State-approved charter schools are not shining models of success — at least not yet

The governor and the Georgia Legislature have pinned most of their school reform hopes on start-up, independent charter schools, which are brand-new schools launched outside the confines and control of the local districts.

Most charter schools in Georgia have not been start-ups, but conversions in which existing schools are granted greater independence by local boards of education or they have been new schools approved by the school board.

That has been changing because the state has made it easier to not only start a local charter school independent of a local school board — or even with a hostile school board — but also to secure funding for it. So, we are now seeing more independent schools, which has been a goal of the Legislature.

Here is the exact breakdown provided this morning by  Louis J. Erste,  DOE’s associate superintendent for policy, charter schools, district flexibility, and governmental affairs

Of the 117 charter schools in 2014-15:

Conversion Schools – 31

Locally Approved – 71

Start-ups – 86

State Charter Schools – 15

To encourage more autonomous charters, Georgia created a State Charter Schools Commission to spur more innovative charters outside the control of the districts. The commission has the  power to approve charter schools over the objections of  local school boards.

But a new report finds charters approved by the commission do not have a rousing track record of success in Georgia, which could mean the initial wariness of the school boards was warranted.

Or, the lackluster track record could signify these young schools are having growing pains and student performance might improve as the schools mature.

The AJC just ran a story on a 232-page report by the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement on the performance of commission-approved charter schools.

Education writer Ty Tagami notes:

The State Charter Schools Commission assessed the performance of 13 schools it authorized and found a mix of outcomes, with performance generally on par with traditional public schools.

The commission’s report did not address the dozens of charter schools local school districts have authorized, but it’s the commission rather than local districts that is identified as the charter school authority in a school-reform initiative with broad backing by the Georgia General Assembly.

The establishment of more charter schools is a major element in Gov. Nathan Deal’s proposed “Opportunity School District, “which would be empowered to take over failing schools. The law authorizing it, passed by the General Assembly with a two-thirds vote this year, will amend the state constitution if voters ratify it next year.

The State Charter Schools Commission report says state-chartered elementary schools did not perform as well as the average public elementary school in Georgia, while most state-chartered middle schools performed as well or better. The high school comparisons were mixed, with the charter schools generally performing better in language arts than in math, science and social studies.

My own takeaway after reading the GOSA report: State-approved charters don’t have much to share about elementary school reform, but they show at-risk middle school students benefit by smaller schools and focused classes. However, neither charter nor traditional high schools have much to tell us about raising achievement levels among struggling teens.

The under performance of middle and high school charter schools in STEM fields suggests these schools are experiencing an even harder time attracting effective STEM teachers than traditional public schools.

Here are excerpts from the report: (You can find detailed results for each of the state commission charter schools.) Read the report and judge for yourself.

  • The majority of state charter schools serving elementary grades do not perform as well as the average public elementary school in the state.
  • Most state charter schools serving middle grades perform as well or better than the average public middle school in the state.
  • Performance of state charters serving middle grades is particularly strong in reading and language arts. However, performance in science and social studies is much weaker.
  • The performance of state charter schools serving high schools grades is mixed when compared to the average public high school in the state.
  • In 9th Grade Literature, four of nine state charters are performing above the state average and the performance of the other five is indistinguishable from the state average. For the four schools with test scores for American Literature, two contribute more to student achievement than the state average while the other two contribute less than the state average.
  • In Analytic Geometry four of five commission charter schools perform below the state average and one performs above the state average.
  • In Biology three of six schools perform below the state average and the performance of the other half is indistinguishable from the state average.
  • Similarly, in Physical Science four of seven schools have estimated contributions to student achievement below the state average, two are indistinguishable from the state average and one exceeds the state average. Performance is also generally low in Economics.

 

Reader Comments 0

50 comments
EliasDenny
EliasDenny

Anything to abolish the public school system that don't want to fund.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

If we buy into the idea that a school (building with teachers) is some machine that can magically turn poor performing kids into high acheiving kids, then we just send all high school kids to Gwinnett School of Mathematics Science and Technology. Do any of us really believe that?


A school is a collection of a specific student population and is measured as such. All charter school students are self selected, have to work harder to navigate enrollment procedures, often require volunteer work by parents, and often require extra transportation by parents.


So you have a group of kids with, for the most part,  highly motivated, enrollment savvy, volunteering, extra transporting, homework helping parents and they still do worse than the district as a group? What's up with that?


It is mostly about the money and who gets it. That may be why you can no longer find charter school data on salaries and vendor payments like you can for public schools.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

The report is smoke and mirrors. They don't want to talk about the real numbers. Here is the relevant report (see page 8 for a summary chart). 


https://scsc.georgia.gov/sites/scsc.georgia.gov/files/related_files/site_page/2013-2014%20SCSC%20ACCOUNTABILITY%20BRIEFING_FINAL_0.pdf


The state wants to take over the "failng" schools based on the CCRPI. The state's own Charter Commission schools are failing. Of 28 schools 17 are under performing the district and 16 had a a CCRPI of less than 70 with some as low as 33. The state will have to take over their own charter schools and call them the "Double Dog dare You State Charter Schools Commision" or some such I guess.

jerryeads
jerryeads

This just reflects the decades of research already on the books. Charters on average do almost the same as the public schools they "compete" with. That, of course, makes sense: when charters are opened as experiments, some do a bit better for kids, some (actually, slightly more than half) do worse. The primary purpose for charters, at least it seems in the eyes of the shyster politicos, is to further enable resegregation -- or, too often, dump tax dollars into the pockets of their con artist buddies at the expense of kids. The research seems to suggest charters (and vouchers) do THAT very well -- while doing nothing positive for the overall quality of education.

None of that negates the reality that there are many schools serving poor kids that need better leaders and more great teachers. Delusional fantasies that hope to get something (like better leaders and teachers) for nothing (e.g,, charters) simply drag us further down.

Astropig
Astropig

@jerryeads 


"The primary purpose for charters, at least it seems in the eyes of the shyster politicos, is to further enable resegregation"


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/25/charter-schools-benefit-minorities-poor-families-study_n_3495332.html


(From Forbes): 


"Charter school impacts with students in poverty and English language learners were positive in 2009 in both reading and math. These positive results have sustained and in fact increased in 2013.


And the results are especially strong for black students in poverty. As the CREDO study reports:


“Black students in poverty who attend charter schools gain an additional 29 days of learning in reading and 36 days in math per year over their [traditional public school] counterparts (see Figure 30). This shows the impact of charter schooling is especially beneficial for black students who in poverty.”



newsphile
newsphile

Here's a for-profit out-of-state management company paid by our state taxes; entire article can be read online.  Note costs per student, test scores, and only 916 students chose the Charter, compared to over 40,000 in Cherokee County School District.

Cherokee Charter gets unexpected windfall By Carolyn Mathews The Cherokee Ledger-News April 1, 2015 12:00 am

Cherokee Charter Academy Local Governing Council (LGC) members, at their March 25 meeting, found out the school is about $1 million better off than they thought it was. 

The school, which has struggled with being more than $400,000 over budget this year because of a 16 percent decrease in enrollment, found out that they were not going to be penalized  for their lower enrollment because of Georgia’s “hold harmless” rule for the mid-term adjustment school districts receive.

“The state sets aside money for hold harmless. This is the only state I’ve seen that has this,” said Charter Schools USA accounting representative Stacey Fox, as she was going over the February financial statement with the LGC at the meeting...

“The per pupil rate will be $9,039 per student instead of $7,993 per student,” she said... That number includes the charter school supplement...

In comparison, the state QBE funding for Cherokee County School District pupils is $4,182 per pupil, said CCSD spokesperson Carrie McGowan. The entire per pupil spending total for CCSD is $7,390, but that includes local property tax funds. CCA receives a charter supplement along with its state QBE funding because it is not supported by county tax dollars...

In other business, CCA Principal Scott O’Prey presented the schools revised College and Career Ready Performance Index  (CCRPI) scores. CCA’s scores came in at 87 when released in December, but Georgia Department of Education spokesman Matt Cardoza said a mistake was made. 

Cherokee Charter Academy’s initial score released in December was 85.2 for the elementary school and 89.4 for the middle school. It has been revised to a total score of 80.3: 79.1 for the elementary school, 83.9 for the middle school and 69.1 for the high school (The school had a ninth grade last year, which has now been closed).

Even with the adjustment, the scores are several points more than the state average score of 72. The Cherokee County School District’s average score for all its schools was 77.2, with elementary schools averaging 74, middle schools averaging 83.9 and high schools averaging 77.9. Cardoza explained Cherokee Charter’s students accidently were all counted as economically disadvantaged...

cellophane
cellophane

@newsphile So, the charter school, subject to "market forces", lost enrollment and their only penalty was that the state essentially paid them a bonus?

SoGAVet
SoGAVet

@newsphile Extending my "experiment" post below, at least initially, the Charter takeaway is by spending more dollars per student (significantly more) we can raise the CCRPI.  Not the results I think they were looking for.

newsphile
newsphile

@cellophane @newsphile  You are correct.  I don't know if our state taxes rent their facility as part of this cost per student or if additional taxpayer funds are used for the charter school's costly buildings. It seems this charter school has small class sizes and still can't out perform the county school district.  Of course, corporate in FL gets their money off the top. 


SoGAVet
SoGAVet

Who is tracking the experiment?  That IS what Charter schools are supposed to be:  Hypothesis - changing X or allowing Y (ie an exception to the Rules), will produce Z results.  Thus if certain results are achieved AND can be verified by other Charters using the same formula, THEN we have valid result for the experiment.

This is NOT what is occurring.  "Charter" is thrown loosely around really meaning "different."  And many times, "different" means paying less (see comment regarding overpaid "stupid and uncaring teachers in the classroom") or firing teachers without due process.

Laid bare, the argument is more about the Legislature trying to find cheaper ways to not educate than actually improving education.

A robust Charter program would track the experiments, end the ones that are performing no better or worse than the existing model, and attempt to build up, replicate and make successful models the norm.

coj
coj

Charter schools weren't created to make a better system of education but to tear down the public school system. It doesn't matter if the charter schools address the problems of educating Georgians, it matters only in making it easier for private and religious schools to teach to their selective audiences and exclude those they don't want. 

Astropig
Astropig

@coj


Charter schools are public schools. In fact, they can be looked at as a political compromise,an educational "halfway house" between a full-on voucher system that really empowers parents and traditional "zip code" schools that haven't changed since Lincoln was president (except for the worse).But typically for the eduacracy,they don't want no stinkin' compromise. They want to control the size,shape and character of education so that they run every facet of it,from kindergarten to "Congrats Class Of 20..." 


That's why you see so many edu-saurs running down charter schools.It's more about control than anything. And they picked the wrong country to be control freaks. Americans (generally) don't respond well to being bossed around by petty tyrants.And that's why the movement to establish more and more of them keeps growing. Parents may not know what they want,but they don't like what they've got. 


They don't teach religion in public charters,they don't exclude kids that are "different" and they don't drink childrens blood like some crazies on here seem to think.

living-in-outdated-ed
living-in-outdated-ed

@Maureen, while I am still reviewing the report, I would disagree with some of your opinions about what the report did/did not include.  I think it is appropriate to only look at the state approved charters for the purposes of this particular report. What is important is to get a sense at whether or not charter schools did not seek or gain school board approval and were approved by the state fared better than their traditional school peers.   Clearly, the results are mixed.


It is equally important to look at another analysis on how the conversion charters are doing as well as those charters which have local school board approval (e.g., Drew Academy, KIPP).   For this particular report, it was to some degree a referendum on the performance of the state charter school commission.   


Again, while I would like to spend some time with the 200+ page report before opining on the details, what is clear is that the problems with at-risk youth usually start in 4th grade, so it is not surprising of the stronger results in middle school.   It is important that these charters see sustained improvement from elementary through high school, so I wonder if it is important to get a bit more longitudinal data before proclaiming that state charters are not achieving better outcomes versus traditional public schools.   However, I'm sure it's not the results that Deal nor any of the charter supporters wanted at this time.

MoFaux
MoFaux

Successful charter schools are not measured BY PARENTS on performance alone.  Most parents I talk to also care about things like racial demographic and what features the charter school provides (foreign language immersion, for example).  If I can have my child in a school with a diverse student make-up, as opposed to being 99% black OR white, I don't really care if the performance measures are a few % points off the average.

DekalbInsideOut
DekalbInsideOut

@MoFaux - Your point is exactly what charter schools are about (and difficult for most people to understand).  I know a number of families who chose to go to a charter school that doesn't perform as well on standardized tests as the traditional school they are assigned to.


Why?  Class size, demographics, curriculum, etc ... who knows ... who cares.  That charter school is better for them.

MoFaux
MoFaux

@Mirva @DekalbInsideOut @MoFaux Fine, then give me a tax exemption so that I can send my kids to private school.  I'm sure churches won't mind filling the tax gap, as I've been paying for their fire/police services and helping educate others' children for over 20 years now.  I'm tired of paying more taxes so that people can go worship without having to worry about paying for these services and to educate children.  Either provide public education options that parents want...or stop taxing me and giving away exemptions to lots of other people that don't deserve them.  For example, why in the world do seniors in DeKalb making $70,000 not have to pay a dime in taxes for public education?  What, they no longer benefit from having an educated populace?

Astropig
Astropig

@MoFaux


Very good thought starters. I've always thought that the real value in charters is their effect on the zip code schools that surround them.Their "outside the box" approach will get noticed and make the other schools re-think things that need rethinking.

Mirva
Mirva

@DekalbInsideOut @MoFaux  Parents make the same choice when choosing to send their child to a private school that may offer some other intangible benefits  from the local public school.  Sometimes it is better academics, but other times it may be teaching style, foreign language selections, smaller class size, even healthier lunch options or more family friendly scheduling.  These are all choices parents are free to make when they go the private school route.  I guess my question is, is it the states responsibility to offer these choices to parents in public school.  Charter schools are, after all, public schools and many of these appear to have become “boutique” public school with all sorts of offerings that may appeal to parents, but may in fact be academically underperforming. Parents may “desire” these choices, but it is the state who should provide them at taxpayer expense? The state is required to provide a free and appropriate public education.  They are not required to provide the exact educational experience each parent desires or chooses for their child.  That is what private school is for.


WiseSeeker
WiseSeeker

As long as PUBLIC charter schools are still under the auspices of the State and Federal Boards of Education -- meaning, they HAVE to teach to required tests, they HAVE to hire teachers who have education degrees -- from schools that are still teaching the same old and largely unsuccessful methods of teaching, they HAVE to follow tenure rules that keep stupid and uncaring teachers in the classroom forever, they HAVE to use pre-authorized textbooks and follow pre-authorized lessons and subject content -- they will never have the opportunity to demonstrate how they might ACTUALLY improve on the education system now in place.

SoGAVet
SoGAVet

@WiseSeeker Testing must occur else there would be no valid means of comparison (though as a teacher I detest how we test and what we do with the results) ...whether or not teachers are required to "teach to" the tests is another matter.  But tell me, would you go to a dentist who does not have a dental license or allow a bridge to be built by someone without an engineering license?

I'll admit, schools of education may or may not be producing good teachers, but there are other pathways to a teaching license - Education degree not required.

DekalbInsideOut
DekalbInsideOut

Question: What is a successful charter school?


Answer:  A successful charter school is a school that performs better than the traditional school down the street.

If a traditional school is the worst school in state, then comparing the charter school down the street to the state average is unrealistic.  On the flip side, if a traditional school is one of the best in the state, then if the charter school down the street is barely better than the state average, I would consider that charter school a failure.


By the standards set here, any charter school that performs better than the state average is a success and any charter school that performs under the state average is a failure.



Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@DekalbInsideOut I would argue that a successful charter school raises the actual, valid, measurable student achievement of its students significantly. That is, a successful charge  would raise the achievement of student A from below 3rd grade level beyond 4th grade  level in a year.  An unsuccessful charter would fail  to raise a student's achievement from 6th to 7th grade level in a year.


I don't think it is very helpful to measure with averages.  What we need to know: What percent of the students made more than a year's growth in their achievement,as measured with a legitimate, valid test,based on that student's trajectory over time. For example, if student X has been learning at a rate of half a year for every year in school, has the learning been accelerated to a year's growth in a year?  And if student y has been achieving a year and a half growth every year, was that child's academic growth accelerated?


It does not matter if you look at the students as an aggregate.  What matters for each of them is INDIVIDUAL growth.

bu2
bu2

@DekalbInsideOut 

That's what I'm wondering about this summary.  How do these schools compare based on their student population?

popacorn
popacorn

The less intelligent and enlightened one is, the scarier change is. 

popacorn
popacorn

@Quidocetdiscit @popacorn

You sound like Chicken Little. Of course all change is not good. But all change is not bad either. Truth is, you just don't know at this point.

You cannot predict the future or read minds, like so many edu-saurs claim. And one consistent trait of unintelligent and unenlightened people is that they think  and constantly say that they are intelligent and enlightened. Educators are generally not that educated either, btw.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@popacorn


Nice sound bite - now let's actually consider what you said.


So it is less intelligent and enlightened to be scared of a earthquake, or sudden loss of eyesight, or that odd looking mole that is suddenly changing on your arm because - you know -apparently all change is good.


Some change is for the better.  Some change is for the worse.  And the more intelligent and enlightened you are, the more likely you are to be able to tell the difference.  There.  Maybe not as pithy, but much more valid.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@popacorn @Quidocetdiscit


LOL!  You are lecturing me about being more open minded when you are the one who initially made the cut and dried statement about change?  


And then you go on to state that unintelligent people tend to think they are more intelligent while suggesting you have a better education than most teachers?


Oh you are funny!


You and Astro just keep exchanging those "likes"... your bromance is kind of cute.

AJCkrtk
AJCkrtk

"Most charter schools in Georgia are not start-ups, but conversions in which existing schools are granted greater independence by local boards of education but remain under the control of the district.  But conversion charters are not seen as groundbreaking by the Legislature, which wants to encourage more autonomous charters."


This is not correct. A "conversion charter school" is a charter school that existed as a local school prior to becoming a charter school. The parents, teachers and staff of a local school can petition the local school board to become a charter school.  In that case the school building and equipment and the school attendance zone become a charter school.  If the petition is denied, there is not appeal to the state. 


Most charter schools in Georgia are start-ups.  Most are start-ups that are approved by a local board of education and continue under the local school system. Many of them are quite successful, others are not. 


There are also state start-up charter schools that are approved by the state charter commission in the first instance or are approved by the state on appeal from a denial of a local board of education.  One really interesting question is whether those charter schools that are approved by the state AFTER DENIAL by the local school board are performing better or worse than traditional school.  Based on the schools I am aware of,  I would guess that they are under performing.  There are reasons that the local board denied the charter petitions.  But that would be an interesting inquiry.  


Finally, state start-up charters receive additional funding from the state designed to make spending at those schools commensurate with typical local schools. They also tend to receive substantial philanthropic funding.  Is there evidence that the schools spend less per pupil?  Also, what students to the start-up charters admit?  If they are cherry picking and lemon dropping their population, they will likely have a student population that is less expensive to educate, (fewer special education students, fewer students with disabilities, fewer students with behavioral issues).



Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@AJCkrtk Very concise.  Let's see how they do after"the new" wears off, if an independent audit of the students' achievements is produced.


One of the ways "traditional" public schools are failing is by being too big. Virtually all students benefit from being in a school where they are known by name.  Of course, school size is driven by  financial considerations.

keithbusting
keithbusting

The ultimate success of charter schools will be the caliber and character of the adults who attended them as students. What contribution will they make to enhance the quality of life in their respective communities? How many of them will be seeking local elective offices to put into action what they learned? Especially regarding civic pride and civic duties. Will any of the students who attended charter school become the economic movers and shakers? Be it efficient work skills or whatever it takes to establish businesses. The worst thing that could happen would be the use of charter schools as a gimmick to lure industry to this state supposedly because they were hyped as the "best avenues of education." It would not be fair to the students and it certainly would not be fair to the companies. 

redweather
redweather

@keithbusting There are any number of things that could come between a student's charter school experience and whether he/she becomes an adult with character, civic mindedness, economic acumen. Schools can only do so much.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

I have no opinion regarding educational variances at this early point in time.


However, I do see some essentially dangerous precedents being set for our representative type of democratic Republic with these words, from the article:


"The establishment of more charter schools is a major element in Gov. Nathan Deal’s proposed 'Opportunity School District,' which would be empowered to take over failing schools. The law authorizing it, passed by the General Assembly with a two-thirds vote this year, will amend the state constitution if voters ratify it next year."


If this proposed amendment to Georgia's Constitution is ratified next year, in the future, an ideologically radicalized Governor of Georgia could set his/her own "failing" criteria for "taking over failing schools."  Thereafter, he or she could authorize that those growing numbers of "failing" schools be made into charter schools approved by that future governor.  That has the possibility of politics getting heavily involved in the form of public education that will be delivered in Georgia.  That, in turn, has the possibility of turning education into a propaganda machine for the state's powers-that-be. 

bu2
bu2

@scrappy-22 @MaryElizabethSings 


And yet the least educated are the most Democratic demographic.


Really, you look so uneducated spouting off this sort of stuff.  Mindlessly spouting off the stuff you see on MSNBC I guess?

Astropig
Astropig

@bu2 @scrappy-22 @MaryElizabethSings


@bu2 

With their mentality, it may be another generation of Republican political ascendancy.They obviously think voters are only smart when they elect their pet nutcases.

scrappy-22
scrappy-22

@MaryElizabethSings "the possibility of turning education into a propaganda machine for the state's powers-that-be"


um... too late! 

You know the voters of this state will ratify it, because that is what the GOP wants. All they hear is 'failing schools will be taken over' and assume this is a good thing.  When in fact, you are correct, that this is just a way for the Gov to take over schools (at will), with no promise of what will happen to them or how they will be fixed, or even how they were failing. 


But, that is all part of the GOP master plan isn't it? Destroy public education & keep the populace uneducated so they can continue to win elections!  (am only half kidding there... ) 

Gwinnetting
Gwinnetting

It's encouraging that charters have already matched or in some instances exceeded results of traditional public schools—after only a few years in operation. 

Obviously, innovations in education are needed and traditional public schools haven't found the right mix, despite a half century or more of ballyhooed schemes and promises.

Here's to the spirit of reform!



Astropig
Astropig

@Gwinnetting


Right-o! Seeing as most start up charters do what they do for a lot less money per student, they are performing the equivalent of turning water into wine. Coming on the heels of the Duke U. report earlier that shows that,over time, charter schools improve student achievement,the future is so bright that we really need some good shades!

Astropig
Astropig

@Quidocetdiscit @Gwinnetting


Of course you see it that way.There is no piece of news that will ever emanate from charter schools that you won't find as a negative. Fortunately, from a single school experiment in (in 1992),the charter movement has grown like Topsy,despite the resistance of the diadochi in the old school establishment. The only people that love them are the millions and millions that use them. The charter waiting list continues to grow,there has now been a generation of kids that have passed through them and even the systems are retrenching against this growing tide by taking on the "charter" appellation for their schools and systems that want a waiver from the more onerous state and federal mandates so that they can remain viable. Charters don't need "talking points" any more. Better get up to date there, kiddo.

flaneur_
flaneur_

@Astropig 

Incumbent service providers will always lobby against competition and consumer choice—in this as in every industry.

Thankfully, legislators and voters know this. 



Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Astropig @Quidocetdiscit @Gwinnetting "even the systems are retrenching against this growing tide by taking on the "charter" appellation for their schools and systems"


You DO realize this is being forced on systems by the state, don't you?  They are required to choose one of three options.  Many are choosing this as a lesser of 3 evils.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Astropig @Quidocetdiscit @Gwinnetting


Actually, I would say the way I "see it" is based upon what was actually included in the article. Chapter schools seem to be doing a better job at the middle school level but not at the elementary level and the high school level is a mixed bag.  THAT is what the article actually says.  So how about building upon this - find out what is successful about the middle school model.  It appears it may be school size, which makes sense.  Elementary schools tend to be smaller.  So smaller middle schools (traditional,charter or otherwise) would provide students with better support.  However, folks usually prefer not to have smaller middle and high schools due to the costs involved.  Maybe it would be worth it, however, in the long run,

bu2
bu2

@Gwinnetting 


And I think it is telling us some things about public schools.


Except in the poor areas, public schools tend to do ok with elementary schools.


Public schools really struggle with middle school.


High schools are all over the board.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Gwinnetting


So you read this:  "The State Charter Schools Commission report says state-chartered elementary schools did not perform as well as the average public elementary school in Georgia, while most state-chartered middle schools performed as well or better. The high school comparisons were mixed, with the charter schools generally performing better in language arts than in math, science and social studies."


And you get this: "It's encouraging that charters have already matched or in some instances exceeded results of traditional public schools—after only a few years in operation."


Where as I get: Charter schools seem to be a good answer to struggling middle school students, but not for elementary students - and in high school it depends upon whether you want an emphasis on reading/language or a more traditional curriculum of broader subjects. 


Considering all the advantages they have, they should be doing much better - isn't that what the talking points say?




Astropig
Astropig

@Wascatlady @Astropig @Quidocetdiscit @Gwinnetting


I realize this well. They are not real charter schools like we understand the term. They are simply freed from some of the more onerous requirements by the state and allowed *some* flexibility from some of the more inane rules cooked up therein.They've appropriated the term, but they're providing a difference without distinction.