Gov. Deal names Education Reform Commission members. A notable bunch.

From the Governor’s Office today:

Gov. Nathan Deal, shown here at his recent 2015 Inaugural Gala, has chosen his Education Reform Commission members. (. Curtis Compton / ccompton@ajc.com)

Gov. Nathan Deal, shown here at his recent 2015 Inaugural Gala, has chosen his Education Reform Commission members. (Curtis Compton/ccompton@ajc.com)

Gov. Nathan Deal today named the individuals who will serve on the Education Reform Commission that he announced during his State of the State address.

The commission will study the state’s education system, including its funding formula, and provide recommendations intended to improve the system, increase access to early learning programs, recruit and retain high-quality instructors and expand school options for Georgia’s families.

“My vision for K-12 education in Georgia is a system driven by student need that provides local school and district leaders with real control and flexibility,” said Deal.

“With this commission now in place, it is my hope that we will work together to make education more accessible and effective in preparing our state’s students for the rigors of college and the workforce. Georgia families depend on our classrooms, and now it’s time we take the responsibility in full to provide the high-quality, technologically advanced education they so deserve. I fully anticipate this commission will help bring my vision to reality and I’m grateful for the members’ willingness to serve.”

The commission will convene throughout the year to comprehensively review the state’s education system and QBE funding formula in order to provide recommendations on possible executive, legislative and agency fixes.

The recommendations will be sent to Deal by Aug. 1 of this year, with some going into effect as early as the 2016-2017 school year. Chuck Knapp, former president of the University of Georgia, will chair both the commission and the subcommittee on funding reform.

Commission members are listed below:

Name

Madelyn Adams,  Director of Community Benefit, Kaiser Permanente of Georgia

Matt Arthur, Deputy Commissioner, Technical College System of Georgia

Robert Avossa, Superintendent, Fulton County Schools

Greg Beadles, Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative and Financial Officer AMB Sports and Entertainment

Brad Bryant, Director, REACH Scholarship program

Brooks Coleman, Chairman, House Education Committee, Georgia General Assembly

Tom Dickson, Chairman, House Education Appropriations Subcommittee, Georgia General Assembly

Mike Dudgeon, State Representative, Georgia General Assembly

Kent Edwards, Superintendent, Carrolton City Schools

Terry England,  Chairman, House Appropriations Committee, Georgia General Assembly

Tina Fernandez, Partner, Bellweather Education Partners

Mike Glanton, State Representative, Georgia General Assembly

Barbara Hampton, Sixth Congressional District Member, State Board of Education

Tyler Harper, Chairman, Senate Public Safety Committee, Georgia General Assembly

Hannah Heck,  Attorney, Vice Chair and Founding Board Member Westside Atlanta Charter School

Jack Hill, Chairman, Senate Appropriations Committee, Georgia General Assembly

Kylie Holley, Principal/Superintendent, Pataula Charter Academy

Bonnie Holliday, Executive Director,, Georgia Charter Schools Commission

Amy Jacobs, Commissioner, Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning

Audrey King, South Region External Affairs Manager, Georgia Power Company

Cynthia Kuhlman, Director of Educational Achievement, Cousins Family Foundation, Inc.

Fran Millar, Chairman, Senate Higher Education Committee,  Georgia General Assembly

Nels Peterson, Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs, University System of Georgia

Hunter Pierson, Vice Chairman, New Schools New Orleans, co-founder of Young Professionals for Education Equity

Noris Price, Superintendent, Baldwin County Schools

Elizabeth Rhodes Retired Teacher, Educators First

Will Schofield, Superintendent, Hall County Schools

Freddie Powell Simms, State Senator, Georgia General Assembly

Lindsey Tippins, Chairman, Senate Education and Youth Committee, Georgia General Assembly

Anthony Townsend, Principal, Locust Grove Middle School, Henry County

Alvin Wilbanks, Superintendent, Gwinnett County Schools

Pam Williams,  2011 Georgia Teacher of the Year, Appling County High School

Dick Yarborough, Columnist, retired BellSouth Corporation executive, managing director of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games

Reader Comments 0

63 comments
frogg
frogg

One, only ONE teacher that is currently in the classroom. Really? 

And no representation from the Special Education sector at all. 


jerryeads
jerryeads

Having watched ed "reform" for now something like forty years, forgive me if I don't get too optimistic about this bunch - august though it may be - "fixing" much of anything. "Commissions" have been the "solution" for "fixing" education for far longer than that. With, as near as I can tell, not much help. And simpletons will continue to call for simplistic changes (like "choice") as if all will be well just by flipping a switch.

Astropig
Astropig

@jerryeads


And crooks will continue to call for the current system to be "fully funded".

hadleyferry
hadleyferry

Georgia is divided into 16 Regional Education Services Agencies (RESA) from across the state. Each has a board of directors comprised of every school superintendent in that RESA district. There is a tremendous amount of knowledge concerning what is best for Georgia's students in this diverse group of people. Each RESA has a director who represents his/her area, as well as the collective understanding, needs and what direction is best for their students.These directors already meet together.  This board comprised of these individuals from around the state better understands what is best for not only our children, but would not represent educational companies who feed at the educational funding trough. I would encourage the Governor to use the service of this group of people for his reform commission. 


EdUktr
EdUktr

“Dollars should follow pupils, through a big expansion of voucher schemes or charter schools. In this way, good schools that attract more pupils will grow; bad ones will close or be taken over. Unions and their Democratic Party allies will howl, but experiments in cities such as battered New Orleans have shown that school choice works.

—The Economist magazine, 1/24/15 http://tinyurl.com/o5xasle

EdUktr
EdUktr

@Quidocetdiscit @EdUktr

Oh, come now. The Investigative Fund is an offshoot of the proudly left-wing publication The Nation. Hardly a place to find balanced views on anything. 

The Economist, on the other hand, endorsed Obama in both his presidential runs—but here sides with kids rather than unions.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@EdUktr @Quidocetdiscit


Did you even bother to read the article?  It pointed out both positive and negative aspects of the charter movement.  But i guess it is just easier to dismiss anything that might go against your current drum pounding.

insideview
insideview

@newsphile, perhaps he did include Cherokee and Forysth because they don't look like the rest of Georgia.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

Unfamiliar with Educators First, I looked at their website.  There are NO pictures of anyone but WASPS in any of the pictures.  And they came out heavily for Deal.

Astropig
Astropig

@Wascatlady


The campaign is over. Time to stop the racial hatred. That's why your side lost.

Astropig
Astropig

@OriginalProf @Astropig @Wascatlady


I'll admit that I don't know the race or ethnicity of every member of the commission. It's unimportant to me as I only want the commission to do their jobs well.If your side would stop playing identity politics with every issue on the board, you might get more traction with the public.


The only member that I'm really familiar with is Yarborough. He writes a boring column that nobody reads in marginal weekly papers (one of which goes unsold in my county). Other than that, I could give a toss what color these people are. If they were all black,I'm sure that there would be an outcry from whomever in opposition. Playing the race card doesn't make for good public policy on either side of the political divide.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Astropig @OriginalProf @Wascatlady 

I don't think it's "playing the race card" to observe that very often Latino and African-American people--both parents and teachers-- have different educational perspectives that should be taken into account as part of the overall picture. I think this is particularly the case given the present issues surrounding the state's Latino  immigrants, such as the recent "border kids."

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Astropig @Wascatlady 

Are the students in Georgia's public schools exclusively white? Then why (evidently) is the Education Reform Commission thus?

newsphile
newsphile

Are there no current teachers qualified to serve?  Another Hall County rep, and so many charter and private school reps that one could easily believe the contracts have already been signed.  When people in control, regardless of party, truly want to do what is best, they seek input from the best sources. Even party affiliation takes a back seat.  When we realize that no party is always right and no party is always wrong and stop appointing our friends and supporters instead of the most qualified invidiuals, maybe we can begin to see real progress. Political arrogance, corruption, and greed are destroying our state and our country

MiltonMan
MiltonMan

The GAE & PAGE clowns supported the moon bat Jason Carter.  They will lucky to have representation of the board - rightfully so.


The successful schools in North Fulton will get dumped on with unproductive students.  Thanks Shady Deal.

EdUktr
EdUktr

@MiltonMan

Unlike GAE, PAGE doesn't endorse candidates or fund their campaigns. Which is why PAGE has twice as many members.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@MiltonMan But North Fulton's outstanding schools and incredible teachers will turn them around, won't they?  Because it is the school and the teachers that make a difference, NOT the students and their parents.

historydawg
historydawg

@EdUktr @MiltonMan PAGE has twice as many members because it is substantially cheaper to join. Period. Most people join simply to have access to legal services.

William1952
William1952

I don't think there are enough members on the commission. Fifty or seventy five more would be much more efficient.

Antagonist
Antagonist

@William1952  Totally. Then we will know absolutely for certainly sure why nothing positive will be accomplished.

Falcaints
Falcaints

Once again, only one person who actually teaches.  Another waste of time and money.

Antagonist
Antagonist

@MarkFelt @Falcaints  They don't want real teachers on this committee. That would complicate the corporate approach to Deal's education philosophy for Georgia.

living-in-outdated-ed
living-in-outdated-ed

I think the list is weak - at least the folks who are not educators and politicians could have been a bit more credible. I agree with @Wascatlady that we need to see photos and get a sense at diversity.   I think we should also understand the rationale behind the makeup of the commission and what the qualifications were.   Why not bring in any of out state policy wonks?  I'm sorry, but I could very easily compile a list of some education experts who could add tremendous value to this commission.   In addition, the list is too long.  

newsphile
newsphile

@concernedoldtimer  Appointed by the board, I could support.  Appointed by a governor, no!  We've seen how those appointments work.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

Could you run photos of the appointees?  Interested in the "diversity."  Obviously not many women--less than a third.  Whatcha want to bet the members will look a lot like our "representatives?"

Astropig
Astropig

@Wascatlady @Astropig


I think the board will do a good job. Marginalize yourself and your cause if you choose,but it's going ahead with or without you.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

Where are the teacher representatives?  Reform seems to focus solely on how to make "teachers" accountable, so why are there not more teachers serving on this commission? 

dg417s
dg417s

Of P-12 children?

Astropig
Astropig

@Quidocetdiscit


"why are there not more teachers serving on this commission? "


Because the governor picks the commission and gets to name the members. Finally, there is a voice for parents/teachers/taxpayers that want a different approach that involves parental empowerment. I don't remember any Democrat governor giving that kind of voice to parents in the past.

Astropig
Astropig

@newsphile @Astropig @Quidocetdiscit


It's always dangerous to predict a future that will never happen, so I'll speculate:


If Jason Carter had won the election,there would probably been the same proportion of insider,union-lite hacks and political fixers that would have been appointed to see how they could direct more resources to the people that already get most of them in public education. I'll further speculate that the same Oompa Loompas on this board that are dissin' Deal would applaud little Jason as being on the cutting edge of true school reform.


That's what I would speculate.

newsphile
newsphile

@Astropig @Quidocetdiscit  I'm not so sure it's parents the governor is giving the voice to here.  Looks more like charter school promoters and politicians, for the most part.  I am disappointed, but not surprised, that someone involved with New Orleans school is included.  We all know that one isn't working well. 

dg417s
dg417s

Well, let's see.... one actual classroom teacher on a commission on educaiton reform.  Certain bloggers here keep accusing teachers of resisting reform (and you can't say that I am one of those, I say reform this reform because it hasn't worked).... but this is just another example of reform being done to us and our students rather than with us.  You would get more teacher buy in if the teachers had a true voice.  It isn't here.

Astropig
Astropig

@dg417s


Teachers had a chance to elect their guy governor. They made their choice and got behind Jason Carter. He lost (you may have seen the story in the paper). Now Governor Deal gets to do his version of reform because he won (also in the paper). In our binary system of government,the winning side does their thing and the losing side tries to win the next election so that they can do their thing. The Democrats did their thing for a very long time in Georgia. Now they are out of power and will have to do what a majority of voters want in order to do their thing again.


Sorry,but the winners don't have to do the bidding of the losers. That's just the way it works.

Astropig
Astropig

@dg417s @Astropig


I hear you, BUT...


The fact is, a lot of people warned the teachers that by going all partisan and backing a doomed candidate,they would have NO voice in policy if Deal prevailed. It should have been a clear warning when John Barge didn't break double digits in his own party primary that voters want a different approach to education. (I'll add that the charter/choice candidate for state SOS did pretty well on the Democratic side in her primary,but ultimately lost). 


So now,here we are. The campaign is over and the winners have to actually govern. They really have no choice but to interpret their landslide victories as a validation of what they ran on. Despite what you'll read here for the next little bit, teachers are themselves far from united in what they feel needs to be done to improve education.I'm sensing that you think that one or two teachers can speak for all of them in the shaping of policy. I don't believe that and I hope you don't either.

Here's where the rubber meets the road.Democrats talk a good game about "bipartisanship" and getting along and "reaching across the aisle". Well, here is their chance. The voters put the Republicans in the drivers seat and the Dems can reach across and do what the voters want or just be obstructionist and thwart the will of the people and possibly be locked out of power fro another 20 years.


Choose wisely.

Astropig
Astropig

@Wascatlady @Astropig @dg417s


Well, you could have elected your guy and he would be doing your version of reform right now and I would be making the bitter,hateful comments. But alas, the shoes are on the other feet.

Dismuke
Dismuke

@Astropig @dg417s Teachers would have no voice with Deal regardless.  And if you think it's a good idea to try to "reform" education without giving a voice to those doing the educating--oh, wait you do.  Sorry.  I almost misoverestimated you.  I'll try not to let it happen again.

Astropig
Astropig

@Dismuke @Astropig @dg417s


Hey, nothing stopping you from electing your own peeps and doing it your way.


Call the whaaaaaammmmbulance,the libs don't like the way things are being done.

dg417s
dg417s

@Astropig @dg417s You're right - Governor Deal won.... that's not the point.  He isn't the one doing the work.  I saw that one teacher's group has one representative on it - a group formed out of Cobb County that endorsed him.  As I've said countless times, until Sonny Perdue was elected our current bunch of Republicans called themselves Democrats, so the current Dems aren't the ones that screwed up education in this state.  


I will leave you with this thought - one of the standards that I have to teach, and am working on this week in my course - is for students to compare and contrast command versus market economies.  What are advantages and disadvantages of each.  Since we are dealing with public schools, that falls under the realm of "command" economies.  Advantage - changes can happen very quickly.  Disadvantage - the wants and needs of consumers are often ignored.  The people making the decisions are too far removed from the actual practice to really effectively make the decisions.  That's why Soviets waited in lines for hours for toilet paper and size 9 brown shoes.


I am not advocating vouchers in any way shape fashion or form, but what I am saying is that excluding the people doing the work is not wise.  Yes, change needs to happen, but it is doomed to fail if it is done too far from the problem.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Astropig @dg417s Can't wait till we put ditch diggers in charge of medical procedures.  After all, EVERYONE has had their temperature taken at one time or another!