APS: We are investigating and punishing grade changing.

I joined “A Closer Look with Rose Scott and Denis O’Hayer” on WABE, Atlanta’s NPR station, today. WABE education reporter Martha Dalton was also on the program.

Among the education issues we discussed: The need for Atlanta Public Schools to act quickly on the allegations of grade changing in some of its high schools so Superintendent Meria Carstarphen can continue to gain the confidence of parents and the public.

APS appears to be doing so.

Here is a statement Atlanta Public Schools released tonight on what it has done and what it has sent to the Fulton District Attorney:

Over the course of the 2014-2015 school year, Atlanta Public Schools has investigated eight allegations of inappropriate grade changes at its schools. Four investigations are now complete, two are still underway, and two were deemed unsubstantiated by the APS Office of Employee Relations.

“APS takes seriously any improper grade changing or alleged retaliation on employees who seek to do the right thing in our schools. We are tackling unethical behavior, making employees accountable, and promoting a safe environment for employees to report allegations of dishonorable actions by other employees,” said Dr. Meria J. Carstarphen, superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools. “It is important for our stakeholders to know that APS is undergoing a culture change.”

APS is responding to grade changing allegations, says school chief Meria Carstarphen

APS is responding to grade changing allegations, says school chief Meria Carstarphen. (AJC Photo)

Superintendent Carstarphen adds that the district is committed to performing thorough investigations on allegations of misconduct in order to obtain solid evidence and facts that would support eliminating unethical behavior in the district.

The four completed investigations include Carver School of Technology, South Atlanta High School of Law & Justice and Booker T. Washington High School.

As a result of the Carver School of Technology investigation, it was recommended that the school’s principal receive a demotion and that the assistant principal receive a reprimand. According to the report, the principal directed an employee to give a class of students the same grade after it was believed that no one had monitored or recorded grades during the first semester of 2014-2015 school year while a long-term substitute taught the class.

The principal and assistant principal were cited for failure to monitor student performance under a substitute teacher. APS Employee Relations investigators state that the principal also failed to assess students’ mastery of performance of the class work when the principal issued an arbitrary grade to students. While unrelated to this investigation, APS recently abolished the principal, secretary, and other duplicate positions during its consolidation of small schools within APS high schools.

At South Atlanta High School, the principal was placed on administrative leave through the end of the 2014-15 school year at the recommendation of APS investigators. The report concludes that the principal changed grades under various circumstances to prevent students from failing a class during the 2013-2014 school year. After June 30, 2015, the principal will be no longer employed by APS.

At the beginning of this school year, the district completed a grade changing investigation that started in the 2012-2013 school year at Washington High School. That investigation revealed that the principal gave preferential treatment to several students to elevate their class rankings. The principal resigned June 30, 2014. Even with the principal’s resignation, APS proceeded with the investigation in order to uncover any wrongdoing.

Additionally, a separate investigation at Washington concluded that an employee made an unauthorized change to a student’s transcript during the first semester of the 2014-2015 school year. APS terminated the employee on May 15.

APS has reported all certified employees involved in these investigations to the Professional Standards Commission. Additionally, following an inquiry from the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office, APS sent three of these investigative reports to the DA on June 11.

The Washington High report on transcript modification was forwarded to the DA on June 12. While the DA did not specifically request the files, APS voluntarily provided the office with all information related to these cases.

The superintendent has insisted on complete transparency with all investigations and has directed her team to assist the DA with any questions he may have.

Reader Comments 0

83 comments
anothercomment
anothercomment

I have spent the last couple of weeks doing the spring cleaning that I have avoided for years. I am going through the boxes that have remained packed from several moves over the past ten years, This includes a very he give period about three years ago when my house had a pipe burst and the insurance company moved me in and out in 5 months. What a mess the professional packers did with my paperwork, my children's school records, their photos and art projects.

Both my kids have ADHD. My youngest got stuck in Public school starting in 4 th grade do to her father refusing to contribute. ( This child was born to a two parent family, but you can simply not stay married to an abusive person with substance abuse issues, who is abusive to the children). My oldest child made it through Middle school in Private school.

As I read the 504 plans of the Public Fulton County Middle school in the last day, it just out rages me. They were just cover for extra funds. Not a single thing on the plan was followed through by the teachers or the school. The plan clearly states that the teachers were suppose to on a weekly basis call me an review the assignments that may child had due. I have had the same cell phone number since 2001. I was always available to come during the school day or after school day, just not prior to the start of school day. I had one teacher send me one e-mail. I continually sent e-mails. Showed up at the principals office to request meetings. I volunteered. I must say, the Music teacher called me and e-mailed me. She frequently asked me to chaparone the choirs.

My daughter and I bought Christmas gifts for these teaches, I gave $25-30 gift cards plus gifts from nice shoppes my child picked out. Maybe one thank you a year. The best teacher she had, an African American Male, should have been teacher of the year. He held tutorial several times a week. After numerous years of being passed over for teacher of the year he left for the Middle East.

GT_Grad!
GT_Grad!

@anothercomment  I'm sorry that your child didn't receive the 504 accommodations that he/she needed, but I'm wondering why you didn't intervene when you didn't receive the phone calls on a weekly basis?  A 504 is a legal document and there can be repercussions if they are not followed without you having to pay for an attorney. I was in Fulton County, and all parents were given a written copy of their Parental Rights which included contact information for the State DOE and Legal Aid. Additionally, to my knowledge, we never received a penny of federal or state money to assist with 504, as it is not special education.

I have dealt with so many cases of parents being livid about things that "didn't happen for my child" 4-5+ years ago, and I can't help thinking, as a parent myself, if they were asleep at the wheel the entire time?!  You have some responsibility as a parent to advocate for your child and to make sure that you understand what is going on.

MiltonMan
MiltonMan

Great - more cheating scandals within the APS that will take years to prosecute

Point
Point

Georgia law allows principals to change grades...


§ 20-2-989.20. No teacher to be required or coerced into changing student grades; ethical violation; change of grade by person other than classroom teacher 


 (a) No classroom teacher shall be required, coerced, intimidated, or disciplined in any manner by the local board of education, superintendent, or any local school administrator to change the grade of a student. This subsection shall not apply when a teacher has failed to comply with grading policies or rules adopted by the local board of education or written procedures established by an individual school that are applicable to the grading process, unless such policy, rule, or procedure would require a student be given a grade different than the actual grade achieved. A violation of this Code section shall constitute an ethics violation reportable to the Professional Standards Commission pursuant to Part 10 of this article.

(b) Nothing in this Code section shall be construed to prevent a principal or other local school administrator from discussing the grade of a student with a classroom teacher.

(c) Nothing in this Code section shall be construed to prevent a central office administrator, superintendent, or local school administrator from changing a student's grade. Any grade change made by a person other than the classroom teacher must be clearly indicated in the student's school records and must indicate the person responsible for making such grade change.s principals to change grades...



Point
Point

@SammieCanTou @Point I wasn't defending the principal, just pointing out that the law states the principal can change the grade and the only requirement is to make a notation who changed the grade.  Paul Howard may want to review code before commenting.


I am truly sorry for you and the APS students.  It seems they hired Hall 2.0. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@SammieCanTou @Point



"The principal and assistant principal were cited for failure to monitor student performance under a substitute teacher. APS Employee Relations investigators state that the principal also failed to assess students’ mastery of performance of the class work when the principal issued an arbitrary grade to students."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


I am not trying to defend this but simply want to make a statement that is contrary to group thought, here.  In most cases, the Department Head, or the Asst. Principal, if there were no Department Head, would be the school's personnel to have monitored the substitute teacher's lesson plans and grading procedure for the quarter.  I am assuming that this was a long-term substitute hired for the quarter. The substitute teacher should be fired for having no records which accounted for individual student's progress or lack of progress in the course.


The Principal may have recognized, after the fact, that there were no grades for the quarter and no way to assess how each student had performed.  If that were the case, he or she may have recognized that the greater "evil" would be to have penalized all the students enrolled for the quarter in the course by giving them no credit or an Incomplete grade. Since there was possibly no way to differentiate grades after the fact among students, he/she may have made the call to give all the students the same grade, probably either a B or C, in order for each student to receive credit and not drag down the students as they went forward in trying to accrue credits for their high school diplomas.  Evidently, each student attended class and had no awareness that their progress was not being assessed formally by the substitute teacher.  The substitute teacher, if long term, should have known better.  If the school had hired day to day substitute teachers, then someone in the school, such as a Dept. Head or Asst. Principal, should have taken this responsibility to insure that all was in working order.  Normally, this would not be up to the principal.  Moreover, most often, the principal would not be that directly involved.  It sounds as if he got involved at the end when the problem was recognized in order to make a decision in behalf of the students' welfare.  I'm not so sure that he was the one who should have been demoted.  However, others who made that decision obviously had more detailed knowledge than I am presenting, in general, here.

SammieCanTou
SammieCanTou

@MaryElizabethSings @SammieCanTou @Point 


You're absolutely right MaryElizabeth.  In the Carver case, there was no long term sub.  Instead, there were multiple daily subs and there was no oversight.  The principal found out and intervened after the damage was done. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@SammieCanTou  


Thank you for sharing those facts, Sammie.  That is why I try not to be unduly influenced by "group thought."  And, that is what I taught my child and what I taught my students.  Think for yourself and don't automatically join in the dominant "group think."  I remember well the blacks in the Jim Crow years of my girlhood who were demoralized by group think, and I decided to leave the South for NYC in my 20s, as a result.  When I returned to Georgia, my birth state, when I was 27 and a first year teacher, I vowed never to be unduly swayed by popular fads of thought, whatever they might be.  Like Thomas Jefferson, I try to live my life by my internal sense of morality of right and wrong, even if unorthodox,


P.S. Sammie, if you, being younger than I am by far, have never seen the film, "Twelve Angry Men," with Henry Fonda about the 12 jurors reaching a verdict, I recommend it to you, highly.  I believe you will enjoy it and, perhaps, even learn from it, as all people could.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@SammieCanTou


In my core, I am a seeker of unencumbered truth and an explorer of the unknown. Thinking for myself, aside from the thought mandates of any group, is essential for me to discover both. 

popacorn
popacorn

@MaryElizabethSings

“No one has probably helped me more with my narcissism than my dog.” 

Tucker Max

Get a dog. Your 'core' will thank you. 

SammieCanTou
SammieCanTou

@Point


Point, 

Yes the law says that principals are allowed to CHANGE grades - but not to just "MAKE THEM UP"!  I believe that this statute was intended to address individual, specific cases in which there was a discrepancy in grading for a small number of students; not wholesale, school wide grade changes.  How can this principal possibly justify making 144 grade changes in a school with less than 300 students???!!!  If that many teachers weren't doing their jobs, then the principal also wasn't doing hers and should still be fired.


But good luck trying to sell that to Paul Howard and the Fulton County DA's Office.

traderjoe9
traderjoe9

SammieCan Tou has made the best argument yet for a voucher system. APS is everything he says it is and more. He didn't mention it's also a racist system. It can't be fixed no matter how the city would like to keep the high paying black jobs. Give kids a chance by giving parents the power of choice.

TaxiSmith
TaxiSmith

Race to the Top has become a Drop to the Bottom. Disgusting.

CSpinks
CSpinks

Who thinks that this is just an APS problem?

SammieCanTou
SammieCanTou

@CSpinks


No one.  So does that mean we shouldn't address it when people say, "Hey, look at this.  The system is broken and our kids are being short-changed?"

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

For latecomers, I suggest that you scroll down to some long, bitter, early posts by an inside "mole" in APS, SammieCan Tou, who disposes of well-meaning suggestions about how APS may improve the instruction of its students. His/her point is that nothing has changed since the Hall years, and any "investigations" are only superficial. 

"With regard to Carstarphen, she got more than she bargained for with APS and I believe that she will leave well before her 3 year contract is up.  APS could/will be a black eye for her..." is the prediction in the second post. 

Adding these latest revelations of the continuing sleazy culture of APS to the refusal of Mayor Reed to pay APS the money owed in connection with the Beltline tax payments, and then the inclusion of APS on Gov. Deal's list of "failing" schools to be taken over by the state and converted to charters...and I think this is probably going to prove true.

SammieCanTou
SammieCanTou

@OriginalProf


I also agree that Gov. Deal probably will (& should) take over APS.  This culture of corruption is too systemic and deeply entrenched to be removed without a RADICAL shift. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@SammieCanTou @OriginalProf 

By "mole," I meant an insider who supplied information to the outside that the organization might wish to be concealed. You seemed from  your two posts like an APS teacher without seniority who was disturbed that the culture did not seem changed from what it was in Hall's days. I found your testimony valuable and riveting, especially since I'm not an insider myself. And yes, in places you did seem "bitter" (as when you stated that you were "looking for a parachute out of this cesspool") and also angry, but I think bitterness has its place in writing that seeks change.


Thank you for writing those two posts as frankly as you did.

Astropig
Astropig

@SammieCanTou @OriginalProf


I'm putting you down for a "yes" vote on the constitutional amendment for the OSD. They've had years and years to clean up APS and it seems to be as bad as ever.I don't see how a state takeover could make it any worse.

Raja44
Raja44

@SammieCanTou @OriginalProf  Sammie, Orig Prof recognizes that you have something very interesting to say, which rings true.  Even though Orig Prof has not worked at APS, he/she senses, or his/her gut says that what you are saying is right and true.  I also have never worked for APS, but am a long time APS parent, and have observed APS for years, including watching it over the first year of the Carstarpehn admin, and I also sense that what you say in your posts is probably very true.  WE ARE ON YOUR SIDE.


I will say that I do not think that some of the problems at APS reach to all corners of APS.  There are some excellent students at Grady HS, North Atlanta HS, and probably some of the other APS high schools as well.  I would venture to say that the top 20 or so students of each grade/class at Grady measure up very well when compared to the top 20 or so students in each grade at any school in metro Atlanta, including the top private schools -- and this is without any cheating or whatever -- it's legit.  This should be kept in mind when discussing APS.  The culture problems at APS are very real, but do not necessarily reach all corners of APS -- just the parts with high concentrations of lower SES students, which granted is a lot of it, but not all of it. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Raja44 @SammieCanTou @OriginalProf 

Thanks, Raja44. I intended no offense to SammieCan Tou, and was struck by the candor of his/her long posts that clearly were based on experience of some of the poorer APS schools. Most of the other posters here seemed like outsiders with their minds set against the schools. The concealed insider's voice was very effective...and it also was good to know that those who work there are also outraged by the culture.

SammieCanTou
SammieCanTou

@OriginalProf


Original Prof, I am not an inside "mole" and I did not dispose of well-meaning suggestions.  In fact, I thanked Mary Elizabeth for her suggestions before pointing out the challenges and reality of the situation.  Additionally, I never stated that "nothing has changed" since the Hall administration.  What I said was that the Carstarphen administration was just as bad as the Hall administration.  However, I will agree that the "Culture" of APS has not changed, and this was affirmed by Pamela Hall, the Head HR in an interview with Richard Belcher on June 12, 2015.


I do not think I am bitter; but if I am, it is because the needs of the students of APS are not being served.  While I could do many other things professionally, K-12 is my CHOICE and I believe it is my life's purpose. I am also a doctoral student at one of the top education doctoral programs in the nation.  And once again, I WORK IN APS (and have done so for several years, under different administrations), so I know from whence I speak.  


Do you/have you worked for APS so that you can speak on this topic from an insiders perspective?  Have you worked in K-12 education in a Title 1 school that is 100% free and reduced lunch?  Do you have 1st hand knowledge of the challenges of working with this population?  Are you even an educator?  


Thanks for your "opinion" OriginalProf, but I am a seasoned, credentialed educator who has direct knowledge of the workings of APS AND MY FIRST PRIORITY IS THE KIDS.  I am not seeking a pay increase or advancement.  I am ONLY her to help ensure the success of my students.


ztirf
ztirf

Not sure why this is newsworthy. Grade-changing is rampant in all school systems.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@ztirf  Ah, NOW I understand!  That explains the "better educational results" that some on here have claimed.

AlreadySheared
AlreadySheared

And along with dirty rotten grade changers, is APS also going after high school teachers whose students who earn A's in classes while flunking the corresponding EOCTs?

class80olddog
class80olddog

@AlreadySheared  And since there is no longer a GHSGT, they can graduate with a 4.0 GPA and still not be able to read and write!


anothercomment
anothercomment

The public schools need to follow the lead of the Private schools. Private schools all hold back approx 1/4 to 1/3 of their kindergarten class before first grade. They do this by use of a grade called Prefirst. The schools tell them no matter how rich and fat the check they can riight it is not optional. It is usually a class of about 12-17 students with a teacher and an aid who are helped to be ready for first graded. Some of these kids have been to preschools since 2 or 3, they just need more time, or help before they are ready. I have seen some kids who do Pre-first end up as graduating at the top of their class. If they had not done it they would have struggled for the next twelve years.

This would be such an easy fix for Public schools!

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@anothercomment


It is a good idea, but it is not as "easy a fix" as you perceive.  The thing you seem not to be recognizing is that some students will never learn concepts as rapidly as their peers in age groupings, and some students will always learn concepts more rapidly than their peers in age groupings.  Thus, schools cannot simply hold back the pre-first grade students and expect these students to forever thereafter to meet with success. RATE of learning throughout the school years is a variable one has to factor into one's understanding. 


If these students find success through having been held back a year before starting first grade, they will probably be much more successful in first grade.  However, some students, some of which may have been in that pre-first grade group, may not be able to absorb concepts to mastery as quickly as the majority of their age groups when they are in 3rd grade or in 5th grade, etc.  A better way than continually retaining the same students in various grades (thereby forcing them to go over some concepts which they have mastered) is a Continuous Progress Model.  Please read my link, in one of my posts, below, for more detail.  

anothercomment
anothercomment

This biggest blame for these cheating scandals lies smack with the Georgia legislator and the elected State Education Secretary that have clearly been Republican for the past 16 years now. The clear failure is the stupid policy of only one eduction tract in this State a college tract. Sorry that doesn't work!. We need at least two if not at least three different, tracts. Look at Germany for instance they early on access which students are the highest performing University students the future PHD. Then the students who just will never be cut out for any future in college are put in schools that prepare them for strong vocational schools. Who males the Porshe's these students do but they make a solid middle class income with am month vacation. Then their is a middle ground for students who are still university bound but may not be the very top elite. You don't end up with an underclass, living off the middle and upper class.

The same happens in states like Mass. And NY. In NY their has always been the regents and General diploma. Now their is AP Regents, Regents, and General. Students in General go to Votech school 1/2 day Jr. And senior yr.

Tcope
Tcope

The thing about this that makes most honest employed people angry is that nobody has been fired. All of us that have a JOB would be out on our behinds if we pulled anything so unethical.

EdJohnson
EdJohnson

From my open email letter of August 29, 2013, nearly two years ago:

“I also invite you to go [to the link below] for my opinion on the kind of superintendent APS must – MUST! – next have, if APS is to survive and advance as a quality system of public education and as a public good.

“And, oh, if we truly want APS to survive and advance as a public good, then also APS must elect ‘Status Quo’ when time comes to elect an operational model.  Each other operational model option has system destruction baked into its physics.  Just like Beverly Hall’s ‘school reform’ had.”

[1] http://www.artofteachingscience.org/atlanta-superintendent-seeking-embraces-unconventional-possibilities/ 

popacorn
popacorn

Holding these kids to unreachable standards will create this perverted circus every time. 

class80olddog
class80olddog

No child is unteachable - IN THEORY.  But in reality, when they do not want to be taught math and English - you CANNOT teach them. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@class80olddog


Every student can learn, IN REALITY. 


From my experience of having well implemented, for a decade in the DCSS, continuous progress throughout a school, grades 1 - 7, all children in the school were continuously moving forward successfully in their individually analyzed reading and mathematics levels. I well know that to be true because my job function as an Instructional Lead teacher was to continually monitor the progress of every student in the school in those subjects so that NO child was left behind to fail.  In fact, once teachers understand how the Continuous Progress Instructional Delivery Model is accomplished logistically, it is not difficult, at all, to accomplish.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@class80olddog


Not while I, nor my instructionally-aware principal, were there.  He had been the DCSS Superintendent for Instruction for all of the DeKalb County Schools when the DCSS was the best school system in Georgia and just before he put his ideas into practice for 10 years in his model school before he retired.  As long as I was there, and he was there (He retired and I transferred to the high school level), this model school for continuous progress in South DeKalb County was very successful and a model for other schools in that county, this state, and even in this nation.  We received academic visitors there constantly.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

No child is "unteachable."  See my instructional thoughts, below, which will lead to the academic success of practically all students.


In fact, I will repeat my comments, here:


"Instead of all the finger-pointing and concern with whistle-blowers (though that is also needed, presently), why not do something very positive that would significantly change the lives of the students, the teachers, and the people in the APS community both now and for years to come? Learn about, and insist upon the implementation of, the Continuous Progress Instructional Delivery Model for the students/teachers in the APS, in which grades would not have to be changed because the students, in the vast majority, would be functioning well on their correctly diagnosed and placed levels of instruction, irrespective of their grade level assignments. And, even more importantly, they would be continuously growing academically (and thereby emotionally and socially) at a rate commensurate with their individual abilities to absorb new curriculum concepts, without having to repeat any content that they have already mastered, except for purposes of review."

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@MaryElizabethSings 

From earlier blog discussions of this educational approach, I understood that it would require extra instructors and smaller classes...additional funding, in other words. Also, some of the students would take longer than 12 years to finish, and this also would require more money.  If so, I am not optimistic about APS following your recommendations, no matter how excellent.

popacorn
popacorn

@Astropig @popacorn @MaryElizabethSings

Gather around my dear friends, I would like to tell you about a cure for what ails you, be it low grades, scurvy, one parent household, no motivation, nervousness, out of control classrooms, gout, drug use, crappy teachers, neighborhood violence, low test scores, tiredness or plum just sick of life... Yes, sir, a bottle of my magic elixir will fix whatever ails you! 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@OriginalProf @MaryElizabethSings


You understood wrongly,  No extra instructors.  No smaller classes.  No additional funding.  That was all in your imagination not in the actual practice as we accomplished it.  You did not read, or at least did not understand, my writings on the implementation of continuous progress, as I had successfully implemented it for a decade.


The continuous progress model ended in my school after the 7th grade.  I have been advocating for that model to be continued through high school for years since I practiced elements of it with counselors, teachers, parents and teachers throughout my tenure in that south DeKalb County High School, from 1984 - 2000.


I would not expect you to be "optimistic" about the implementation of continuous progress in the APS because you obviously have not understood it in any detail nor with a realistic understanding of how it works.  Your background is as a college professor of liberal arts curriculum.  Don't hold the progress of students of grades 1 -12 back with your lack of understanding of instructional delivery in this area.

popacorn
popacorn

@Astropig @popacorn @MaryElizabethSings

Yessir! I neglected to tell you this here magic snake potion also works wonders for any horse or mule discomfort. If their leg is sore from a sprain just rub this wonder liniment on and after a nights rest they'll be kicking the barn doors down to get to workin' fer ya.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@MaryElizabethSings @OriginalProf 

My background may be that of a college professor of a liberal arts curriculum, but I am capable of comprehending what you have posted on this blog about your continuous progress educational program so many times. And I distinctly remember asking you on one of those blogs about its practicality today, with limited school funding and such poorly prepared students (which is the situation of APS schools). You replied that additional teachers might be needed with such schools to work with such students who were many grades behind, and you also noted that 13 instead of 12 years might be needed to graduate from high school.


My lack of optimism pertains to the APS willingness to fund such a program, not the program itself.  They're quite short of money, as you may have heard.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@OriginalProf 


Written concepts, which are simply thoughts written down, should be understood in terms of relatively.  Again, you are very stuck on funding, it seems to me.  I cannot emphasize to you enough that there were no extra teachers, no extra funding, and no smaller classes than in other traditional schools.  The difference was in the overall instructional design of the school.  All schools 1 -12, whatever the instructional design layout for the whole school, will have some smaller classes as needed, as can be afforded, to accommodate instructional viability.


I am saying that this model continuous progress school had NO ADDITIONAL FUNDING to accomplish its goals. Poorly prepared students arrived at my school also.  The logistics were so much more complex than I can possibly explain to you on this blog.  I practiced this of which I write for a decade.


When you write of 13 grades, instead of 12 grades or years-in-school, to graduate from high school, that is theoretical thought that I would like to see implemented ASAP.  I did not actually practice having a continuous progress design through high school in every curriculum area.  But, having working in instructional leadership in a south DeKalb High School for 15 years, I know that that design is more sound than having students drop out of school and become incarcerated often, which costs society as a whole more in the short and long run than simply addressing a better instructional design through the high school years.


Thank you for asking your questions of me.  Perhaps this dialogue will enhance the public's understanding of the value of continuous progress through high school, certainly through middle school.