Another cop. Another teen. They didn’t tangle; they tangoed.

Maybe this is the better way to defuse potentially tense situations with teens. A female police officer in Washington, D.C., wanted teens to disperse after a fight Monday and ended up in a dance-off with one of the young women.

According to the Washington Post:  (This is a great story. Take time to go read it.)

On Monday afternoon, D.C. police officers broke up two groups of fighting teenagers. A few minutes later, a female officer approached the lingering crowd and told the teens to disperse.

That’s when Aaliyah Taylor, a 17-year-old senior at Ballou High School, walked up to the officer and started playing “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” on her phone. Then she did the Nae Nae dance. The officer, according to Taylor, laughed and said she had far better dance moves than that.

“Instead of us fighting, she tried to turn it around and make it something fun,” Taylor said. “I never expected cops to be that cool. There are some good cops.” Taylor said the officer told the group that if the teens won the dance-off, they could stay. If the officer won, they would have to leave.

And so the dance-off began. Both competitors declared themselves the winner and everyone went home happy.

 

Reader Comments 0

29 comments
newsphile
newsphile

I think it's great the office tangoed.  I don't like that the officer said if the kids won the contest they could stay.  I'm not in favor of brutality, but I am in favor of rules and people, including teens, obeying them.  No one is safe in a land where laws and rules mean nothing.

straker
straker

amazing - "is an orphan"


I don't think losing a mother and grandmother would prompt one to disrupt a classroom and refuse the lawful order of a police officer.


You're adding 1 + 1 and getting 11.

Amazing
Amazing

There is one fact all the experts here fail to consider. The disruptive child is an orphan who list her mother and grandmother within the last year. That is a lot for anyone to bear. It does justify nor excuse her behavior. It just provides more context than the convenient story line of a disruptive child whose parents didn't raise her right.

Likewise
Likewise

Should police officers be involved in basic disruptive behavior issues when public safety is not threatened?  Why are we pursuing a model for our schools that is more in line with the 1950s than for 2015?  At the high school level, if students don't want to be there, why are they? Why do we feel the need to compel students to be there to learn when they clearly don't want to be?  Will society eventually break through to that student and correct misguided behavior? Can we force people to learn and be productive in life?  Maybe that's part of the discussion.  Maybe we need to admit that in the status quo, for liberals it's an opportunity to focus only on the victims as an indictment of society run by the majority.  For conservatives, an opportunity to highlight the public school systems' worst failures. Eliminating the conflict is key. Making high school compulsory for those who simply don't want to be there will only result in a continuation of the status quo.     

redweather
redweather

@Likewise The value of having an educated society is not liberal issue. This country decided long ago that all children should have access to an education. It's mandatory because education benefits the individual child as well as our country. The other thing is that we would be doing our children a disservice if we allowed them to make this decision for themselves well before they have the knowledge and maturity to make such a decision.

straker
straker

Buckyee


I posted 22 minutes ago.


At that time, there was no "easy solution" posted.

Marlayna
Marlayna

Students have neither fear of consequences nor respect for adults/authority. This situation is happening is many schools and more with be seen due to social media and cell phone cameras. I really feel for eduactos, administrators and school board members.


Infraredguy
Infraredguy

Common sense works most all the time.

BCW1
BCW1

The reason schools have SRO's today is because of what is not being taught at home. If respect for authority is taught and respected at home, most of these issues don't take place. Most issues that schools deal with today reflect sorry parenting at home!!!!! But yet again, no parent accountability.

straker
straker

Road - "how should that have been handled"


Some have said the parents should have been called.


Other than that, its been all criticism and no solutions.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@straker Here is some solutions - first attempt to contact the foster parents (apparently it has come out that the girl had just recently lost her mother, then her grandmother, who knows about her father, so she was in foster care).

Then have the principal inform her that her first refusal to leave will get her 5 hours of ISS, then inform her that her next refusal to leave will earn her 5 days of OSS, then finally give her the ultimatum of if she does not comply with his demand, she will be expelled (and then of course carry out the threat).  Remove the rest of the class and the teacher to the library, turn off the lights and wait outside the door. 

It would be good if they could make that entire class make up that day of instruction by lengthening the school year for that class (yea, her friends would not be her friends so much after that).

None of that would actually happen, because the existing educational system is so dysfunctional.  The incident was the culmination of lots of little infractions that were never properly enforced (particularly cell phones).

Qiana Wise
Qiana Wise

@class80olddog  Excellent!! That's exactly how the situation should have been handled. It's a shame no one thought about that.

RoadScholar
RoadScholar

In the case where the kid was disrupting class and did not obey the teacher and the security cop, how should that have been handled? Let her disrupt the class more? Dragged out in her desk? Suspended until she and her parents agree to honor the rules and teachers? The cop was physical....but what was the "proper " solution??? Everyone has said/written how bad it was , but....no one has answered the hard questions.

TheDeal2
TheDeal2

@RoadScholar How was the student disrupting learning?  The teacher could have simply said, "Class, I am going to deal with XXX student after class.  This will be the last day she has a cellphone available to her while she is in my class, and if any of you ever refuse, the same thing will happen to you.  Now, onto Chapter 2 in your books."

Astropig
Astropig

@RoadScholar


Yours seems to be the salient question in the matter.Such is the absurdity of runaway emotions that our FBI is now investigating an incident that started because a student was texting in class.

CSpinks
CSpinks

Let's not limit body cameras to use by law enforcement officers. Rather, let's equip each public school teacher and administrator with a video camera with audio capabilities. My volunteer videoing in some of my area's public school classrooms certainly improved the behavior of the kids there.


Oh, I know. We don't have the money. Well, how 'bout the fat-cat school board attorneys' and educational consultants' reducing their exorbitant fees. Their so doing would free up hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars for such documentary devices.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@CSpinks I have to wonder about your "volunteer videoing" claim, since teachers are not allowed to video students misbehaving, even to show only at parent conferences.

class80olddog
class80olddog

Where is the story about the black kid who throws the white 62-year-old principal to the floor?  Oh, wait, that is not news...

BuckeyeGa
BuckeyeGa

@class80olddog I did see the news about a white cop shooting a black man named Walter Scott in the back..

BuckeyeGa
BuckeyeGa

Great job by the officer acting like an adult and good cop. Community policing seems to be extinct.   Now when something happens, the cop will be able to talk to the teens..also the teens will defend the cop.

BuckeyeGa
BuckeyeGa

The two danced for a few minutes face-to-face — stanky leg and all — and Taylor said the officer would have kept going, but she got tired. Both Taylor and the officer declared themselves the victors, hugged and everyone left the area.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@BuckeyeGa 

This may work when the police officer is female, but I doubt it would with a male officer.

meno
meno

It speaks poorly of our society, as a whole, when we so quickly assume that only the most violent responses are justified in dealing with such situations.  Hopefully, this cop can get some of us to see things differently.

redweather
redweather

Wonderful!  Nothing like using a little creativity to diffuse a situation. 

NealBoortz
NealBoortz

Great Story Maureen......seriously.  Most of these kids just Need to believe in themselves and know that someone cares.