State already receives a huge number of transfer students from Georgia Perimeter College. 

redweather
redweather

The devil is in the details, but these kinds of arrangements exist in other states.  Kent State University in Ohio, for instance, has seven two-year campuses. Not sure exactly how it all works, but they are "access" institutions.

dontstereotypemeyo
dontstereotypemeyo

@redweather


Kent State is not a research school. But otherwise, that is a good point. My only gripe is that Georgia State University's administration will not be motivated to make their new branch campuses the best two year college that it can be, and the region (both the students and economy) really do need a strong 2 year college. Instead, Georgia State's main emphasis will be building up the undergraduate and graduate and research programs. The 2 year programs, if they even keep them, will be an afterthought.

Akello
Akello

@redweather As a native Ohioan, I'm very familiar with Kent State.  They do have a model that could be duplicated with GSU and GPC, under the right circumstances, of course.  I'm glad you reminded me about Kent St, because I have some strong reservations regarding this proposal.  Also, Don is incorrect; Kent St is a research univ.  

mottayaw
mottayaw

Both institutions have their place. I would suggest comparing the cost of attending your first two years at Georgia Perimeter versus Georgia State. In the end, the biggest loser in this equation is the student.

HIbought theRefs
HIbought theRefs

@mottayaw PRECISELY!  And the Regents just don't care.  If they did, they'd figure out a comprehensive "backoffice" process for all the schools to share (for example, centrallized registration system across all of the USG schools, with some local presence at each campus to handle special situations), centralized accounting and financial systems, etc.  Keep the learning local and specific to the student population, but things that can be handled elsewhere or centralized, do that to save money.  

And we don't need any more students at GPC Dunwoody.  Unless GSU intends to initiate a Panther shuttle to/from MARTA, you'll see lots of blowback from Dunwoody residents about anything that adds to the volume of student traffic at this location.

Soymilk
Soymilk

@mottayaw As a graduate from GPC, I can attest to the prices. Three classes at GPC at this time, is about $1,200. I am now at KSU. The cost for three classes is $2,700. Thank goodness I have a full time job to pay for the classes but the merger is taking away the option to be able to afford college for many students. And without college, the only jobs that are available will be low paying ones. 


I needed the prices and flexibility to achieve what I am now accomplishing at KSU. GPC was affordable and accredited. Thank goodness I graduated in 2010. But I feel really sad for the students behind me that won't be able to afford the prices at GSU.   

Lexi3
Lexi3

Seems likely to dilute the hard-earned reputation of GSU as a solid research university. Gresham's law says that bad money drives out good, and bringing in students who lack traditional academic skills is likely to drive away students who have them and choices.


P.S.: Creating a football program at GSU was a stupid, resource wasting idea.

DeKalbFamily
DeKalbFamily

@Lexi3 That slam against all GPC students is really undeserved.  I teach at GPC, and the vast majority of the students I have taught are very capable.  GPC attracts a lot of students who want an excellent education at a low price tag; there is a lot of merit to minimizing the amount needed to pay back student loans after graduation.