‘I want to drop out of college with debt and no degree so I can move into my parents’ basement’

In the student accountability debate, most parents are unaware the test is only part of the equation. An important decision is what score on the test is deemed passing. This is called the cut score and where and how it is set is under review in several states where students are posting lower scores as a result of tougher standards.

One of those states is Florida. The Collaborative for Student Success is wading into Florida’s cut score debate with this well-done TV ad. In its statement on the new ad, the Collaborative said:

Earlier this year, the Collaborative launched The Honesty Gap campaign nationally. The initiative exposed the sometimes glaring rift between real student achievement rates as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, broadly considered the Gold Standard of student proficiency measures, and student achievement rates reported by the states.

For the 2013-14 school year, Florida showed a 22-point discrepancy between state reported proficiency scores and NAEP in fourth-grade reading, and a 16-point discrepancy in eighth-grade math.

Of course, Georgia has a heck of an honesty gap if NAEP is the standard: For the 2013-14 school year, Georgia had a 60-point disparity between our state proficiency scores and NAEP in fourth-grade reading, and a 53-point discrepancy in eighth-grade math.

Here is the ad targeting Florida:

Reader Comments 0

20 comments
Teacher24/7
Teacher24/7

Yes, especially here in Georgia where we created our own assessments. If we are using common core standards to provide a point of comparison with other states (accountability), then why choose an assessment that no one else uses?

I know that money was a huge issue in this decision, but how is this rational? We can't compare our scores to the PARCC scores of other states. Yes, we will have an internal standard of proficiency that we can use for state purposes, but it just perpetuates the problems listed in the article.

class80olddog
class80olddog

I posted a comment a couple of blogs back that the way the State (or individual schools) increases graduation rates is to set the bar lower and lower till they get the numbers they want.  Sort of like requiring every PE student to do a high jump, but literally setting the bar at one foot off of the ground.

class80olddog
class80olddog

The other "elephant in the room" is the fact that a lot of businesses now require a college degree for work that used to only require a HS diploma.  Have the business requirements changed?  No, but HS diplomas don't count for much anymore - especially after they did away with the GHSGT and gave 8000 students diplomas that failed that test (repeatedly).

gapeach101
gapeach101

I have spent a number of years wondering about all these high school students who go off to college as pre- med majors. It's clear to me they don't have the intelligence to get through med school. Many of them didn't get great numbers on the SAT, but that's just because they are bad test takers. Most struggle with general chemistry when they go off to college.

I guess when you've taken these tests all your school years and been told you exceed expectations, you think you do. It's all starting to make sense to me.

redweather
redweather

@gapeach101 I was always a bad test taker when I hadn't studied or paid attention in class.  Always thought those things were related.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@gapeach101 I presume your statement about being a "bad test taker" is tongue in cheek.  Otherwise, I agree with redweather.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@redweather @gapeach101 NO! - REALLY!  I thought ALL the problem with testing was that some students were poor test takers.  There are NO students who are just BAD STUDENTS - act up in class, are out of school a lot, or have been socially promoted to several grades above where they really are.  This DOES NOT HAPPEN!

BKendall
BKendall

States are not the only educational authority with questionable expectations. My short list includes NAEP, ACT, and SAT.

 I did not post the link to the first article, because "I benefit" from each individual reading it. However, if Maureen or the powers that be allow it. I will post.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

Unfortunately, it is hard to tell if the cut scores are set randomly or politically.  In Georgia, it is hard to see that there is ANY real justification for where they have been set.  So are the parties involved a) stupid, b) willfully ignorant, or c) pulling a fast one?

redweather
redweather

@Wascatlady Since education has become so PC these days, I think your options should be a) confused, b) not sure, or c) good dancers.

gapeach101
gapeach101

I agree with Bear. My answer to wascatlady is: Yes

AlreadySheared
AlreadySheared

@Wascatlady
"Welcome to Lake Wobegon, where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." - Garrison Keillor 

redweather
redweather

@Niobe Most all of the governors in the deep south are Republicans. And the states in the deep south typically don't lead the nation in educational attainment. Can you maybe provide some states with Democratic governors who have set the cut scores as low? Please do. Fair and balanced and all that.

Astropig
Astropig

@Niobe


Good catch. Again, the media thinks that the internet and Google and other forms of fact checking were never invented.