Is Georgia overpaying its college presidents while underpaying faculty?

Generous raises to Georgia public college presidents come at a time when tuition is rising and professors are lamenting yet another round of measly raises.

The leader of the state’s public college system defended the raises, saying high administrative salaries are essential to keep top talent. According to the AJC’s higher ed reporter Janel Davis:

The outcry was instant last month when two state college presidents received pay raises that pushed their total compensation over $1 million a year. Critics accused college administrators of being tone deaf in a time of rising college costs, increasing student loan debt and almost stagnant wages for faculty and staff. There were even calls for the presidents to return some, if not all, of their pay increases.

Despite the outcry for financial restraint, the state’s university leaders say the payments are necessary in a higher education industry that has come to resemble corporate America.

Like treasured corporate employees, underpay your college presidents and you’re almost certain to lose them, education officials say. That was the concern that fueled the increases for Presidents Bud Peterson at Georgia Tech and Mark Becker at Georgia State, who were earning less than the leaders of comparable schools.

Because higher education in general is becoming so complex and difficult, there is a market for very successful presidents, University System Chancellor Hank Huckaby told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

“If you look at the three top presidents, particularly at Georgia Tech and Georgia State, it is market-driven. These recommended salary increases, which the board and their respective foundations supported, is in response to the market,” he said.

A Georgia Southwestern State University political science professor shared a letter he wrote to the interim president of his university about the stagnant salaries of faculty and the message conveyed when administrators are rewarded and professors shortchanged.

Gary Kline has had a long and impressive tenure with GSW; he has been the chair of history and political science, chair of the Steering Committee and director for the university’s Strategic Self-Study for the college’s successful 2002 SACS review; teacher of the year; first GSW faculty member to be the Regents Distinguished Professor for Teaching and Learning and first faculty member at GSW to be elected chair of the Faculty Senate.

To me, Kline seems to be the kind of faculty member a college would want to keep. As a reporter, I have interviewed a lot of talented college professors over the years who eventually left the state of Georgia for better positions elsewhere.

Have the Regents looked at who is leaving and why? Faculty members are the heart and soul of a university, and I wonder if Georgia is doing enough to keep top professors here. What do you think?

Here is Kline’s letter to Georgia Southwestern State University interim president, Charles Patterson.

Dear Dr. Patterson,

It is with great reluctance that I once again sign this annual contract, which designates the exact same salary for me that I received last year. Over the past 10 years, in fact, every contract has been either the same or with increments so laughably small that it made virtually no difference to my monthly income. It appears the Chancellor and the Board of Regents have decided that only top administrators are worthy of pay raises.

Faculty and staff members are treated as if we are interchangeable, expendable, and insignificant. After 25 years of hard work, loyalty, and dedicated service to Georgia Southwestern and to the students and citizens of Georgia, I find myself deeply resentful of the way faculty and staff are being treated. To put it plainly, I am insulted.

I am saying what other faculty members are feeling, but may be too vulnerable to express openly. Morale at Georgia Southwestern (and I would venture to guess across the University System of Georgia) is lower than I have seen it since I arrived on this campus in 1990. Only the top administrators of the USG appear to be oblivious to this fact; or (worse) they don’t care.

Frankly, I think the people of Georgia should also be outraged. Tuition costs have risen steadily, year by year, increasing the burden of debt on our students and their families. However, I want the students and taxpayers to know their costs are not climbing due to salary growth of the faculty and staff of these institutions of higher education.

If they want to understand the priorities of our decision-makers and who is absorbing their tuition increases and taxes, they need to look at the Chancellor’s Office and the top administrators, a number of whom are receiving salaries significantly larger than that of the President of the United Stated of America.

0317artOne university president alone has been given a salary increase (yes, on top of his existing generous salary) this coming year that is $100,000 larger than the salary of President Obama.

Are our students alright with this? Are their parents who are struggling to help them pay for college satisfied with this situation?  (I know because I have been there.) Do taxpayers of Georgia believe the teachers and staff (those who actually interact with the students) don’t need to be fairly rewarded so long as the top administrators are lavishly compensated?

Do the Governor, legislators, and USG decision-makers believe higher education can be run competently by administrators alone, without a qualified faculty and staff who are not demoralized by many years of unrewarded sacrifices?

Will the students of Georgia have access to a quality of education that prepares them for global competition? Georgia is at a crossroad: will we treat higher education like a Wall Street hedge fund and teachers and staff like interchangeable cogs in a machine; or will we fairly distribute the costs and benefits of education so that everyone is treated with respect and dignity?

I sign this contract because I must,

Gary Kline, Ph.D.

Professor of Political Science

 

 

Reader Comments 0

71 comments
jerryeads
jerryeads

What a fun thing to post, Maureen. As we know, four years ago (wow, time goes quickly) I couldn't even spel perfesser, and now I are one - - - -. I take home quite a bit less than I made downtown as a gummint statistician/policy research geek. Not having to commute downtown every day makes it worth way more than the decrease.

My college prides itself on being the ONLY Georgia IHE with no tenure, which is why our start salaries are a bit higher than the norm. My four decades expertise counted for nothing, and never will in the ivory tower. I restarted at the bottom. Also haven't seen a single penny raise since I started. Few and far between downtown too, though. I work with folks who haven't seen any increase for far longer than I - in spite of radical increases in cost of living including health insurance (but very lucky to have it). That's the choice we make in this state for (hopefully most of us) choosing to try our best to serve the public good.

This is one of the (quite a few) states in which those elected to spend the public purse HATE public servants. In Virginia, where as we know I ran state testing for a while, the elected state officials held us in high regard, and, with that, so did we they. We'd go to the mat for them, and often and gladly did. My (far more than a) guess is that this had a lot to do with whom elected officials had daily contact. In Virginia, it was Legislative Services. I'd have put those people up against any policy research group in the country. It was their daily job to make elected officials look good (and, as importantly, not stupid). The mutual respect led not only to passable government but honesty about bucks. If we had it in the tax revenue and it was time, the elected folks put money in the kitty. If the economy didn't have it, we all knew it, and we'd with little ado wait for a better time and continue to put our nose to the stone.

HERE, the relationship between those in the legislature and, um, their purported support system, seems to be quite different. That's very sad, and likely does the public little good. Like Georgia's many decades of inconceivable stupidity about transportation infrastructure, I can't in my wildest dreams expect that to change. SO: You can continue to expect that the haves (like college presidents and judges in the public sector)(and by the way I think my college's president is superb) will continue to get usurious raises which (let's face it) costs almost nothing in the big picture. Tiny raises for all the other folks in public service costs pretty chunky piles of bux. Many of those elected to public office quickly become the shills of the rich even if they're not of that class, so the rich will continue to get richer, and the rest of us, including the have-nots who are gullible enough to be suckered by said rich, will continue to be, um, passed by.

Oh yeah. What does that mean for Georgia's higher ed system? The same holds for IHEs as it does for P-12 that I've seen in my data for many years. The best leave first. Because they can. The consequences are entirely predictable, and absolutely inescapable.

This said by one of the becoming rapidly fewer very fortunate. I get to retire soon and not eat cat food. No trips to the Riviera or a place on a lake, but I'll eat and have a roof over my head and good health care. I read a piece the other day that reported 47% of the population of the United States - ALMOST HALF  OF THE ENTIRE COUNTRY - could not pay for an unexpected $400 expense. At all. Four hundred lousy bucks. No cash, not even available credit. Our kids - and already so may of us - are so shafted. We do seem to be on our way to Beyond Thunderdome.

PS: You can fix this, voters, but you actually have to vote. It's not just Republican vs. Democrat. There are loons (and sociopaths) on both sides of that fence. The issue is selfish delusionary loons vs. competent individuals who actually care about their fellow citizens (not to mention the long-term survival of our country). Think. Care about everyone and not just yourself. And then vote. And keep thinking and voting every election. Pretty sure it's not too late. Yet.

Oh, by the way, CPA & Prof - the new guy in my little tiny corner WAS hired from the inside. Suits me just fine.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@jerryeads 

And I've clocked some time in what you call "the ivory tower" (never seen that, myself, for academia seems like any other corporation after you've been in it for awhile), and have only seen outsiders chosen as President. Some bad outsiders, it is true.  But insiders can come with their own problems.

Your school (GGC), as you note, is the only USG school that doesn't offer tenure... it's called "evergreen renewal," I believe... and isn't like most of the other USG schools, or indeed public universities across the country.  I'm glad you're pleased with your new President.

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

 @Lee, Dr, Kline wrote a response to you that did not post. I am posting it for him:

I’m not sure why you feel a need to strike such a disrespectful tone, especially since you don’t know me, my situation, or the full picture. If we were neighbors, you might even like me. 

Anyway, let me clarify the picture for you. My contracts are still in the $60K range (mid 60s in 2006 to high 60s now).  For six of the last ten contracts, I received no salary increase whatever. Adjusting for the cost of living, I have seen my actual purchasing power cut by about 20 percent over the past 10 years.

This is what most of my colleagues and staff have experienced, as well. I’m not alone, nor speaking just for myself. I spent 10 years earning my doctorate. In those years I worked low wage jobs and paid many thousands of dollars to get the education I wanted to pursue a college teaching career. Financially, I would have been better off had I dropped out of high school and become a plumber or electrician. While these are necessary and honorable professions, it was my choice to teach. 

I didn’t expect to become rich, but I thought I could at least live in the middle-class. In recent years, as I put two children through college, I have had to work overtime. That is how I boosted my income. Over the past year, I taught six extra classes and two independent studies (for which I am not paid). The normal teaching load for GSW is four courses per semester, so I did a great deal of extra work (15 classes and two independent studies). Preparing classes, teaching, grading, and reporting are very time-consuming tasks. We are also expected to do committee work, research and scholarly activities.  

It is a complete myth that teachers spend just a few hours in class and then play golf. (I have no time for a hobby at all, and I routinely put 60+ hours a week into my job!) However, you missed my larger point. If year after year there are no extra funds to improve salaries for faculty and staff, and if we need to push more and more costs onto parents and students, what is the explanation and justification for huge salaries for these presidents and the Chancellor? 

The Legislature and Governor should see to it that public higher education in Georgia is adequately funded for the good of ALL of the citizens of Georgia, not just the few at the top who are well-connected. Our future depends on providing quality education for our young people.  

I have friends who are having to take second jobs to make ends meet and even to sell their homes because their salaries have not kept pace with the cost of living. Some of the best people have left because they could; we have trouble recruiting top teachers because Georgia is not offering competitive salaries. We rely more and more on low-paid, less experienced adjuncts.  

These facts are negatively impacting OUR children and the State. Wake up! It’s about delivering quality higher education in a world where the competition is ever more keen. We are sinking, and I believe that the people of Georgia will come to regret the poor choices of our current leaders. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@MaureenDowney 

Dr. Kline: Please know how many of your colleagues at various USG schools experience just what you have. The blogger Lee_CPA here is routinely contemptuous of anyone who is not in business, and, curiously, keeps blogging on this education blog to inform all educators of his opinion. He also keeps informing us of the innate inferiority intellectually of all black and Hispanic citizens whenever he can.


Whatever your current salary, when I did a brief Google check-up due to Lee_CPA's snide posting, I was impressed by your Teaching Awards, and your evident accomplishments.  Thanks for sharing your letter with all of us.

popacorn
popacorn

@OriginalProf

No one asked you your opinion of anyone. Stop speaking for other bloggers, you can't even quote someone correctly. Reel in your nose. 

AlreadySheared
AlreadySheared

@MaureenDowney A sincere question (as opposed to a snide comment): open.ga.gov lists Dr. Kline's salary at 97k, but he is quite firm he is being paid in the high 60s (he certainly should know). Why the disparity - does open.ga.gov list, under the heading "Salary", Dr. Kline's TOTAL compensation including health insurance costs, retirement plan contributions, etc?

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@AlreadySheared @MaureenDowney 

The open.ga.gov lists the annual salary given, that may include any summer teaching, extra classes, or any internal grants. It's not the annual contracted amount. Note the extra teaching that he says he has done.

GKline
GKline

N.B. Please do not blame the teachers (who have been raising the alarm for quite some time now) when/if the system of education in Georgia implodes.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

What Professor Kline does not say is that his salary is approximately $100,000.  I would submit that would put him in the top 1% of wage earners for Americus, GA., where the median HOUSEHOLD income is around $32k.  So yeah, go ahead Gary, quit that paltry university job that hasn't given you the raises you think you deserve.  Take that Phd in History, (or Political Science?) and go down to the Department of Labor and tell them your qualifications and salary requirements.


But, to his point about some of these university presidents making millions, I agree, there is no reason for a GOVERNMENT BUREAUCRAT to make that kind of salary.  It's gotten to be a game, when Adams left UGA, they went on a nationwide hunt for a president.  Okay, someone tell me why they didn't promote one of the fifty or so vice president / assistant / deputy they had running around?  They probably could have done just as good a job as the joker they hired and at a fraction of the salary.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Lee_CPA2 

As I've noted to you again and again on this blog when you ask that question, that's the way that CEOs in business may do things, but it is simply NOT the way that things are done in higher education. Try to think outside the box, and realize that business is not the sole model for all professions!


Some college presidents last a decade or two. Some move on in 4-5 years. Always, the new ones are outsiders, usually from some other state. The school wants fresh ideas---most importantly, it wants someone who is not part of the good-ole-boy/girl political network on campus. Someone free of ties to campus factions, free of political debts and grudges.

popacorn
popacorn

@OriginalProf

Whenever someone tells you to 'think out of the box', it is a sure sign that they themselves struggle mightily to 'think out of the box'.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@OriginalProf @Lee_CPA2


One way you can tell that business and higher ed. are different is that Lee was easily able to look up Professor Kline's salary. You can't do that in business(you can't do it for  schools controlled by the GA State Charter Commission schools either, but I digress..). 


This transparency provides a measure of accountability to the taxpayer.It also necessitates a structured system that that has steps to climb and hoops to jump through to get raises. This structure has to be attractive enough to be an option for for competent people to pursue. Making 100,000 after 30 years, an estimated 70K spent on extra college degrees while taking on management responsibilities and teaching students seems fair. If a corporate trainer/manager for a company made the same amount of money for 30 years of the same effort and cost, would that be a problem?


OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Lee_CPA2 

P. S. I just did a quick Google check on Professor Kline, and I can certainly see why he's getting the salary he is. He's a Department Chair, and has been at his school since 1990. Chairs are administrators, and always get higher salaries; and moreover, he has seniority...must be near retirement. $100,000 actually seems on the low side for what he should be getting. The salaries of surrounding wage-earners outside his university are absolutely irrelevant.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@OriginalProf @Lee_CPA2

"Always, the new ones are outsiders, usually from some other state. The school wants fresh ideas---most importantly, it wants someone who is not part of the good-ole-boy/girl political network on campus. Someone free of ties to campus factions, free of political debts and grudges."


Always, when I see a company, or any organization for that matter, bring in outsiders in top leadership positions, it sends red flags up.  You watch the most successful companies.  They have a succession plan in place and when a high ranking officer leaves, they have plans in place for their replacement.  Plans, I might add, that were developed months before.


So yeah, bring in a new guy from outside with their "Five year plan".  They stay around long enough to run off some of your good people and then they are gone to the next victim, leaving behind an organization in disarray.  The organization now has to search for someone to come in and straighten the mess out and the cycle repeats.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Lee_CPA2 @OriginalProf 

That may be so in business...but I have never known of a University to promote an insider to President, and (counting grad school) I have been with 4 state Universities in 4 states, Northern as well as Southern.  Universities do not have "succession plans."  Oh, and I should mention that the Presidents are always hired by the Board of Regents, not the Universities.  That's possibly why they want to avoid local academic politics if they can.

TaxiSmith
TaxiSmith

These people are sucking the Hope out of Georgia students. Who's in charge here??

redweather
redweather

Average faculty compensation at Georgia Perimeter College has actually declined over the last ten years.  So although I am glad that professor Kline has chosen to be so outspoken about this issue, at least he's been getting minimal raises at Georgia Southwestern. 

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@redweather Dr. Kline sent me his raise schedule since 2006. Over the last decade, there were four minimal raises.

redweather
redweather

@MaureenDowney @redweather I don't doubt him for a minnute.  Since 2006 there has been one at GPC that I'm aware of, and that was last year.  A whopping 1.5% if I remember right.

redweather
redweather

Higher educatiuon is a lot like the mega-church business.  It attracts and rewards people who are in it for the money. 

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@redweather 

 I'd refine that to say, "higher education administration is a lot like the mega-church pastors".....

atln8tiv
atln8tiv

If you recall, many of Georgia's technical colleges were merged a few years back. We were told this was an effort to save money by reducing the number of administrator salaries. The number of administrators at my college (and others) has exploded since the merger. And on our campus, there are no less than three highly paid administrators who have been shuffled from position to position because they are not qualified for the positions they were hired for. In some cases, completely new positions were created to give them a place in the institution. And some of those administrators were given hefty increases in years when faculty and staff had none. 


So to answer the question in this blog's title: YES

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@atln8tiv 

Those administrators were probably given their "hefty increases" because they took positions with different or new job titles.  The creation of new jobs to accommodate present administrators is an old academic shell-game...You can always find some new hat labeled: "Senior Associate of..."  That's how the institution gets around the Regents directive to freeze all raises.

Ficklefan
Ficklefan

Congrats to the Presidents and top administrators now working in the Georgia University System. You have acquired the goose that laid the golden egg. You have boarded that big snowball running down a fast, snowy hill with no bottom, and growing exponentially as it speeds along. The myth that the University system just cannot find and hire the qualified leaders that it needs has been accepted as reality inside the halls of the system. And this trend is just beginning. We will be seeing $1.5 million and $2.0 million packages before long. That is how it works. Executive recruiters also have a lot to do with it. And if you don't think that utilizing this myth does not work, just look at big corporate CEO pay in the United States during the last 30 years. How does that old song go? We're in the money . . . we're in the money . . . . And boy howdy, are they!  The hook (the myth) has been set, and it will be very hard to get it out of the fish's (the taxpayer's) mouth. 


Meanwhile, due to the federal student loan program now on steroids, college tuition and fees are dwarfing inflation rates on a steady and annual basis as they travel to infinity and beyond.  Even the annual above inflation increased costs of medical care and prescription drugs is beginning to envy the higher education gravy train. Look kids. Lots of money from the feds. No collateral, low interest rates, and no payments until after you graduate . . .  and then land that big cushy job and jump start your career (wink, wink). 



BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

The BoR treats the presidents as income centers because they bring income into the system. The presidents must have their staffs of administrators to do the work.

The BoR treats most faculty as cost centers because they do not bring income into the system; faculty who bring in large research projects with external funding are treated as income centers.

That's the difference. Faculty are a dime a dozen, particularly adjunct faculty.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@BurroughstonBroch


I get it - faculty just bring in students and presidents bring in money. We can let the presidents bring in money without students to add millions of free revenue to the state of GA.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@BurroughstonBroch 

Just how do the Presidents, and especially their staffs of administrators, bring income into the university? They decide how to spend the income, that is true.  But they don't teach the students, which is supposedly the real business of the university; they only decide policies and how to implement them. What, for example, do all of the Assistant Provosts do, not to mention the Associate Provosts?

However, it's those "productive" faculty who bring in the federal grants, that pay the salaries of the faculty on the grant so that the University does not have to, as well as additional funding for "indirect costs of the research." Yet the Presidents mostly get the credit, as their Universities are more highly ranked. The faculty member who got the grant may get a 2% rather than a 1 and 1/2% raise.  He/she gets to do the research which such faculty genuinely want to do.  And the grant makes it easier to take another job elsewhere...........

Astropig
Astropig

@OriginalProf @BurroughstonBroch


"Just how do the Presidents, and especially their staffs of administrators, bring income into the university?"


Just who do you think schmoozes the legislature and governor for a bigger appropriation for their university at budget time? Have you ever seen the mailing list for complimentary football tickets at major universities? Been to their hospitality suite at games and bowls? Do you think that they kiss the legislatures and governor's derriere  because they believe in the cause of good government?


I know I shouldn't answer a question with questions,but you must know this.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@Astropig @OriginalProf @BurroughstonBroch 

What I've observed is that universities usually have a permanent administrative position called something like Vice President of External Affairs, who handles those sorts of details. He's the go-to guy who often had legislative political experience before he left politics...sort of the CEO of the University's lobbyists, you might say.

SS88
SS88

@Astropig @OriginalProf @BurroughstonBroch If you take the time to read the publicly available financial reports for the BOR institutions what you find is that the bulk of the money comes from tuition and grants & contracts (sales & service, auxiliary, gifts, investment income rounds out the rest).  The state appropriation (fund code 10)  accounts for about 25% of the total revenue for an R01 like GSU. 

So no, the faculty are not a dime a dozen, the presidents do not bring in the money, and for all the schmoozing you see going on it does not result in increased state revenue.

Again, this is all public record and available for light bed time reading via a simple google search.

SouthGA
SouthGA

They are not worth $500k.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

I can guess the tenor of the remarks to follow. All, protests in the wind. Nearly all of the Regents are presidents or CEOs of substantial Georgia businesses, and a million$ is what they're using to seeing big-time business CEOs get. Only one or two of the Regents have any experience with education at all (being appointees of Republican governors since about 2001).


Of course, next year, there will be incremental percentage raises of those million$ salaries, so........


I'm a USG retiree, and have heard of many faculty leaving who can...those can, will get out.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

GSU is a "failing school". 


Where is the outcry from the usual K-12 haters?


What, no demand for private college vouchers and tax credits? 


No demand for an OSD takeover?

Astropig
Astropig

@AvgGeorgian


We already have "college vouchers". It's called "our money". If the prez of 'Ol State U is making too much, we can go somewhere else.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Astropig @AvgGeorgian 


Not true. Tuition pays about a fourth.


http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/01/05/375222288/student-tuition-now-outweighs-state-funding-at-public-colleges 


The state funds  public colleges with taxpayer money and hope scholarships. Are you not incensed that GSU is failing at a 50% rate with SAT/ACT tested and GPA screened students? Shouldn't we demand accountability for our taxpayer dollars? I want my state dollars as a voucher to spend on private school or job training as I see fit. I want a tax credit to donate to my fave private college.

Astropig
Astropig

@AvgGeorgian @Astropig



I'm not incensed about anything (although you appear to be).And quoting National Panhandler Radio isn't going to change my mind.If you don't like it, then go to a school where the president makes less money.I think that most reasonable people can agree on what constitutes "underpaid", but I'm really uncomfortable with people like yourself presuming to know what "overpaid" looks like. As anybody can see, you run right off the rails into irrelevancies because of your blind hatred of people because of their pay or position. I have no idea what a "fair" wage for a president is, but I sure don't want it left in the hands of people like you.

Astropig
Astropig

@AvgGeorgian @Astropig



"Having difficulty understanding why your K-12 attitude does not carry over to GA Regents System."


Because they are very,very different. Public school up to a certain age is mandatory and college is not.College attendees have free choice of schools and public school attendees do not. I could go on and on,but since you've just decided that you don't want college presidents to make more than (fill in unrealistic figure), then the whole system is rotten.


Again, I don't know exactly what these presidents are worth. Maybe more,maybe less. But I'm in favor of their true worth to their universities being decided by rational economic judgement and not populist rabble rousing.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Astropig @AvgGeorgian 


I am addressing college president pay as a symptom of school accountability. I truly do not understand why the folks that eagerly denigrate K-12 education and demand vouchers, OSD, charter choice, privatization, and tax credits are silent about a college system with no accountability that performs worse than K-12 even with screened and select students. It is pretty much the same type of system. What about a market solution? No state funding for colleges - let private colleges compete for students.

Astropig
Astropig

@AvgGeorgian @Astropig


You don't understand because you just have a lot of rage at a system and reforms that you don't agree with. It's not very complicated at all. You want to preserve a failing status quo for whatever reason and reformers want to improve schools so that the kids that graduate are not a burden to their parents or society at large.



AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Astropig @AvgGeorgian

Again I ask you, why do you not apply the same accountability standards and proposed remedies to a college system that performs worse than the K-12 system? The data is pretty straightforward.Your last post amounts to false accusations and off topic cliches. I have provided clear data and explanations. It seems that you cannot explain your double standard. That's OK. Just say you are biased against K-12.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@OriginalProf @Astropig @AvgGeorgian


Astro - I respectfully and logically asked a question about the double standard for K-12 and college attitudes. You volunteered to respond. I have not called you names or presumed to know how you feel about other people. Instead of addressing the question that I presented, you instead wrote:

“because of your blind hatred of people because of their pay or position.

“I sure don't want it left in the hands of people like you”

“since you've just decided that you don't want college presidents to make more than (fill in unrealistic figure), then the whole system is rotten”

“You don't understand because you just have a lot of rage at a system and reforms that you don't agree with

“I'm biased against irrational, hate filled blowhards”


I am sorry if you are having a difficult day.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Astropig @AvgGeorgian


Having difficulty understanding why your K-12 attitude does not carry over to GA Regents System. No support for tax credits, takeover of failing colleges, vouchers and charter colleges? Why not? Both are taxpayer funded educational systems. Have no hatred of persons but do have some dislike of my tax money being misused, wasted, and spent to enrich a few while starving others.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

DeKalb County grad rate is 59%(over 4 years) with over 100,000 students - they take all students

GSU grad rate is 50%(over 6 years) with 32,000 - they screen for admission


What would happen if we gave the superintendent of DeKalb the same package as Mark Becker? After all, DeKalb has 3 times as many students, has to take all students in their district, and has a higher graduation rate.


In 23rd place is Georgia State University President Mark Becker, whose total compensation was $629,776. That figure includes a $515,100 salary, use of a car, $19,400 for a house, $22,638 in deferred compensation, $22,638 in retirement pay, a $50,000 relocation allowance and an expense account.

coj
coj

And like the corporate sector the workers pay the price for bad marketing and bad management while upper management reaps the benefits of compensation.