Should Georgia lower GPA required to keep HOPE for GaTech students?

Has the HOPE Scholarship — or rather the fear of losing the generous merit-based aid  — reduced the number of Georgia students willing to pursue challenging science and math degrees?

That’s the suggestion of a new study by researchers at Georgia and Oklahoma State Universities. The study of merit-based scholarship programs in several states including Georgia found: State merit-based scholarships reduce the likelihood a student will earn a degree in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) field.

“We find that as a result of these merit aid programs, there was a significant drop in the probability of students majoring in STEM,” said David L. Sjoquist, co-author of the study, professor of economics and affiliated faculty in the Center for State and Local Finance and the Fiscal Research Center in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State.

Do we need more engineers? (Georgia Tech Photo)

Is HOPE pushing students out of tougher science and math programs? (Georgia Tech Photo)

HOPE pays a large portion of tuition at Georgia’s public campuses for high school students who quality. To keep HOPE, students need to maintain a 3.0 average in college. To hold onto the more lucrative Zell Miller Scholarship, students must maintain a 3.30 GPA in college.

I have wondered whether Georgia ought to use the HOPE Scholarship more strategically to increase the number of STEM graduates. Now, tech and science companies import STEM workers or sometimes bypass Georgia because of the shallow pool.

Given Georgia’s need to encourage more students to enter the tech, math and science fields, should we re-calibrate HOPE based on a student’s major?

Should we penalize an engineering major at Georgia Tech or a biochemistry major at the University of Georgia for slipping to a 2.9 in demanding courses?

Last year, I asked the chancellor of Georgia’s colleges and universities this question: Given the rigor of Georgia Tech courses and the state’s increasing need for math and science talent, should Tech be treated as a special case and the GPA threshold to retain HOPE Scholarships lowered?

Chancellor Hank Huckaby told me, “I don’t know how you deal with that but I understand the argument can be made. I don’t have an answer but it keeps coming up. And that argument is getting louder. It, quite frankly, is something we haven’t addressed yet.”

This new study may raise the volume of that argument:

From GSU this morning:

State merit-based scholarships reduce the likelihood a student will earn a degree in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) field, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Oklahoma State University.

Their study, published in the Journal of Labor Economics in October, examined the effect of state merit-based financial aid programs, such as Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship, on students’ choice of major.

The results suggest that adopting a strong merit aid program reduces a state’s number of STEM graduates by 6.5 percent, and possibly by as much as 9.1 percent. In addition, the decrease in the likelihood of earning a STEM degree as a result of a strong merit aid program was more dramatic for male students than for female students.

Further analysis is needed to explain why merit aid affects the choice of college major.

If the effect is a result of students’ concern with earning the grade-point average (GPA) necessary to maintain scholarship eligibility, one policy solution would be to lower the GPA requirement for STEM majors.

If high school students avoid courses that would prepare them for STEM majors to maintain eligibility for merit aid, basing their eligibility on SAT or ACT scores could reduce that problem, Sjoquist said.

The researchers considered 27 states that adopted merit-based aid programs between 1991 and 2005, but focused on strong programs in nine states: Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia. These nine programs are considered strong because of their eligibility criteria, the number of students in the program and the size of the award.

The researchers compared enrollment data of students majoring in STEM subjects before and after merit aid scholarships were adopted in these states. They also made comparisons to states with no merit aid programs and considered the effect of merit aid on non-STEM majors.

Since 1991, more than two dozen American states have adopted merit-based student financial aid programs, which award scholarships to in-state students who meet merit requirements based on high school GPA and sometimes SAT or ACT scores or class rank.

The programs also require students to maintain a certain college GPA to renew the reward. GPA requirements and award values can vary. A goal for these programs is to improve the quality of the state’s workforce by increasing the number of college-educated workers in the state.

Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship, adopted in 1993, is among the largest and most notable of the state merit-based financial aid programs in the country.

In another recent study published in the IZA Journal of Labor Economics, the researchers examined student administrative records from the University System of Georgia to determine whether Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship has affected students’ college major decisions.

They found Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship reduced the likelihood of a student earning a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field. There was a 12.6 percent decrease in the number of STEM graduates, with the effects being greater for males. The decline in STEM majors is primarily the result of initial STEM majors switching to another major, according to the study.

Few studies have explored the effect of merit aid on the choice of college major, which has a significant impact on a student’s post-college earnings. Many officials are concerned the United States is not producing enough majors in STEM fields, which are major drivers of innovation and economic growth. Only one-fifth of all college graduates major in a STEM field.

John V. Winters of the Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State collaborated on both studies.

To read the first study, “State Merit Aid Programs and College Major: A Focus on STEM,” which examined the effect of state merit aid programs across the United States, go here.

To review the second study, “The Effect of Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship on College Major: A Focus on STEM,” go here.

Reader Comments 0

66 comments
iwd
iwd

It seems that a substantial portion of this discussion (including many comments) seems to presume that a large portion of GT STEM grades stay in the state of Georgia. Is there evidence to support this? GT grads are in high demand across the country and throughout the world; I assume a very large portion leave the state after graduation. It may be that having a local supply of STEM grads creates a conducive environment for tech-based firms, but a marginal (and the findings are somewhat marginal) decline due to the HOPE requirements seems unlikely to change that environment that much. And, adjusting the standards downwards for certain majors will only help those folks who can make those thresholds (some are likely to still not meet the lower thresholds).


In a better world, we would just drop HOPE and switch to merit-and-need based aid (or better yet, invest the dollars in pre-K through 12). HOPE is amazingly regressive. If I recall correctly, Dr. Sjoquist has done other research that shows the program results in students getting cars (from their parents who bribe them to stay in state with a new car...).

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

Something else to consider.  If the lower GPA requirement to keep HOPE is a good idea for Georgia Tech, what about the Medical College of Georgia, now one of the colleges of Ga. Regents U.? That is just as prominent in the field of medicine as GT is in engineering...just as hard to get top grades there, too.

An American Patriot
An American Patriot

The White House has set the bar for lowering expectations so, WHY NOT??


Ah, so what that a building is a degree or two or three out of square.  WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE?????



AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

Is it not all relative? 


Some kids are smart enough to maintain HOPE at GA Tech and some are not. 

Some kids are not smart enough to get in GA Tech at all. All kids have to choose college programs according to their abilities and balance that with possibilities of maintaining HOPE.


You are not special or a more deserving person because you can access a "STEM" program. 


If businesses need more stem grads, they can pay enough to make up for lack of hope: otherwise, the need for stem majors is not really that great of a need.



AlreadySheared
AlreadySheared

@AvgGeorgian  "All kids have to choose college programs according to their abilities and balance that with possibilities of maintaining HOPE."


Well, yeah, I guess so. I have a son at Tech now, and as an alum (I "got out" with a GPA of less than 3.0), it has been clear to me all along that his losing Zell and even Hope is a distinct possibility.


We are prepared for this, and while the scholarship $$$s definitely help, our plan is to muddle through somehow even if he loses his scholarship to lower grades - we think the opportunities he will get at Tech are worth the possible additional cost vs. attending somewhere else where he would be more likely to keep his scholarship.


I think, however, that it would be a shame for a talented student from a lower income family to have to make the tradeoff you suggest.  We live in a time where economic competition is world-wide.  As a society, we are ill-served by forcing, for financial reasons, some of our best and brightest into colleges that do not maximize their potential.


p.s. NO, I do NOT favor making Zell/Hope need-based. I love that we have a broad-based merit scholarship program here in Georgia.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

I would be in favor of changing the requirements for well-regarded STEM programs at any Georgia college.  In fact, I would even increase the amount of HOPE available to those who have good grades who are in bona fide STEM programs, perhaps beginning after 60 credit hours.  THAT might steer more able students into STEM programs.  Perhaps even extend it to top master's degree students in certain underserved STEM fields.

MoFaux
MoFaux

I graduated from GT right after HOPE started, so unfortunately, I had ZERO chance to raise my 2.6 high enough to get it.  HOPE certainly provides a much greater incentive to work towards a 3.0.  Folks, this school is difficult, even for very smart people.  Anyone who says otherwise is either one of those people who always performs well on tests, has a photographic memory, is a true genius, is someone who has no social life and studies for hours on end every day, is a liar, or some combination of the above.  I admit that I could have definitely worked harder than I did, and would have if I'd been able to foretell the future and knew HOPE was coming...but still, there is a definite truth to the fact that holding a standard GPA requirement for every student in GA is not fair to those in more difficult majors and should be lowered.  Luckily for me, tuition was super cheap back then and my total student loan was less than $12,000.  

User777
User777

One thing that should really be discussed in promoting STEM majors is the hour cap.  Right now, there is a hard hour cap of 127 hours.  Most undergrads require 120 hours.  So, there's some wiggle room if you change majors, etc...  Engineering requires more - 132 hours.  There used to be wording in Hope that allowed a student with a 3.0 min. to keep Hope to cover any hours above 127 if their degree required it.  That was removed in 2007.  If we want to encourage STEM, this seems like a common sense fix.

Carlos_Castillo
Carlos_Castillo

If we want to drive up the number of STEM grads, first change the purpose of the program, then change the numbers.

AlreadySheared
AlreadySheared

1) The top 10% of students in a first year calculus or chemistry class at Georgia Southern or GPC are probably getting A's.


2) Every student in a Georgia Tech calculus or chemistry class would likely be in the top 10% of a class at Georgia Southern or GPC.


3) Below is a link to the Georgia Tech "Course Critique" which shows the grade distribution for a first year calculus class:  the average GPA overall is 2.4.


https://critique.gatech.edu/course.php?id=MATH1501


I think it would be appropriate to lower Tech's Zell threshold to 3.0, and HOPE to 2.7.  I honestly believe that 90% of the students who are attending Tech would keep their scholarships if they had chosen to attend other Georgia colleges.

commonsense76
commonsense76

I have always thought the HOPE requirement for Tech students was not fair, perhaps because I was a victim :-)  I entered Tech in the fall of 1994, with the HOPE scholarship.  My major was undecided engineering.  Freshman year is core classes, and suddenly being in an auditorium of students versus a classroom of 30 and more individualized attention, was a shock to the system.  My Calc II teacher was German with a heavy accent, and he would teach facing the board.  I'm serious!  So not only was he difficult to understand with his accent, but you could barely hear him because he wouldn't turn around!  Needless to say, those core classes and some poor teachers killed me, and I lost HOPE after my freshman year.  I changed my major to Management just so I wouldn't have to take Chem I and Chem II again.  And that was that. 

Old Dude 828
Old Dude 828

My son is a Mechatronics Engineering major at KSU(SPSU).  I do agree that it's not fair that all majors are treated equally under HOPE.  My son had HOPE for the first two years, then lost it when his overall GPA slipped to a 2.99 (he actually hit more of a bump with his non-STEM "core" classes which he hates because he's a math/science kid).  


When I look at the level of difficulty of his classes versus most other majors it's a joke that the same rules apply across the board.  Not only is that ridiculous, when he quickly pulled his GPA back up to a 3.3 (by making straight A's his last semester) HOPE says "too bad, you lost it now you have to wait a whole year to get it back".  WTH??  I am an Electrical Engineer w/ undergrad from UF and graduate school at NCSU.  I know there's the whole "GATech is harder than every other school", but I can honestly say my son's curriculum at KSU/SPSU is every bit as hard (if not harder) than my own experience at UF and NCSU.  Calculus is Calculus, DiffE is DiffE, and Partial DiffE is Partial DiffE.  He's taken all three plus Linear Algebra, C++, Digital Design, Fluid Mechanics, etc.  Just a few examples of the nasty, hard courses he's taking that are at least the equal to and in some cases much over and above what I had.


So when we say we need to account for the difficulty and rigor of STEM majors in GA as far as HOPE is concerned, I hope it doesn't become just a GATech exception.  There are other schools in GA with STEM majors that are extremely rigorous and difficult as well.

anothercomment
anothercomment

Look at the fine print of the Mechatronics degree, your kid might not have Engineering standing and actually be in the Engineering School at KSU ( barf) Southern Tech. Now that they have changed the entrance criteria to KSU's they are requiring that all Engineering, Science and Math classes must have a 2.7 GPA in those specific classes of that degree program to have Engineering Standing after 2 years going into 3 rd year.

i am an engineer who has a multi-disciplinary Masters degree. If your son is not good with the non Math and Science and lacks interpersonal skills than his Mechatronics degree is the wrong fit for him. While it may sound cool as billed as drones and robots. If you look further it is really suppose to be an interdisciplinary electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, computer science and project management degree. Which might just be why most universities are not doing what Southern Tech ( oops KSU in need of students to support Football team ) and offering at undergraduate program, most only offer this degree at MS level. Your kid does not sound like he is a good fit for this degree if he can not get A's in the easy classes. How will he be a project manager or supervisor if he can not handle the interdisciplinary courses?

My friends son with asbergers is being pitched this program. I am having to explain it is the wrong fit! mAy sound cool, but most engineers are not interdisplin People nor management oriented. If you look further this program is not even graduating 15- p% of the starting classes. Then Dr. Kevin McFalls won' 't return my calls. The contact ladies can't answer an engineering question if pressed.

Starik
Starik

Every institution, every neighborhood, every group you can think of has a culture that defines it.  At GT, the Engineering faculty has always been brutal in issuing grades.  They see themselves as gatekeepers for the school and the profession. 

panthergir88
panthergir88

My son is in his second year as a chemical engineering major at GT. He told me that engineering majors who can't keep the hope scholarship change their majors to business. I would think that it would be in the best interest of the state of Georgia for those students to remain in engineering.

My son spent his freshman year at tech working harder than he has ever worked in his life. He ended up with 1 A and 7 Bs. He was a 33 ACT, 4.3 GPA kid - the classes are that hard. He lost his zell Miller and now just has hope. I understand that hope is free money and I'll take what we get. But what is the point of taking scholarship money away from a kid who is taking really difficult classes and working his butt off? Do we really want him to leave chemical engineering and become another business major? I would think it would be in the best interest of the state of Georgia for him to remain in chemical engineering.

User777
User777

If your son really wants to be a chemical engineer, it's in his best interests to stick it out. Believe me, I know. I survived engineering school, and mentored a daughter who graduated from GT with an ISyE degree last year. It is hard. But if it's what he really wants, it is so worth it.

jerryeads
jerryeads

An A is not an A is not an A is not an A. On the other hand, an A is not necessarily the most important thing. I run my kids ragged, and maybe I could run them raggeder at one of the 'big two' - but ten years from now I'll put mine up against the kids whose parents use HOPE for the Benz payment any day of the week.

popcornular - didn't even take calculus. Didn't need it for a stat Ph.D.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

Again, for the umpteenth time, make HOPE a Reimbursement Program where the student pays his tuition and then gets reimbursed upon successful completion of the class.  You could also make it a progressive reimbursement where they would get 80% for a C, 90% for a B, and 100% for an A.  It would eliminate many of the issues with HOPE and would prevent payment gymnastics such as this discussion thread.

grumpster
grumpster

So, under your scenario , a C in 3 dimensional calculus gets reimbursed at 80% while an A in Art History gets reimbursed at 100%.

Tell me again how this encourages STEM majors

RetiredSuper
RetiredSuper

Consider changing HOPE to a reimbursement grant tied to the specific degree (basic supply vs demand). STEM degrees would be reimbursed at a higher percentage than a basket weaving degree, for example. A student posting a 3.5-4.0 in a STEM couse semester would receive 100% tution/books/etc reimbursement HOPE, A student posting 3.0-3.4 could apply for 80% (example) Hope reimbursement grant. Maybe an engineering student posting a 2.90 would receive 70% ....etc. This way a student would have something invested before they received funding.


popcornular
popcornular

I think every educator on this blog should be required to reveal their grade in Calculus. 

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

What about letting the market work? 


If GA Tech needs more students, they can reduce the rigor. 


If students want the HOPE and can't keep the grades for GA Tech, go somewhere else.


If companies need more STEM workers, they can pay more money.

altantamom
altantamom

@AvgGeorgian

Really?  You want that student who was admitted to Tech under a "Reduce Rigor" program designing and building your bridges?

anothercomment
anothercomment

This sums up your name average Georgian, Along with the Conservative Republican motto keep them dumb and ignorant !!!

dcdcdc
dcdcdc

Absolutely can't happen.  After all, in the eyes of a large portion of the electorate, these kids were "lucky" - not hard working.  


Why should they get anything?  Much better to punish hard workers, and reward those who don't push themselves.


The country does so much better that way.

User777
User777

This comes up every year, and I don't think it will ever really be addressed.  I have told my own kids, if you want to go into Engineering, do not discount it because the GPA is harder to come by.  A GT graduate with a 3.0 (or 2.9) will be rewarded in the long run.  For me, engineering has been an incredible career.  I have had experiences I could never have imagined when I was 18.  If it is what you want to do, work hard, and don't stress about an occasional C.  Perseverance is so much more important.  Hope should cover all 132 hours though.  That is just common sense.

Mewslim
Mewslim

Students who will EARN degrees in STEM already have the GPA for hope.


OriginalProf
OriginalProf

I really think, to speak honestly on both subjects (lower GPA required for GT and for STEM majors), that both would be impossible to get passed for purely political reasons...and I don't mean Republican and Democratic! How is the Chancellor going to persuade the other research universities that one of them is so much more difficult that it deserves a special category for its HOPE recipients?  And  how are the Presidents of those universities going to persuade their Deans that some colleges are inherently more rigorous than the others?  Especially when having lower GPA requirements for the HOPE recipients would most likely guarantee higher enrollments?


Chancellor Huckaby is going to keep waffling on this issue, I am sure.

borivera1957
borivera1957

My daughter is at Tech right now, and she works hard to keep her Zell Miller. I believe something does need to be done and I think it should be based not just on the school but the curriculum. A student going for a Medical, or engineering degree should get break on the GPA requirement.. The other thing not mentioned about GA Tech is that to graduate from most engineering programs you need 132 credits and HOPE only pays for 120, that also needs to be looked at. 

User777
User777

@borivera1957  Totally agree on covering the extra hours for an engineering degree.  That was removed (2007?), but it unfairly penalizes students whose degree requires greater than 120.  It also forces students to take larger loads per semester than they really should, which can really end up hurting their GPA.

Susan89
Susan89

No.  Unless they do it for ALL of the students in the State of Georgia.  Not just for those students.

Mewslim
Mewslim

@Susan89


We do not need more Marketing or Liberal Arts graduates.

DawgnIT
DawgnIT

We also have to remember that entering a STEM field is a choice.  Yeah, it might be more difficult than most other majors but it's the path chosen.  Also, as simple as the notion sounds to weigh the difficulty of classes, majors, and/or schools, to actually implement it and manage such a system would be a costly pain.  I mean everything else is in education.


Perhaps we need more employers investing in high school students instead of depending on current adult employees taking advantage of tuition reimbursement to grow into needed roles.  I know in IT, there are so many unfilled jobs available all over the country because even with workers here on VISA, there's just not enough qualified people for all the needs out there.  


There's a lot of STEM programs popping up around the country for middle and high school students, and that's a good start.  However, I think businesses need to invest in these students and offer to supplement the cost of higher education in return for employment.  Even if you have to begin with current college students and expand upon internship and co-op opportunities, a stable connection between education and industry is needed with clear pathways to employment.  Many internship programs exist for the sake of having one and to get cheap temp work out of these students who would love to go full-time after graduation.  Some companies are a lot better than others about extending offers of employment to former interns upon graduation.


Existing workers should be using tuition reimbursement as a means to filling higher level jobs freeing up lower level jobs for new grads.  Instead, I think we're seeing a lot of adult career changers taking advantage of tuition reimbursement compared to those growing in their current career path.


I think a lot of middle and high school kids would feel more confident and motivated about STEM fields if they saw a smooth path to employment with the cost of education along the way being minimized without too much stress.  When the rubber meets the road, many students who enter college as a STEM major change to something else if they feel discouraged about the amount of effort required to maintain HOPE and having to seek employment after graduation.  "Easier" majors and career paths start looking mighty nice when you're fighting for an A or B in a difficult STEM related course.  Then they end up in the Catch-22 of graduating with a degree where it's more difficult to find a job while the STEM jobs remain unfilled since many students leave those majors to maintain HOPE.


Quite frankly, cost of education shouldn't be a prohibiting factor in matching a young person with the desire to work with an employer with a position needing to be filled.  Investment and return on investment are still important in our economy and I believe business needs to invest more in human resources.

altantamom
altantamom

To graduate summa cum laude at UGA you need a GPA of 3.9.

To graduate with highest honors at GT you need a GPA of 3.55.

Clearly high  GPAs are harder to achieve at GT than UGA.

I like grumpster's idea of getting bonus points for upper level STEM classes (for HOPE purposes only). 

Even GT has humanities majors these days. Those classes have an average GPA of at least 1 point higher than engineering classes. 

grumpster
grumpster

@altantamom 

I've looked, as I hope to go back to GT to finish my degree. 

A psychology major still has to have calc I, calc II (with linear algebra) and calc III.

RealLurker
RealLurker

I went to GT and have many friends that went to other colleges in GA.  I do believe that Tech is much tougher academically than many of the other schools.  


Do you multiply the GPA by 1.1 at Tech?  Do you multiply by 1.2?  Do you multiply by 0.8 at a different college with a basket weaving type major?  I would agree that it is more difficult to maintain a 3.3 GPA in an engineering major at Tech than many majors in other schools.  However there is not objective way to assess the difference in difficulty.


If there is a need to push more people into STEM, teaching, or any other field, it would be a better tactic to restrict the majors that HOPE funds can be used for than to put arbitrary modifications to an arbitrary cutoff score.

grumpster
grumpster

As a current college student who doesn't go to Tech  - y'all have all heard the old student story - I can assure you that calculus is calculus, regardless of school.  Calculus I & II have put a major hit on my GPA.  I expect Chemistry I & II to do the same next year.

The kids in my classes bust their collective butts to keep a decent GPA.  I looked around my Calculus III class the other night.  I counted six out of thirty whose first language is American English.  What does that tell you about who the current STEM majors are?  Part of that is the courses are self-selecting.  You have to be willing to do the work.  I'm reasonably sure another part is the HOPE scholarship. 

It's just too easy to make a C in calculus.

I'd like to see some sort of weighting/curve for STEM classes.  I mean the real deal courses such as calculus based physics, not just any math or science course.  Maybe a 2.0 in Linear Algebra gets counted as a 3.0 for HOPE.

RichardKPE
RichardKPE

@grumpster What you might be missing is that Calculus 1 and 2 at your school might be crammed into a single semester at Tech (depends on your school of course).  


My sister (at UF) took probability one semester and statistics the next semester.  At Tech, that was one class.


(Football players on the other hand....)

altantamom
altantamom

@grumpster

My daughter took Calc  I and II at GSU as a senior in HS.  When she went to GT they said fine, but she also had to take a linear algebra class, which apparently GT includes in Calc I or Calc II.

grumpster
grumpster

@RichardKPE @grumpster 

All you need to do is look at GT Oscar for the transfer equivalencies.  Calc I and Calc III transfer as is from GPC to GT.  Calc II, as @altantamom points out, requires a Linear Algebra.  That is a separate class.

grumpster
grumpster

@altantamom @grumpster 

Linear algebra is currently a part of the GT Calc II class.  I talked to someone in the math department when planning my schedule.  She said "For now, it is part of calc II."  So I took Linear Algebra immediately after I took Calc II. Now I'm on to calc III.

I know some GT students with 3.5-ish GPAs who took the same calc II class I did - from the same professor.  We all agree it's the toughest class we ever had.  It will weed them out, that's for sure.

grumpster
grumpster

@altantamom @grumpster 

I took Calc I, Calc II, and Linear Algebra. I'm working on Calc III now.

What is killing me is college algebra/ trig. Unfortunately, I took it in the 1960s and I don't remember it all. Oops :)

RationalThoughts67
RationalThoughts67

@grumpster You are wrong. I attended both UGA and GT and took Calculus at both schools.   The GT Calculus classes were much more difficult.  I have a physics  degree from UGA and an engineering degree from GT.

RationalThoughts67
RationalThoughts67

@grumpster And my Calculus grades?. As & Bs at UGA. I had to work my butt off to make Cs at GT.  Two years of Calculus.

living-in-outdated-ed
living-in-outdated-ed

3.3 seems awfully high.   I wouldn't go any lower than 2.75, but I think they need to do some research on this and not act rashly.

TicTacs
TicTacs

If the student is in good standing with the school and can graduate with a 2.0,  HOPE should pay. 

DawgnIT
DawgnIT

@Jefferson1776 @DawgnIT Nah but a 2.0 is doing the minimum to pass.  If someone is paying for your education, a student can at least do them the courtesy of trying to do more than the minimum.

PITTFAN
PITTFAN

@Jefferson1776 

Agree to that but for years they were paying for just about EVERYONE to go to school and look how many people squandered that opportunity and saw it as a time to party on someone elses dime.  If they don't raise the standards and make you actually work for the money, they will do the bare minimum to stay in school and graduate.