Georgia slows down the number of SLOs schools have to give

The state Department of Education sent out a murky release today — at least to me — on a reduction in the number of tests next year in Georgia classrooms.

The reduction will be in a set of assessments created to gauge the effectiveness of  teachers who teach courses for which there are no state standardized exams. That’s about 70 percent of teachers in Georgia.

Georgia students will take fewer tests next year.

Georgia students will take fewer tests next year.

Created by each district, these tests are called Student Learning Objectives or SLOs.

Georgia requires teachers be evaluated in large part on the growth their students show in a year.

In courses without a Georgia Milestones or End of Course test, districts had to develop assessments to measure student growth in gym, band, drama, art, chemistry and other untested areas.

Thus, the SLOs were born. Teachers are judged on the progress students show from the SLO pretest at the start of the course and the one administered at the end. The SLOs require a lot of data analysis due to pre- and post-assessment scores.

Teachers complained the SLOs took too much time away from instruction, did not really capture learning and sometimes were just plain dumb.

I called DOE spokesman Matt Cardoza to explain the changes being announced by DOE.

Here is what he told me:

Some teachers teach two courses, one of which has a SLO and one of which has a standardized test.  As an example, Cardoza cited a history teacher who also teaches civics.

Let’s call this teacher Ms. Smith. This year, Ms. Smith gave a Georgia Milestones test to her history students and a SLO to her civics class as there is no standardized Georgia civics exam. Now, Ms. Smith and teachers like her will not have to give SLOs since they teach a course for which there is a standardized test.

So, next year, the district will be able to let Ms. Smith and her students skip the civics SLO. (If Ms. Smith only has to test her history students and not her civics class, we may learn whether she’s an effective history teacher but won’t know anything about her skill in teaching civics. Of course, whether Georgia’s state tests actually tell us anything about effective teaching is still unproven.)

Now, let’s move to culinary arts. Chef Jones gave SLOs to all five culinary arts classes he taught this year. DOE says next year he can give the test to just one of his five classes.

This means one unhappy class of culinary students will have to take a test their peers in the other four classes do not. True, said Cardoza. And the class that takes the test should be the one with the highest enrollment, he said.

(I wonder whether that single class of culinary students will care much about a test that judges their teacher and not them, especially when they realize no other class is taking the test.)

UPDATE: A poster Tuesday morning asked about elementary school, saying, “Students will still be taking upwards of 6+ SLO tests in early elementary: Reading/ela, Math, Music,, Art, PE, Foreign Language, and any other ‘special’ they may attend. While this may fox the high school problem, it doesn’t fix the elementary problem.”

I sent the comment to Cardoza and he responded:

It will be grade specific. The PE teacher, for example, would only give the SLO to one grade, not all. Same goes for the other classes you mention.

In the case of a PE teacher, a growth measure is developed for each grade level.  If a PE teacher teaches grades K-5, they are teaching 6 courses. Say they are in a NONRT3 District and simply need one growth  measure. They would choose the course that has the greatest student enrollment ( say second grade, for example) and that would be their growth measure for that teacher.

Here is the official DOE statement. You all may understand it better than I did:

Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year, students will take fewer tests due to a reduction of Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) required for schools to administer.

“I have always believed that we test our students too much,” State School Superintendent Richard Woods said. “Eliminating some of the Student Learning Objectives is a step toward reducing the overall number of tests given to students, which will give our teachers more time for instruction and help our students focus on learning instead of testing. This change is another step toward a more responsible accountability model.”

For Race to the Top school districts, teachers will only be required to administer two SLOs, where they previously administered up to six SLOs. Non-Race to the Top school districts will administer only one SLO, where they also previously administered up to six SLOs. If teachers in a non-Race to the Top district teach a Milestones course (state standardized test), then they would administer no SLOs.

The SLO Assessment reduction will reduce the amount of testing in all schools and classrooms, and lessen the financial and human resources burden on all districts.

Superintendent Woods added, “We have to get back to the business of personalizing, not standardizing, education for our students, and the fewer standardized tests we have in place, the more our teachers can do what they do best – teach.”

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Reader Comments 0

82 comments
Susan Strobhert
Susan Strobhert

This is encouraging. Is this instructional method incorporated into 'charter' schools? Is it a method utilized in many schools of all kinds. Where are these schools? Interested--certainly tried many approaches myself. Whole Language--heard many opinions from posters online. It didn't matter much in the 90's what a teacher might think--many reasons--the ideas of Neal Boortz and others were esteemed. Refuse to discuss the profession randomly. If it is not yet understood that there are many aspects to learning and many issues to be addressed in order for learning to occur--then I cannot communicate with those who are certain they have analyzed every issue correctly and are empowered to know what should be done. Those who believe so strongly--welcome to seek employment in the field of education. GA State Star Teacher--Ernie Lee of Savannah, GA is a good example of the type of individual who is really needed in the profession. Attorney --held many other jobs and chose to teach.

NikoleA
NikoleA

As a teacher in a transient school, SLOs took up too much time due to the fact that you must test students as they enter.  That means a teacher has to stop teaching every time a new student enters in order to administer a SLO.  And I worked in a school where students were coming and going EVERY week.  Also, our SLOs are online.  As the computer literacy teacher, I'd help teachers by testing their students for them, but this left little time for me to teach my own content, thus my own SLO scores weren't great.  And 3rd graders took every test given at the elementary level.  Milestones, SLOs (b/c they had no previous Milestone/CRCT score for comparison) and district testing.  Scheduling all of this testing for one computer lab was a nightmare.  AND, there were lots of dumb questions on these tests.  Kindergartners were expected to type a response that would require at least 2 complete sentences.  

CSpinks
CSpinks

Something tells me that we have not enlisted our nation's "best and brightest" to help us solve our student and teacher assessment problems.


As Jimmy Carter queried: "Why Not the Best?"

BKendall
BKendall

Sad. Two reasons.

One, the SLO is the only test capable of measuring student academic growth, the same year as the teacher's performance is evaluated. 

Two, it is the only assessment administered in Georgia that measures student academic growth.

ScienceTeacher671
ScienceTeacher671

@BKendall


Theoretically, I agree that a pretest-posttest model is the only one really capable of measuring student growth. 


The problems with the SLOs are:


1) They vary from district to district.

2) They were largely created by teachers who have no experience in standardized test creation or validation.

3) They haven't been field-tested or validated in any way.

4) In some (many? most?) districts, some of the teachers who created the tests are also giving them and being evaluated on them.


#4 is a bigger problem than it might first appear.  For instance, teacher A and teacher B were on the committee that created the test. They, along with teachers C, D, E, and F, will be evaluated by the SLO, but teachers C, D, E, and F haven't seen the test, and aren't allowed to look at it.  If the students of teachers A & B show much higher growth than the students of the other teachers, and thus get higher evaluations and ratings, do you suppose teachers C, D, E, and F will think it's just a little bit unfair?

TaxiSmith
TaxiSmith

Why would any teacher want to work in a low-performing school where shr/he knows they will be evaluated on SLO? I wouldn't.

gactzn2
gactzn2

@TaxiSmith It makes the most needy schools the most vulnerable for CMO takeover. Nothing is being done about the main issues that cripple the schools and keep them from being successful in the first place.

altantamom
altantamom

@TaxiSmith

Many teachers are in low-performing schools, because that's where new teachers get placed.  They have no choice.  Hence the problem with disadvantaged students having disadvantaged teachers--because they have no experience.

altantamom
altantamom

What is "40 percent growth"?

If I score 20% at the beginning of the year, does that mean I have to score 60% by year end?  Or 28%, because 40% of 20% is 8%?  If I score 65% at the beginning of the year, do I need to score 105% or 91% ?

And yes, I have some pretty bright children, who really knew how to take tests, and could have scored 65% at the beginning of the year.  Not only that, they would wonder about the questions  they didn't know, and probably would have the answers by midyear, if not  within two weeks. 



Briet70
Briet70

@altantamom Expected Growth Target The expectation growth for the individual student is based on the formula which requires each student to grow by increasing his/her score by 30% of his/her potential growth. Formula Pre-Assessment Score + [(100-Pre-Assessment Score) * Expected Growth] = Target. Example using 30 on a Pre-Assessment:30 + [(100-30) * .3]30 + [(70) *.3]30 + [21]= 51 A score of 51 is the expected growth target for the post-assessment.

High Growth Target Students increasing their score by at least 45% of the potential growth would be demonstrating high growth. A score of 61 or above is the high growth target in the example above.


How's that for clarity?


altantamom
altantamom

@Briet70 @altantamom 

Thank you!

What this means is the higher you score at the beginning of the year, the smaller the increase in your score needs to be.  In the above example, if a child scores 60 at the beginning of the year (not unheard of for a good test taker), he/she needs to get only 12 more right at the end of the year.  The student scoring 30 at the beginning needs to get 21 more right.  Interesting.

Point
Point

Don't be fooled.  Bill Gates has recently said he is backing off linking test scores to teacher evaluations.  He

's particularly concerned with the tests that systems are created on their own (SLOs) so hurriedly.  So all the time and money  spent creating them is wasted.  We need to quit letting public education be a social experiment for the rich funded by our tax dollars.

class80olddog
class80olddog

The principal of an innovative West Harlem public school killed herself the day after her students took the state Common Core exams - which were later tossed out because she cheated,

ellie72975
ellie72975

I am concerned about the way SLOs measure student growth.  I don't know if this applies to all of Georgia, but in my district, students only need to show 40% growth on the SLO.  That means that students only need to retain 40% of the material.  How on earth can we evaluate teachers when they are only expected to teach 40% of the material???


I am also waiting for the onslaught of lawsuits.  How can we possibly justify rating some teachers on SLOs (which are written and scored in-house) and some on EOCs (which written and scored elsewhere, and are significantly more difficult)?  I hope the DOE has a good law firm on retainer, because they are going to need it!


Adding the new system announced today only exacerbates the problem: EOC teachers still have to test all of their students, while SLO teachers only have to test two classes??  I know the SLO testing is based on class size, but if a teacher has three classes of 30 students each, you can be assured they will choose to administer the SLO to their two best classes.  And, yes, there are better classes than others!


I completely understand the need for evaluating teachers, and, unfortunately, standardized testing is the only objective way to do it.  But, come on, can we at least evaluate them on a level playing field?

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@ellie72975 I raised the same issue of giving the SLO to the best class, and Cardoza noted two mitigants:

1. You have to give the pre-test at the start of the year, so it may be hard for teachers to identify better classes right from the start.

2, Even if the teachers can handpick the better class, the measure is growth so the kids may start off at a higher level, but they still have to show growth over the year.

ellie72975
ellie72975

@MaureenDowney @ellie72975

Good points, but what if a teacher has some on-level classes and some inclusion classes, which typically have about 30% special education students?  Teachers could certainly distinguish the more-likely-to-achieve classes from the get-go.  Kids starting at a higher level are more likely to show a larger percentage of growth over the year.

Briet70
Briet70

@ellie72975 @MaureenDowney I disagree--a kid who starts with a higher score has less room for growth. I had students who started with 90 and some that started with 30. The 90 student has to end up being almost perfect to show they're learning, but the child with 30 has plenty of ways to grow.


Briana B
Briana B

Cardoza still didn't answer the elementary question. If the PE teacher, music teacher, art teacher, and Spanish teacher all choose the grade level with the highest enrollment to test, in his example, the students in 2nd grade would still be taking a ludicrous number of SLOs.

Also, does this mean third graders don't have to take SLOs since they take the Milestones? They have had to in all the previous years of SLOs.

NikoleA
NikoleA

@Briana B As the computer literacy teacher, I chose to test 2nd and 4th grade.  I wanted a primary and intermediate grade, but I didn't want to have to read the test to students due to time constraints.  Third grade already had to take SLOs and Milestones.  Guess what?  The French, art and music teacher agreed with my reasoning so we all tested 2nd and 4th grades.  The PE teacher chose 4th and 5th.

altantamom
altantamom

Apparently we've decided that there is no particular skill required to create a district wide test.  Any teacher can do it. And every district gets to create their own tests because that's efficient.  Now I understand why the State does not want to pay for the standardized tests that came with Common Core. It's so much better to do it on the cheap.

Also, will new tests be written each year?  Or will scores get better as questions are shared? 

nanayh
nanayh

@altantamom For the last two years the SLO's haven't changed much. Teachers evaluated by SLO's see the tests as the students take them at the beginning of the year.  Students are tested using the exact same SLO's as at the end of the year so the teachers know the questions in advance.  They know what to emphasiz in their teaching so that students can perform better.  Teachers evaluated by standardized tests don't have that luxury. 

nanayh
nanayh

Merit pay was awarded to teachers this month based on test scores from the 2013-2014 school year and evaluations performed by school administrators in the 2014-2015 school year.  The money to award merit pay came from Race to the Top funds from the federal government.  I am sincerely happy for anyone who received merit pay this year because it was funded by the federal goverment and did not negatively impact the salaries of the teachers who did not receive merit pay.  However, I have to ask why we need to continue to give SLO's if there are no more Race to the Top funds.  Is Deal still planning to take away pay based on advanced degrees and replace this pay system with a merit based system?  If that is the case, I strongly object, as the funds to provide merit pay will negatively impact the pay of other teachers.  Also, the SLOs are poorly written and confusing.  If we are going to use only two SLO's that is progress, but some time needs to be taken to improve the SLO's we are going to use.  Finally, teachers should not be allowed to give SLO's to their own students.  Since the Atlanta cheating scandal, schools go out of their way to make sure teachers don't administer tests to their own students on standardized tests.  We should do the same for the SLO's.

class80olddog
class80olddog

And what is the incentive for a student to do well on a SLO?  Will he have to go to remediation, or summer school, or be retained if he fails it?

elementary-pal
elementary-pal

The third graders in our school will take 4 SLOs (if they are in the gifted program, they will take 5) AND the Milestones (or whatever it will be called by Spring).  Our "sound-bite" state superintendent is already planning his re-election campaign but he really has no idea what is happening in schools - or how to keep the promises he has made in regards to what we do as teachers and administrators.  He says things because they sound good, but there is no plan for implementing or evaluating his ideas. 

As long as we think a test given to students who are exhausted from testing is the best way to determine the value of a teacher we are perverting the purpose of school.  These SLOs are being written by teachers who are not psychometric experts and yet, we are treating the tests as if they are standardized.   We are simply taking instructional time away from students to determine if a teacher is doing his/her job.  How can he/she possibly do the job if we spend all this time giving a tests? 

Assessment is a driving factor in instructional planning.  We need good formative and summative assessments to determine what students have learned, what we have taught, and what we need to teach.  To think that one test  can in any way determine the value of a teacher is ridiculous.   

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@elementary-pal 

"To think that one test can in any way determine the value of a teacher is ridiculous."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

As a retired teacher, I know exactly what you mean.  The hard part is trying to communicate that educational truth to citizens with a business ken.   

class80olddog
class80olddog

@elementary-pal "To think that one test  can in any way determine the value of a teacher is ridiculous. "

That is correct - the test is designed to test what the student LEARNED, not how well the teacher taught.  What if the student was absent 90 days out of the year?  What if this is a student who absolutely refuses to learn?

Use the test to judge the student, not the teacher.

Teachers should be evaluated on:

1)  How well they know the subject matter (simple to test)

2) How well they can impart that knowledge to a willing and able student (harder to measure) 

ILoveToWrite81
ILoveToWrite81

Sooo ... because teachers don't want to have to do the extra work, a student's growth in a subject will not be determined and monitored in order to figure out if a student is progressing in the classroom. Seems like a perfect answer to making sure our students are making achievements, SAID NO INTELLIGENT PERSON EVER!

class80olddog
class80olddog

@Quidocetdiscit @Lindsaii78 "Teachers "monitor" student growth constantly through observation, portfolios, teacher made tests and quizzes, questioning techniques, student-teacher conferences, etc ."

And then they give grades that are inflated or do not accurately reflect the mastery of the material.

Why do you think we went to standardized testing?

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Lindsaii78


Teachers "monitor" student growth constantly through observation, portfolios, teacher made tests and quizzes, questioning techniques, student-teacher conferences, etc .  We do not need to use some poorly designed, one size fits all. "standardized" test given at the END OF THE YEAR (which means we cannot use the resulting data to make any meaningful changes to a child's instruction) to determine their progress.  


And it is not about the "extra work".  It is about the HOURS of classroom instructional time that is being lost to these tests and the additional stress of teachers and students involved.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@class80olddog 


"And then they give grades that are inflated or do not accurately reflect the mastery of the material."


SOME give grades that do not accurately reflect the mastery of the material, true. 


The question is why?



 1. Some teachers just do not want the hassle of failing a student: i.e the paperwork and data collection required, not to mention the backlash from parents.


2.  Some teachers know that the demands made of some students are above their ability (those with very low IQs) and know those students cannot meet certain standards.  Since they cannot get remedial help for those students, and they know retaining them will not necessarily help them either, they just pass them on. (These are the bubble kids who fall just above the Special Ed cut-off... too high for services, but too low to really make it in a traditional classroom moving the rate of their peers.  They need differentiated instruction, but many systems do not have the resources to offer them help.)


3.  Some teachers are under a lot of pressure from administration to "pass" students.  This happens when reformers tie things like "graduation rates" and "failure rates" to additional money, school "grades" and funding. Thus administration "demand" certain performance levels regardless of student ability because school administrators are under scrutiny from the BOE who in turn are being pressured by politicians and "reformers".  


4.  Some administrators lack the backbone to stand up to vocal parents,so they capitulate and put pressure on their teachers to inflate grades.


5. There are district policies that do not allow teachers to give "failing" grades.  This is built in grade inflation that teachers have no control over but which should alarm the public.


6.  There are too many "accountability" rules that are designed to "punish" schools for too many failures rather than providing them with the support teachers need to remediate failing students, 


7.  The desire to "assist" students by making them eligible for the HOPE...


Etc.



It is not simply a "teacher issues" and yes, it is insidious, but honestly, no one wants to deal with it when it might affect THEIR child or require MORE tax money.  (Retention costs money, folks.  Remedial classes cost money, folks.)

taylor48
taylor48

@Lindsaii78 Last year, the second grade students that I taught were given 5 SLO's (two from me, plus gym, music, and art).  That's five mornings of instruction lost.  Then, they were given the CogAT's.  There's three more mornings.  Then, in October, they were given the ITBS (five more mornings) and the end of first quarter benchmark tests in ELA and Math (two mornings).  That means, in the first nine weeks of school, we lost approximately 15 mornings of instructional time lost.  That's when my literacy block happens.  Now, I could have rearranged my schedule to ensure literacy was taught, but then I'd have to give up my math time (they still have to go to specials and lunch).  It's really hard to teach when the students are spending so much time testing.  In addition, because they've been required to sit for so long, they really need to be up and moving around.  They are only 7.


Just to let you know, it's actually NO extra work for me to give a standardized test, since I hand them pencils, the test booklets, and start reading the questions.  Easy planning and no grading.  If teachers wanted the easy way out, then they'd be all in favor of as many standardized tests as we could shove in front of kids.  But, you have to understand that we are TEACHERS, not professional test givers.  The meaning of teacher is "someone who teaches".  I'd love more time to do that and less time testing, even if it means more work planning for me.  So, not as lazy as you might think.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@Quidocetdiscit @class80olddog  I agree with what you say and I did not address the CAUSES behind non-representative grading.  As for your last point - yes, these programs cost money, but schools don't need any more, they just need to allocate the money give to the proper priorities. (4 times spending in sixties)


It is all tied together!  When a student is in a room with a bully that has not been disciplined, then the student lays out of school, falls behind, then gets socially promoted to the next class, where he is hopelessly lost - it is a never-ending cycle!  The student's poor attendance makes for a bad grade, then parents complain, then administrators buckle, then teachers up the grades, then the legislature requires tests to measure the real progress, so teachers have less time to teach - see how the cycle goes?

class80olddog
class80olddog

@taylor48 @Lindsaii78  You detail all the different tests given - WHY do we do all these tests?  Are they ALL required tests?  Why not use the ITBS for all of our testing needs?  One test at the beginning and one at the end (since you can't trust last year's test).

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Quidocetdiscit @class80olddog 

"(These are the bubble kids who fall just above the Special Ed cut-off... too high for services, but too low to really make it in a traditional classroom moving the rate of their peers.  They need differentiated instruction, but many systems do not have the resources to offer them help.)"

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

In my day in the 1970s - 2006, these were called the grey area students.  This situation has always existed and always will.  We must finally come to terms with the fact that we must address the needs of these future citizens in public schools, which as Quido has correctly stated costs money.

Likewise, we must pay more in order to have mental health services provided for citizens of the nation in extended stay facilities.  Our prisons are too crowded by not addressing adequately these two very important societal problems. Too many people with mental health difficulties are on the streets and are getting no help in today's America.  We can do better.  What affects one, affects all.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@class80olddog @Quidocetdiscit @Lindsaii78 As long as teachers are required to "make" students successful (instead of expecting students to work toward master) and give make ups, and study guides, and retakes, and no homework requirements, and no zeroes, we ill continue this downward spiral.  Education needs to be a multi-person effort.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

It just makes you question is there ANY coherent plan

Coming out of Atlanta?

lakesidedekalb
lakesidedekalb


In Dekalb County Schools, the SLOs consist of 20 to 30 questions created by a committee of teacher-volunteers paid about $30 per hour with RT3 funds. 


What is a SLO? A SLO is a 30-question quiz, given during the first 30 days of class and given again in the last 30 days of class, to objectively measure student progress on 160-180 days of instruction. The percentage of numerical progress between the first and the last 30 days of class effectively brands the teacher as great, good, mediocre, or bad. Get off the floor and read some more.


In Dekalb County Schools, the qualifications of the teachers for creating these SLOs was entirely subjective. The quality of these SLO's is objectively horrible. ( The AJC should acquire these SLO's and take a gander just for laughs at the Mouse that Roared supervised by Dekalb Curriculum and Instruction!)  


Now comes Matt Cardoza (Where in Heavens do they find these people?) to tell us we still can evaluate Dekalb teachers' livelyhood on the basis of these suspect instruments? 


Seriously, think for a moment, how can we evaluate teachers without first evaluating the band of brigands that run Dekalb's Curriculum and Instruction and principals like the faker-in-chief at Lakeside. 


I am curious to learn how the other school systems created and administered their SLOs.


lakesidedekalb
lakesidedekalb

I'd like to know how many teachers who wrote the SLO's and gave same SLO's to their own students received merit pay. This is not a conflict of interest, I guess.


I also want to know how many teachers earned merit pay without the opportunity of classroom visit. That is money from the tree of favoritism, I guess. 


I wonder what Judge Jerry Baxter from the Atlanta cheating scandal fame, would say, 

ILoveToWrite81
ILoveToWrite81

@lakesidedekalb In Matt's defense, he's a communications director. He does not have a degree in education, nor is he certified to teach. He is, however, great at working well with the media and answering questions based on information he gathers from the GaDOE officials.

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@Astropig @MaureenDowney @Lindsaii78 @lakesidedekalb 


DOE's obligation is to the public, first and foremost. All statements issued should be written so every Georgian can understand what is happening with their tax dollars. DOE puts the same releases on its website as it sends to the press. 

Taxpayers lose out if they excuse their leaders for failing to provide transparency, full information and access for any reason, least of all the standard "the media isn't fair" ruse.

By the way, I now have about 50 former colleagues around the country in public information jobs at every level of government, including the governor's office and the U.S. Senate. And many of them will confess to often falling back on that allegation whenever their bosses take a hit in the press, even when they agree -- off the record -- that the criticism is deserved. It's part of the job. And it's part of the media-politician dance. 

Any doubts, take a look at the new book by Mark Sanford's former PR guy.

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@Astropig @MaureenDowney @Lindsaii78 @lakesidedekalb The AJC has had an incredible five-year run of investigations that reflected shoe leather and digging.

That, however, does not remove the legal obligation of state agencies to disclose and inform.

I am not sure why anyone would not want a state agency to be candid and complete in its release of information. I get your contrarian role here on the blog, but even when it goes against the best interest of the public? 

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@Lindsaii78 @lakesidedekalb Matt is great in that he responds and tries to get DOE to respond. I have noted a distinct change in the information and detail in DOE statements of late. (There is also the lack of statements on some very big issues in the Legislature.)

I suspect that reflects the changing of the guard. There seems to be a "less said, the better" approach now. The problem with that is that it just puts work on Matt to address the unaddressed issues when the press calls.

I also believe public agencies using public funds should err on the side of too much information and detail. Tell people everything and let them decide what is important. 


Astropig
Astropig

@MaureenDowney @Astropig @Lindsaii78 @lakesidedekalb


Couldn't agree more. The paper has revealed lots of malfeasance in APS,which has nothing to do with the department you're mad at.I don't remember any big scandals in the state department of education.


Nice try to confuse or conflate the two,but there's no there there.

Teacher0324
Teacher0324

@lakesidedekalb  The SLOs for second grade consisted of only 10 questions, though we did have to administer for all subjects. This included the Art, P.E., and Music teachers.