Georgia picks fight with College Board over AP history. Guess who loses again? Our children.

Both my twins are in AP U.S. History this year, and I’m impressed with the depth of the course. They are learning far more about American history than I ever did.

No hedThey are being taught more than dates and names. Their assignments require they look beyond what happened to why, how and the long-term consequences.

The goal of the class is understanding our history, the good, the bad and the ugly — and America has it all.

But a resolution in the state Senate – sponsored by the same coastal lawmaker who attempted last year to not only rid Georgia of Common Core, but of any test or class that reflected a national effort – calls for AP U.S. History to be outlawed if the College Board does not present a more sanitized view of American history.

The resolution states:

WHEREAS, approximately 14,000 Georgia students take the College Board’s Advanced Placement U. S. History (APUSH) course each year; and WHEREAS, the APUSH course has traditionally been designed to present a balanced view of American history and to prepare students for college-level history courses; and WHEREAS, the College Board has recently released a new framework for the APUSH course; and WHEREAS, the new APUSH framework reflects a radically revisionist view of American of American history that emphasizes negative aspects of our nation’s history while omitting or minimizing positive aspects; and WHEREAS, the framework minimizes discussion of America’s Founding Fathers, the principles of the Declaration of Independence, the religious influences on our nation’s history, and many other critical topics that have long been part of the APUSH course; and WHEREAS, the framework presents a biased and inaccurate view of many important themes and events in American history, including the motivations and actions of seventeenth to nineteenth century settlers, the nature of the American free enterprise system, the course and resolution of the Great Depression, and the development of and victory in the Cold War; and

WHEREAS, the framework differs radically from the Georgia Performance Standards for Social Studies; and WHEREAS, despite offering revisions and clarifications to the framework, the College Board has made no substantial changes to the themes and key concepts of the framework, thus requiring all content to be taught in alignment with those themes and concepts;

That the State Board of Education instruct the College Board to return to an APUSH examination that aligns with the restored APUSH course and that respects and incorporates the Georgia Performance Standards;

That if the College Board does not comply with these requests, the State Board of Education and the Georgia Department of Education cease expending any state funds on professional development activities, textbooks, or other instructional materials aligned to APUSH; That if the College Board does not comply with these requests, the Georgia congressional delegation is urged to push for reduction or elimination of federal funding for the College Board;

That if the College Board does not comply with these requests, the Governor is directed to contact other governors of several or all states to join Georgia in its suspension of funds to the College Board; and That if the College Board does not comply with these requests, the State Board of Education and the Georgia Department of Education are directed to explore alternatives to the College Board’s Advanced Placement program that would allow Georgia students obtain college credit by mastering the content dictated by Georgia standards and that the Governor would seek reciprocity among several or all states and urge them to do likewise.

In supporting the resolution, new state school chief Richard Woods continues his mantra about standards that are “Georgia-owned and Georgia-grown.”

I often get emails from newcomers interested in my view of metro school districts. Coming here from states with higher average school performance, they worry about the quality of schools, both public and private, in Georgia.

As an editorial writer, I talked to CEOs of companies newly relocated to Georgia who explained, while their transferring employees were thrilled with housing prices in Georgia, they were wary of the schools. I have also had folks in the tech industry tell me the reputation of Georgia schools dissuades some top innovators from bringing their expertise and their start-ups here.

“Georgia grown and owned” doesn’t impress people when they look at how the state fares on national comparisons. The slogan may make for good politics, but it doesn’t make for good schools.

If Georgia students led the world in academic performance, I would say puff, posture and preen all you want about Georgia owned and grown.

But we don’t lead the world or the country. We never have.

Like the rest of the South, Georgia has never been an academic leader, an outcome of entrenched poverty and an indifference to the importance of an educated populace.

Now, we are trying to shed that past and improve the odds for our children.

So, we ought to be studying the states and nations that outperform us and learn. Our children will be competing with students from those places for jobs. They have to be on equal footing.

Georgia is attempting to improve its schools, although politics keeps derailing the progress. Taking on the College Board over APUSH makes us look provincial.

And I will bet a latte and apple fritter the only states willing to pull their students out of AP are other low-performing ones. Parents in Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Jersey – with higher AP participation and college-going rates– would not tolerate state lawmakers meddling with their children’s academic futures.

APUSH is not mandated in Georgia. It’s a choice, typically made by high-performing students eying UGA, Tech or a select private college.

I don’t understand why the Legislature is meddling in AP courses since they have no control over content. I guess they got tired of politicizing the Georgia curriculum.

In writing about schools in Georgia since 1997, I have seen few instances of where General Assembly interference benefited students. In the last few years, most of the General Assembly’s actions have been designed to appease special interests, not help students. Lawmakers are not looking to make progress; they want to make points.

This is another example.

Here is Richard Woods’ statement in support of Senate Resolution 80:

“I am in agreement with Governor Deal and the State Board of Education that our Social Studies – and Science – standards must be Georgia-owned and Georgia-grown. We will conduct a full review of our Social Studies standards to ensure that they have proper focus on the Founding Fathers, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and all aspects of American History.  We will also forge partnerships to supply every 5th grader in Georgia with a pocket Constitution so the foundations that built our great country are easily accessible to them.

I have deep concerns regarding the College Board’s new Advanced Placement U. S. History (APUSH) framework and testing. I fully support SR 80’s move to ensure that Georgia’s students are being taught using the very best history standards possible. Any opportunity for our academic or our nation’s historical integrity to be eroded must not be allowed.

One important issue to note in Georgia is that all students, including our Advanced Placement (AP) students, must take the state end of course test in U.S. History. That means, regardless of what may be missing from the AP frameworks, our students will be taught the foundational principles found in our Georgia standards and will be required to demonstrate that knowledge on our state test.  This will provide our state the ability to address some of the APUSH shortcomings.  However, more must be done.

Though this is a short-term solution, SR 80 provides steps to address the long-term problem of high school students not being taught key people, events, and documents that are the cornerstone of the history of our nation. I applaud the members of our General Assembly for working together to protect the education of Georgia’s students.”

And here is the College Board’s response to this effort:

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program has a 60-year history of delivering excellence in education to millions of students across the country.

College faculty and AP teachers collaborate to develop, deliver, and evaluate AP courses and exams. Their partnership ensures that these courses align with the content and rigor of college-level learning, while still providing teachers with the flexibility to examine topics of local interest in greater depth.

Because they trust AP, more than 3,300 colleges and universities across the globe use AP Exam scores for credit, placement, or consideration in the admission process.

At the root of current objections to this highly regarded process is a blatant disregard for the facts. Despite the principled engagement and unwavering cooperation of the College Board in addressing concerns, the most vocal critics have prioritized their own agenda above the best interests of teachers, students, and their families.

The redesigned AP U.S. History course and exam have the highest support of the history profession, with strong endorsements from the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the National Council for Social Studies, and the National Council for History Education. As important, the redesigned AP U.S. History course has received overwhelming support from AP teachers nationwide, and is currently in use in classrooms across the country. The College Board has the greatest confidence that AP U.S. History teachers understand how to reflect state and local requirements and the great story of America in their instruction.

In the face of these attacks on our long-standing and highly respected approach to developing college-level courses, AP teachers and students, our member institutions, and the American people can rest assured: The College Board will not compromise the integrity of the Advanced Placement Program.

 

Reader Comments 0

122 comments
Meghan Cooper
Meghan Cooper

I think Montel Williams said it best in regards to the Oklahoma ruling. - "Attempting to ban AP United States History because the curriculum RIGHTLY teaches kids where America might have done better is oddly reminiscent of the way education is approached in North Korea.

AJC_Ryaks
AJC_Ryaks

First comment is that this website is not friendly to tablets nor smart phones. But on the subject, since I do not have a student in college or high school, I do not have a lot of knowledge or strong opinion on the subject. But it seems to me that there should be some sort of commonality in what is taught. In my opinion we are starting with the wrong question. What we should ask ourselves is what product we want the education system to turn out. As a citizen and a taxpayer what I would like is someone who can intelligently participate in our democracy and has the foundation of knowledge and skills and motivation to make a useful contribution to our community (which is our world, nation, state and local community). In light of that, it stands to reason some common core of knowledge and understanding of history is needed. Therefore taking into account that I am basically ignorant on this subject, I support the College Board with respect to history testing. Having said that I also support teaching and testing Georgia history. After all, how can one be educated in Georgia without a knowledge of Georgia history? The fact that a Georgia legislator has introduced such a piece of legislation shows that he has no understanding of some basic Constitutional principles. For example, freedom of religion is not someone's freedom to impose his religious views on someone else. Rather, it is the freedom to worship or not worship as you please without interference from the government.

NewName
NewName

@AJC_Ryaks - Students take GA History for an entire year in 8th grade.


ConcernedDeKalbMom
ConcernedDeKalbMom

This governor, this school superintendent, are not interested in educating our children for the future. They are mired in the past. They want education to be the way it was when they were kids. "Georgia-grown, Georgia-owned" has nothing to do with making our children ready for challenges that we cannot even begin to imagine in their work future. 

lexga
lexga

How did Richard Woods become head of the Georgia State School Board? We (I am from Georgia, live here and went to UGA) have been close to the bottom of the education barrel forever. Shouldn't Mr. Woods be more interested in improving our children's education rather than spewing trite little phrases like Georgia Owned and Georgia Grown? When I hear people like him and legislators which make these ludicrous proposals it's easy to see why along with Mississippi and Alabama we are the brunt of so many jokes from the rest of the country. God help us. It's clear we don't have the judgment needed to elect people who can help us. 

Caius
Caius

Duke 14: "The US Constitution is the culmination of 200 years of Puritan political thought."

Make that 1367 years of Western Political Philosophy and you are more correct. See "City of God" by Augustine of Hippo on the role of government in a civil society as a starter.


Also, read the actual United States Constitution, you will find that it is the most Religion Neutral national constitution in existence.  That is religion neutral, not pro religion or anti religion. As Ben Franklin noted when changing Jefferson's language in the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson's language "smacked of the pulpit",

and they did not want that in the Declaration.  So they took it out!








giveitup
giveitup

I rarely comment on this blog because of the negative, self-serving, and disrespectful bloggers who monopolize this forum.  I am, however, moved to speak in support of you, Maureen.  I took AP US History in high school, a two-year course that changed my academic life and made me more of a thinking person.  It did not matter what the curriculum was...I learned to read different points of view and make my own decisions and judgments.  My late father was appalled at the point of view I often subscribed to, but it was all a learning process.  I am now a retired teacher, and I still remember the outstanding teachers I had in that course, who taught me to express myself after due consideration of many points of view, reading of primary sources and the writings of historians.  Maureen, I often wonder how you keep doing your wonderful work, when so many commenters are so reactionary and disrespectful.  Thank you for all you do...I mean it from the bottom of my heart.

Cere
Cere

All I'm really saying is that if we can really get past the race issue and do as MLK wished - judge people by their character as individuals - only then we can begin to make real progress. As long as race serves as an invisible wedge, Georgia will continue to lag in so many areas. Racism is our biggest drag. We need to put it away and move on.

newsphile
newsphile


Richard Woods may have been a good teacher and a good curriculum director in a small district setting, but it's quite a leap from there to State School Superintendent. I would think there is a lot of catching up to do.

According to GADOE's website, Irwin County had 80 graduates in 2014.  The 66.7% graduation rate was below the state's average of 71.5%. The system has one elementary school, one middle school, and one high school.  There are fewer than 1,800 students enrolled in the school system of which 37% are minority . There is no mention of any AP courses in the school's curriculum, which is understandable for a system this small.

I'm pulling for Woods to make the adjustment to his new job and to make it quickly.  Our students and all of GA have a lot to lose, if Woods becomes just another politician. 



Militaryspouse1966
Militaryspouse1966

@newsphile He must have some political chops to go from a tiny district to lord of the education  realm!  Wish he KNEW something about education. 


Cere
Cere

I will say, my nieces and nephews in Ohio public schools not only took AP courses and got credit, but two of them actually attended a nearby university (not a tech school - a university) and got a full year of college under their belts as seniors in high school. They didn't even go to their high school their entire senior year.  And 3 of the 4 got full ride scholarships to very nice private colleges.  One is a very successful musician, another is a very successful filmmaker, and one has a patent on a medical device. Yes - they all got their base in a regular public school. [Small district]

duke14
duke14

What do your twins learn, Maureen? That Americans are racist, imperialistic warmongers who oppressed Indians and Blacks, and who exploited the third world? I will tell you what they do not learn. In 1843 the French intellectual Alexis de Tocqueville spent a year touring the US, trying to understand why our revolution succeeded at establishing liberty, while the French failed. He concluded that it was because of our religious mores. "I do not know whether all Americans are sincere about their religion," he wrote, "for who can know the heart of a man; but I am certain that they hold it to be indispensable for the maintenance of republican principles." Christianity has always been the defining characteristic of America. John Adams said, "Our Constitution is designed for a moral and a religious people. It is wholly inadequate for the governance of any other." In his Farewell Address, George Washington reiterated the principle that a strong public religion is necessary for republican government. He said that "a volume would not suffice" to enumerate the proofs of this fact, but you will not find this fact in a modern history curriculum. For modern historians, the defining event in American history is the Civil Rights movement of the 1960's. This curriculum is produced by aging radicals from that movement who deliberately set out to destroy everything America has always stood for. The extent to which they have succeeded is shown by the fact that rather than being ex-convicts, they are education professors shaping the minds of future generations. Under the influence of decades of socialist education, we have twice elected a President who campaigned on a promise to "fundamentally transform America".

The US Constitution is the culmination of 200 years of Puritan political thought. It is based on the Christian concept of man's utter depravity apart from God's redeeming grace. Christ sets us free from sin so that we can obey God. James Madison said, "Liberty means we are free to do what we ought to do." The French Revolution was based on the Enlightenment concept of the innate goodness of man. Autonomous human reason sets us free from God's authority, so that we become slaves of sin.  Today the Enlightenment is called secular humanism. Revolutions based on that optimistic assessment of human nature follow a standard pattern. Violent social upheaval develops into full-blown riotous anarchy, culminating in absolute tyranny under martial law. That happened in the revolutions of France, Russia, China, and Cuba, to name but of few out of many. It almost happened in the US during the 1960's, and it is happening in the US now. It did not happen in the American Revolution of 1776 because the men who fought that Revolution were governed by the moral discipline of the Christian religion.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@duke14 

I quite agree here with living-in-outdated-ed, and will only add that this is a peculiar version of American and French history.


The Puritans may have landed here in 1620 on the Mayflower Compact, but they certainly had little to do with our Constitution. None of the Founding Fathers were Puritans, though quite a few were Deist (including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson). Deism was a wide-spread 18th century religion that was not Christian at all since it did not teach the dogma of the Trinity. The U.S. Constitution was more closely based on the political thought of John Locke who held that "government rests on the consent of the governed."  Are you familiar with its First Amendment, that provides for freedom of religions? Oh, and perhaps are you familiar with Thomas Jefferson's "Bible, or the Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth"? He rewrote the NT to exclude all passages referring to the divinity, miracles, and resurrection of Jesus.


But the funniest part of this post is the declaration that the French Revolution was based on Enlightenment ideas. You can't connect this Revolution with the Enlightenment which held that man could govern through his reason--this bloody upheaval by peasants and workers that guillotined the monarchy and royalists, as well as the French clergy.

redweather
redweather

@OriginalProf @duke14  Not so sure I would call Deism a religion. (Quibble alert!)  Deists didn't question the existence of God; they questioned much of the rigamarole that had grown up around it. For example, in Part II of his Autobiography Ben Franklin discusses how his reading of a book railing against Deism turned his thinking in that direction.  He also thought his minister spent too much time telling him how to be a good Presbyterian as opposed to being a good person.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@redweather @OriginalProf @duke14 

Quibble alert duly noted. I would consider Deism a religion since Deists believed in an impersonal God that created the universe according to scientific laws which man's reason can discern, and then withdrew to let it run without interference. They just didn't believe in the doctrine of the Trinity, in a Christ, in the necessity of a church for salvation, in grace, in original sin, all that "rigamarole." They considered that ethical living was the most important part of Deistic worship of God, as I gather B. Franklin did as well as T. Jefferson with his revised "Bible."

living-in-outdated-ed
living-in-outdated-ed

@duke14 I think your view of history is fundamentally flawed.  It is not based on 200 years of Puritan thought.  If you studied your history, it is based on the Roman Empire, Egyptian Empire, the views of the Philosophes, and many other sources.  You have conveniently forgotten the freedom of religion in the Bill of Rights, the separation of church and state, and many other key elements.  I'm sure the many historians and history teachers who read this blog can cite all of the historical details you have either omitted or misinterpreted.  But I can tell you unequivocally that if you truly believe what you have penned, that you are hopelessly misguided and I feel sorry for your children if that is the lens through which you instruct them to study and interpret U.S. History.

Cere
Cere

Or is it 'toes' a line... ? Not an English major...

Cere
Cere

What I have learned since moving here from Ohio over 30 years ago, is that every single decision in Georgia is made with some kind of racial perspective. The racial divide is almost incalculable and growing.  Public money is perceived by white 'leaders' in the state as money to be spent on public parks, schools, healthcare, etc for blacks and poor whites. Therefore, as little as possible is spent. Whites in power for the most part, do not partake of publicly funded things - they belong to private country clubs, send their children to private schools, eat at pricey, private restaurants and live in private, gated communities.  [I've told stories before about playing tennis at some of these clubs and the young mothers there didn't even know the name of the public school in their district!] Certainly this is a bit of an exaggeration, and there are people of both races that meet in the middle - but only occasionally - especially when compared to most other states. But these few in the middle are the only people who can drive change and they need to bravely do so. Segregation is still the driver of all life in Georgia and most of the south. Religious fanaticism also tows a line: where else on the planet do public schools put stickers inside science books warning that evolution is only a 'theory' and creationism should be studied in science class as well?


Yes, our schools are a big deterrent to big business relocating here. But more than that, there is an undefined but palpable skepticism about politics and a lack of enlightened thinking. There are pockets of quality thinking, but those are rare, and often mocked. AP U.S. History is one of those places - so of course state leaders want it shut down. After all, Georgia is the birthplace of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. - one of the most enlightened thinkers of all time. And look what happened to him. Change agents are very scary people to the entrenched. Thankfully, we do have brave teachers who teach what they know is truth and enlighten their students - but they are getting fewer and farther between as ridiculous demands are placed on their shoulders. Education in this state is imploding - and DeKalb is the canary in the coal mine. Watch what happens in DeKalb, because it is a harbinger for the future of the entire state (IMHO).  And turning things around will be a very tough row to hoe.

Cere
Cere

@EdUktr @Cere haha. Yeah, as a 'damn Yankee' (one that stayed) I've certainly heard the chorus of "Delta Flies Daily"... but the question Maureen posed was, more or less, are children being harmed by taking away AP U.S. History and is our education system part of the reason big businesses are hesitant to move here... 


ps - I probably wouldn't move back to Ohio - but other states are certainly on the table -- warmer ones than Ohio ...

EdUktr
EdUktr

@Cere

So why not move back to wherever you come from?

bu2
bu2

@Cere 

And yet Ohio can't create good jobs.  They are on the verge of losing population.  They have 25% fewer HS students than they did in 1980.  People are fleeing.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@EdUktr @Cere


Perhaps because some of us care about this country as a whole and about ALL the children, even those here in Georgia?   


The old "love it or leave it" argument is as old as the hills, and is generally used only by those who refuse to consider change.  


How about we turn it around. If you don't like public schools, just send your kids to private schools and stop pushing for "reform".


Do you consider this a valid response to your advocacy for choice?  I doubt it.  Lucky for you, I do not consider it a valid response either.





Dr_EB
Dr_EB

@Cere As a deeply rooted Georgian and second generation product of the Georgia public school system, I am glad that you care.  There is actually a lot of quality thinking people in the state.  The problem is that those opposed to that type of thinking are the loudest and vote more often.


There are problems that are very visible, yet a lot people cannot see the trouble those problems are causing.  The entire state suffers.

straker
straker

Betsy Ross - "and trash is what my kids get instead of an education"


Get used to it.


It's not going to get any better, only worse.

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

"Lawmakers are not looking to make progress; they want to make points." Maureen hits that nail squarely on the head.

Betsy Ross1776
Betsy Ross1776

My elementary aged child brought home his/her classwork.
It was a paper on TIGER WOODS!
Tiger Woods?!
WTF?!
Tiger Woods has no business in education. He's a drug addled, perverted creep who betrayed his wife.
And he is being forced down my kids' throats when they should be learning history, yes HISTORY, not black propaganda.
Tiger Woods has done NOTHING to advance our society . He has contributed nothing to society. He is simply a rich black man who can put a tiny white ball into a tiny white hole so he can bang as many other white holes as he wants....
TRASH.

All of it is trash.
And trash is what my kids get instead of an education.


Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Betsy Ross1776


I would be curious to know more about the particular assignment involving Tiger Woods.  I do not know what grade level your child is attending, but as far as I know. Tiger Woods is not included in any of the Georgia Social Studies standards as a person to study, which leads me to believe this "assignment" was not part of the history curriculum at all but some kind of supplemental material - perhaps in another subject like reading.  Maybe the assignment was about using text features in non-fictional text, or comparing and contrasting two sports figures.  It could be the assignment comes from materials published prior to Tiger Woods' fall from grace.  Certainly, my district has not had the money to buy new texts for a while now.  If you really want to know why Tiger Woods was included in your child's materials, why don't you contact the teacher and ask?



Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

"I often get emails from newcomers interested in my view of metro school districts. Coming here from states with higher average school performance, they worry about the quality of schools, both public and private, in Georgia."

Tell them not to worry, just enroll their kids in any school with a white student population greater than 75% and they should be okay. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Lee_CPA2 

So all of the public rural South Ga. and West Ga. schools with 75% white student populations are great news?

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@OriginalProf

In your case, you should send your loved ones to a 99% black urban school.  Go ahead.  Then tell me how bad that white, rural school sounds....

EdUktr
EdUktr

@OriginalProf @Lee_CPA2

I'm sure he has in mind the majority black urban schools that middle class blacks themselves are so eager to flee.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@OriginalProf

I would classify it more semi-rural.  We do have a McDonalds and a Walmart.  That's the break point between rural and semi-rural.  LOL

AJC_Ryaks
AJC_Ryaks

@Lee_CPA2 If your attitude is reflected in the state legislature and by the governor, that explains a lot about recent actions and proposals by the State of Georgia. BTW, is 'liberal' code for 'N' lover?

satan
satan

Has anyone considered that the Republican lawmakers who spout this garbage aren't as dumb as we like to make them out to be?  I wonder if they are actually far more calculating than given credit for.  If things like Georgia grown become widespread..any parent with education and the means will take their kid out of public school. What you will have left is a poor, uneducated, largely apathetic population in public school (what exists already in many pockets of the state). What better group to control?? 

Of course, if this scenario isn't true..we are left to ponder the fact that are lawmakers are some of the dumbest humans alive...at least since man walked with the dinosaurs.

General Concern
General Concern

" I have also had folks in the tech industry tell me the reputation of Georgia schools dissuades some top innovators from bringing their expertise and their start-ups here."


I would have thought it was the journalists. Oh well, all knowledge is local, to some extent.

straker
straker

Kids who don't ever go to college don't much care for History anyway.


Kids who do and take required History courses don't usually get the sanitized version.


And, those who major in History certainly get it all.

AlreadySheared
AlreadySheared

"Georgia-owned and Georgia-grown"  - of course!  How else can we set curriculum and (literally) incomparable exams so that our state does not suffer in comparison to other states?

mrebz1267414
mrebz1267414

as a history teacher I can promise you I will not conform to any revision.  if needs be I will tell my kids what they need to know for their test, and then I will explain to them it is propaganda designed to fool them into obedience and blind patriotism.  Even if you wanted to cover up the Indian Removal Act, the treaty of Fort Laramie(and hundreds of others), the reign of terror in the south, Jim Crow, the unregulated wealth of nations nightmare that led to the gilded age and the depression, Vietnam etc. you can't.  kids grow up and they start searching for knowledge.  you let them find out that everything they were taught in school was wrong then you'll have some young adults completely jaded with the idea of patriotism

Astropig
Astropig

@mrebz1267414


Since you can't properly capitalize the beginning of a sentence ,I doubt that they're learning much in your class anyway.

traderjoe9
traderjoe9

@mrebz1267414  The question is, do you teach that in balance with what is good about our system, it's history and principles or are you a hater, a card carrying member of the grievance industry angling to get a larger share of booty via a false narrative. There is not a history of any country in the world which has not experienced terrible times. On balance, what is important for students to learn who are just passing through and not on a track to become history majors, is that this country is different than the majority of all the others in deeds, in what it stands for, and in its democratic process. Countries are like individuals, we are all flawed but unlike some who succumb to the unfairness, this country has prospered because of what it stands for. Unfortunately, there has been a silent takeover of many of our prestigious universities who are hell bent on undermining his country by focusing on the negatives for reasons one can only imagine.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@traderjoe9 @mrebz1267414



I am less likely to blame the universities for our current fall from grace than a government and military that condones and carries out torture, has eroded our rights to privacy, has allowed for an increasingly militarized police force, and has allowed corporate interests to trump the rights of everyday Americans.  


At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I suggest people dig a little deeper.  In several states, police can now pull over cars and confiscate the car and anything in the car on "suspicion" of the driver committing a crime - without the driver ever even actually being convicted of a crime.  They can confiscate your home, if someone who lived or lives in your home has committed a crime, regardless as to whether you were even aware of it.  Or take the Keystone pipeline, where Canadian and Asian corporate interests are being allowed to use the American law of Eminent Domain to take American citizens land away from them for the benefit of foreign nations.  


Does any of this seem right to you?  


Some very disturbing things are happening under our very noses, and a complacent public is allowing it to happen as long as it does not affect them.  This is far bigger than just deciding what courses are to be taught in a history class

bu2
bu2

@mrebz1267414 

And none of that got ignored when I went to the school in the 70s.  The problem is that much of the good is ignored now.

mrebz1267414
mrebz1267414

Sub in the words 'Jew' and 'communist' for 'leftist' and 'liberal' in the words of the revisionists and you have the 1937 German national curriculum declaration

DawgnIT
DawgnIT

I just don't understand how so many people can complain about the sense of entitlement many Americans share today then complain about teaching an in-depth view of US History.  I remember the propaganda when I was a kid.  Stuff like "you can be anything you want", "America is the greatest country on the planet", and "America is the land of opportunity". 


There is truth to those statements but the information that was not provided to our students is at what cost beyond the fact that America won several wars.  War alone isn't the reason why the USA is what it is today.  War only tells us about what was done to allow our government to evolve into the world power that it is today.  What the curriculum failed to explore is in-depth discussion about all of the domestic events that occurred with and in between wars.  Yeah, we skimmed over voting rights, prohibition, labor laws, civil rights, and industrialization but we rarely went as deep into the social and political issues that shaped this country and the moral struggles people dealt with in transitioning to old ways to new ways.  Talking about famous names and high profile events isn't enough.  We need deeper exploration into the status quo, why it lasted as long as it did, what events led to the drive to change the status quo, how it was eventually changed with law, and then the struggle of social acceptance of the new ways of living which often extends long beyond any legislation. 

It's no wonder why younger adults and kids today have such a sense of entitlement.  They were raised to believe that just because they are Americans that they can have everything they want without considering its cost relative to their current situation.  Just go out and do whatever and get whatever, the only cost is blood on the battlefield. Since America has the reputation of winning wars these days, there's no problem with the government seeing to it we get what we want right?

So, if you want an informed populace voting in the future, it's high time we start educating our kids on all of the things that went into making this country what it is, good and bad.  Make no mistake, there are plenty of examples of both morally good and bad events that have occurred in our nation's history.  Hiding it doesn't do anyone any good other than making Americans feel self-righteous in the face of the rest of the world.  The problem is the rest of the world is "free" to examine the USA in its totality, good and bad.  Thus, our label as hypocrites. 

It's one thing to be concerned about misinformation in the curriculum, it's another to complain because the curriculum doesn't paint a rosy picture.  I'm pretty much sick of fairy tales.  Give as much truth as possible and save this country.  They say those who don't know their history are doomed to repeat it.  Well those who think they know their history, one in which the government and its military are exclusively our protectors and providers, are doomed to live as subjects in a militarized police state.  It's happening...



bu2
bu2

@DawgnIT 


Do you have examples of only the good being taught in public schools?