A-F school grading will give Georgia parents useful measuring stick

Kelly Cadman lives in Douglasville and teaches at Brighten Academy Charter School. In this essay, she explains why she supports Georgia’s new A-F school grading system,

By Kelly Cadman

Politicians may talk a big game about education, but at the end of the day, no one has the same stake in my children’s future that I do. As a parent, I’m ultimately responsible for ensuring my two boys, aged 11 and 16, are prepared for all the opportunities and challenges that life brings. I am also a teacher, and I believe that responsibility extends to my students.

But how are we parents supposed to know what happens in our kids’ schools? We can’t do anything to help if we don’t know their schools are struggling. Even the most involved parents can miss major problems in the classroom, because we can’t be there every day. That is why I’m excited about the new A-F school grading system in Georgia.

report-card-150x150The new system, which was signed into law by Gov. Nathan Deal earlier this year and will be released in 2016, raises the bar in education in three critically important areas. Here is where the teacher in me kicks in.

First and foremost, A-F school grading prioritizes excellence over the complacency in the old system. There should be no greater goal in education than academic success. Through the simplicity of A-F letter grades, parents can quickly identify problematic trends at their children’s school and get engaged to help turn them around.

Secondly, according to other states that have implemented A-F school grading, this urgency prompts entire communities to come together to tackle the problems of a given school. Across the nation, parents, teachers and community leaders are rejecting mediocrity and the status quo, and dedicating themselves to improving student achievement.

Just like a report card helps me understand how my child is doing academically, A-F grades will give me a better idea of how their schools are performing. And the increase of public attention surrounding the release of the grades will inspire pride in successful schools and unleash a competitive fire in struggling schools committed to doing better.

While the new A-F school grading system provides more accountability and transparency in education, that does not mean it is perfect. And as parents, teachers and community leaders, we must continue to push to refine the system to improve student achievement.

The debate over education reform is never an easy one. Many of us parents sincerely love our children’s teachers and know that our schools are working harder than ever to provide our children with an education that prepares them for success. As a teacher, I am striving each day to set my students up for success. But this is a debate worth having, because how we educate our children today will determine not just their future, but the future of our entire state.

As a mother of two children and teacher to 27 students, I choose reform. And it is my belief that Georgia’s new A-F school grading policy will help create an education system that is second to none.

 

 

 

Reader Comments 0

61 comments
DekalbInsideOut
DekalbInsideOut

OCGA 20-14-104 says a rating of A, B, C, D, or F for each public elementary and secondary school in this state based on student achievement, achievement gap closure, and student growth.


Student growth compares the academic achievement of academically similar students from across the state.  So, 2 of the 3 measurements deal with the challenges low performing schools face.

elementary-pal
elementary-pal

As one who has to look at the indicators on the CCRPI on a regular basis, I have to admit that, in theory, it is a better measure for schools than what we have had in the past.  However, it is still heavily based on test scores.  There are extra points awarded to schools where students are taught world languages, but schools like mine, where we are teaching English to non-English speakers, do not qualify for those points.

My problem is that all schools are ranked using the same goals, even if the schools do not begin at the same starting line.  For example, the school system in the community where I live was recognized as being a Title I Reward School - meaning the scores of the students at this school were in the top percentages for all Title I schools.  Great for them, but this school has 52% poverty.   On the other hand, the school where I work is 97% poverty.    We do not start at the same point, but we are expected to be at the same finish line on the same time line. 

I keep reading about "failing schools."  I need a definition.  The teachers in my school are not failing; they are working many, many hours to provide the educational experience our students deserve.  The students in my school are not failing; they are learning a new language and the content that is contained in the standards.  Are they reaching the grade level goals? not all of them, but they are making great growth - much more growth than the students in the school recognized for great test scores.  If we were running the Peachtree Road Race, it would be like expecting those of us who are in the last group of runners - starting way back at Wieuca Road - to be competition for  those who were at the starting line when the race starts.  

 I could take the faculty of our school and put them to work in the school with the highest scores (read most affluent) in our district, and there would be little difference in the test scores of the students.  I predict there would  be an increase due to the teaching strategies these teachers implement.  At the same time, I could take the faculty of the high-rated school and move them to our school, and I predict test scores would fall, not because the new faculty is not good, but because a different style of teaching is required in a school like ours.    

So, to the posters who would call our school failing and condemn us for not wanting to be held accountable, we just want to be judged on what we can control, what we do each day, and the growth of our students based on where WE start our journey, and not where the top contenders start.  Our students are perfectly capable of reaching the finish line, but be reasonable about the time it will take to get there. 






gg74
gg74

"A rose by any other name..." I have been in Georgia for over 20 years and have yet to see our state education system ever ranked above 45th in the nation. Yet it seems all the State GADOE does is change the way we report how bad we are doing.  I cannot help but wonder if all of the money spent by the state on measuring and reporting was actually spent on teaching and learning, how much better we might actually be doing with our public schools. For now I will excuse local districts, because they are so legislated into how they run with only surface level autonomy. Our federal government just got out of the education business for the most part with the new rewrite of NCLB and basically told the states to figure it out themselves - which I think is a great thing. Bottom line though... stop measuring and let schools start doing.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

"It may mean that the old must go away to be replaced by new thinking."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 


Engraved on the statue of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, at his Memorial in Washington, D.C., are his words: "They (who) seek to establish systems of government based on the regimentation of all human beings by a handful of individual rulers call this a new order. It is not new and it is not order."

Engraved above the statue of Thomas Jefferson, at his Memorial in Washington, D.C., are his words: "I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man."

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@MaryElizabethSings


"A quotation is a handy thing to have about, saving one the trouble of thinking for oneself, always a laborious business."  A. A. Milne


In other words, the quotes are great to accentuate a point, but not to replace articulation of thought.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@CharterStarter_Too @MaryElizabethSings 

Nowadays, one doesn't even need to "have [it] about," or remember it oneself.  Just Google "quotes" and an author, and there it is, at www.great-quotes.com or www.brainyquote.com. Einstein has a number of such sites.....

Bitcoined
Bitcoined

Empower parents to make REAL choices by giving them tuition vouchers which can be used in any public or private school. The rest will quickly sort itself out.

And the blog's naysayers can go henpeck elsewhere.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@Bitcoined They are many parents who have internalized too deeply hopelessness and helplessness. Fostering hope and internal loci of control among these folks will be tough. One hundred-fifty years have passed since Tara but "the plantation mentality" lives strongly among too many.

dg417s
dg417s

Here's a major problem that I see. The biggest part of CCRPI (which, by the way, if you sound out the acronym is "crappy") is student achievement - in other words - how many kids actually passed the test. That's a problem. From what I hear, we'll now get 1/2 point for kids who are level 2, 1 point for level 3 (which in the EOC grade conversion is an 83, higher than a "B") and 1.5 for a level 4. I can't confirm that, but it's what I have been told. There is a smaller component for student growth. Well, let's take classes that are SLO classes and the teacher evaluation is based on the pre/post model. I don't know about all districts, but in mine, the model is far from perfect. Not just not perfect - very far from it. Students need to "grow" 40% of their potential over the course of the class. So a student who hypothetically makes a 20 on the pre test only needs a 52 on the post test to make the expected growth and the teacher to be deemed a success (and that's a problem when 52 is mathematically impossible to achieve based on the test itself). Well, that student technically did fail, after all, a 52 is an "F", but he or she grew. The biggest portion of CCRPI would not give credit for that student's growth. We're not asking for perfection, but what we have is so far from that it isn't fair to anyone. Maybe now that NCLB and the waivers are a thing of the past, the state will step back on this and really look at doing what's right for students and educators (and thus the public in general).

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@dg417s


I am in agreement with you about many of these flaws.  The state is addressing the heavy weighting on absolute achievement and moving it to a higher percentage weighting on growth, which is very needed.  

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@MaryElizabethSings @dg417s


Mary Elizabeth, you always have a complaint and something being implemented but never a solution.  Please, give some solutions.  


Theoretically, you are so right about the need for schools and teachers to focus on creative imaginations of teachers and kids, but the state is dealing with hundreds of thousands of kids and needs a practical way to determine competency of a school and to make decisions about resource allocation and policy.  And parents need to know how their schools are performing.  Surely you can recognize that?  Please, offer some practicable, actionable solutions if you disagree with what is being implemented.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@CharterStarter_Too 

I was a certified Data Collector who assessed teachers through that State of Georgia instrument that is now, I understand, obsolete because it was simply too mechanistic. 

I decided that being a full time Data Collector was not for me, even though I had achieved the course study necessary to earn state certification in Data Collection as well as in being a Reading Supervisor - both through 2005, after my retirement. 


Creating the largest secondary Reading Department in the state of Georgia was what I had preferred giving my time, effort, and commitment to because I was interested in stretching the humanity of those around me (teachers, students, parents) as well as stretching their academic progress.


I am retired now so it is not my job to supply the specific answers you seek.  I now play the role of  questioner so that we, collectively as citizens and as educators, do not become totally accepting of any assessment instrument that we might use, and so that we will always keep within our collective kens the value of the intangible and spiritual.  I have always questioned accepted norms, and I suppose I always will.  Nothing personal.  That is where I see myself adding to the quality of educational endeavors in Georgia.


CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@MaryElizabethSings @CharterStarter_Too


I sincerely respect your experience and service to public education.  And no, it is not your "job" as a retired educator to seek solutions; however, it is your responsibility (and mine) as a citizen to positively influence things that impact our communities, particularly in areas where we have the knowledge to help. Furthermore, it is our moral obligation to better our communities.


You have the knowledge and experience to DO something other than cast stones at every darn effort at improving public education in our state. Improvement (reform) does not mean the current system is under attack.  It may mean that the old must go away to be replaced by new thinking.  You mention looking for new ways of doing things, and yet, anything that challenges the old way of doing things you find a problem with and criticize.  


I implore you to use your knowledge and experience to make a difference, because casting stones on blog at people trying to make a difference is just a colossal waste of time and expertise.



MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@CharterStarter_Too 

I regret that you perceive my intent and my words as "casting stones."  You persist in misreading and caricaturing my words.


I have already given you support through alerting you to the need for assessing the creative and the degree of human growth as well as the data points of mental growth.  You can simply continue to write negatives about my input or you can turn my suggestions into the positives which was my intent in my posting here this evening.


No one did more to reform traditional public schools than I attempted to do during my career.  How it is done is in the mind, before it becomes manifested as reality. I have shared much sophisticated instructional knowledge that I implemented into reality while I was an educator.  How I related to all demonstrated my humanity for others to model if they chose to do so.  Start with:  "All men are created equal" and with believing it to one's core.  It is a spiritual belief as much as the foundation of our democracy, and when it is practiced in love and care, our schools come to life.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@dg417s 

I see much programmed, mechanistic knowledge via data points in this testing instrument, but little to assess the deepened humanity, or growth in the creative imaginations of students, teachers, and schools.

The accepted testing instrument often determines the societal outcomes it values as valid.  Are we aware that we might be creating a mechanistic society through well-intended, but limited, criteria for assessment of our students, teachers, and schools?

CSpinks
CSpinks

@dg417s We want both growth and achievement of a standard for our kids. But the latter trumps the former as an ultimate goal.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

More from the mind of Albert Einstein:


"The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."


"Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding."

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

Albert Einstein:  "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them."


In the educational arena, I would point out that sizing up academic progress through the gross labels of A, B, C, D, F, in students and in schools, is the same simplistic thinking that got us where we are today in creating educational disparities that are not being addressed adequately.  We must think with more complexity, and more educational sophistication, regarding what produces educational success in more students.

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@MaryElizabethSings


Mary Elizabeth, I agree with you completely.  This is a complex issue. The truth is that the INPUTS for the grading system are very complex.  The OUTPUTS (i.e., the rating of A-F) are intentionally simplistic and easy to understand.  

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

The author is spouting the same failed-reformer rhetoric and is drinking out of the same Jeb Bush fountain on the baseless use of school grading. How do you know that the rating is based on something that is reliably measured and can the data be verified? Yes, we all want educational excellence but instituting a grading system that parents will look at and in a split second make the determination that an A grade is best without knowing what is behind is is lazy educational politics at best. 

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

The state has explained the data that the system will use. It is based on growth data and related factors.

The ultimate laziness is responding on a blog before you read the information available about a topic.

As Cadman noted, the system is not perfect, and it will need some refining, but it is better than no system at all. Parents can't dig through the convoluted academic data to determine if a school is overall performing well. Why would you want parents to be in the dark? What possible motive other than hiding poor performance? I cannot understand your perspective.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

How do you know what the state is measuring as growth is valid and reliable? Just like filling in a bubble to answer a question is the laziest form of testing for knowledge so is your statement and the author's piece quoting the same old rhetoric. To say it's not perfect but will do is a lazy man's point of view. Yes, we should know how are schools are doing bit this is not it.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

Please show me how you know, for a fact, that this method is research based, reliable and valid.

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

Milestones is not just multiple choice. It has a written component for every section that provides some indication of depth in understanding. No test is perfect, but it is fairly objective, which is better than only subjective measures.

Tell me, smart one, how would YOU determine growth and quality of a school? And be sure to consider practicalities like time, objectivity, staffing for assessment, budget, and other key factors. I will await your solution.

Christie_S
Christie_S

@CharterStarter_Too You know, as a teacher I would not object at all to being accountable to an end-of-year test...if the test were given at the beginning of the year and then again at the end of the year.


Pre- and post-test remain both valid and reliable as long as the test measures what it is supposed to be measuring - namely, growth towards state standard.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@CharterStarter_Too


You still haven't answered my question as to how you know, beyond a doubt, that what is being measured is reliable and valid. When you do that then I will give you my answer. 

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@CharterStarter_Too


Just out of curiosity, how did you chose a school for your child before? My guess is that you knew because you didn't buy a home in a disadvantaged area of town where there is a high number of low ses students. My other guess is that this system is merely designed to put those schools on the at-risk of a state charter take over bid, which is another failed system.

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too 

First of all, the test itself, Milestones, was created to better match the intended uses for the assessment - that is, as an indicator (not exhaustive) of student performance, as an indicator (not exhaustive) for teacher performance, and as an indicator (not exhaustive) of school level performance.  The test itself, which has been aligned to the curriculum, was developed by  educators in our state, business leaders in our state, and reviewed by national experts for validity. 

Under the old CRCT format, it was strictly multiple choice questions aligned to state standards. Milestones provides another level of reliability for performance in requiring constructed response.  These questions, aligned to the state's standards, provide further information on the depth of understanding rather than being dependent upon simply multiple choice where a good guess on a given day will never tell the whole story.  In addition, interrater reliability is utilized as the tests are scored.  These raters are educators who not only know the standards, but understand the level required for demonstration of mastery.  The scoring itself provides a RANGE for how well a child might score.


As for the information Milestones will, IN PART, provide that will inform a school's "grade," perhaps the most notable is the calculation for Student Growth Percentiles.  The method being used has been adopted by upwards of 20 states and is the most sound method used for reliably calculating growth.  Students are compared against like peers and based on past performance through a pretty complicated algorithm national experts have determined is BOTH valid and reliable.  That means that a school serving very at risk students has just as good of a shot of showing sustained progress as a school serving affluent, high performing youth.  


Look, no test is perfect, nor is any method for determining student growth, but the system being employed is heads above anything we have ever had.  There are things that need work - the norm referenced piece, for example, and how it is calculated, but that is a known.  Also, the WAY delayed results are nearly useless to educators in classrooms at present.  There is work to do; however, the state's methods that will be utilized for the purpose of providing parents with a basic way of seeing the RELATIVE quality of  school is both reasonable and appropriate.  And again, it is better than having them in the dark with the big nothing we currently have.


Ok, so I addressed your question. I would truly like to know your thoughts on a better solution than what the state has come up with. 

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too 

You know, a lot of parents go to Great Schools for the same type of info.  Great Schools shows only absolute achievement information and provides what I feel is flawed information that does NOT consider critical factors, such as demographics, that can play into a school's performance.  Certainly the system is better than the only other alternative out there for parents savvy enough to look.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@CharterStarter_Too @sneakpeakintoeducation


Thanks for the reply. 


My method of assessment would be a pre/post test on the subject matter. A portfolio including a sampling of all the student's work throughout the year. So many more things go into a successful school and educational learning than that of a data point/test score.


With regards to your statement above, can you please provide links to confirm that the tests were indeed developed by teachers. Also, you say that the complicated algorithm has been deemed valid and reliable. Again please provide proof because the American Statistical Association has deemed it the opposite of what you say, which is pretty meaningful. They have warned against using any type of VAM growth model because it is extremely unreliable.


http://www.amstat.org/policy/pdfs/ASA_VAM_Statement.pdf

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too


This has turned into a great conversation - thanks! 


Ok, so let me give you another way to think about the Milestones.  The test itself crosses over grades, in that it provides questions from the grade before and the grade after to determine below and above grade level performance.  It is, in essence a pre-test for the next level in the leveled questions and in the way the scores are reported.  I am in agreement with you and Christy S. in theory that a pre and post exam is the best indicator, but I just think that the Milestones in effect does that.


As for VAM, the deal is that the Georgia Student Growth Model is not a value-added model, as it does not provide a predictor.  Here is a good reference for this from the GaDOE:  https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Assessment/Documents/SGP Guide 122112.pdf


I am also in agreement with you that there is a whole lot more that goes into a successful school than one data point.  That is why the state is not using just one data point.  There are are a variety of data points that are used in CCRPI that will drive the rating, and Milestones is just one of them.  Admittedly, CCRPI has some issues, but from what I have been hearing, those that concern me are being addressed.


Again, the system is just a way for parents to see how a school serving a given population is doing with their students.  It is intended to improve transparency.

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too


There are a lot of anecdotal reasons I believe this, but a big reason is actually grounded in data, and that is the dismally low number of parents who are eligible to move schools that are perpetually failing who choose not to leave the one they are in .... 


Here's a great resource so you can see what I mean.  The study attached gets into a lot of reasons for mobility, but even looking at it on its face, we can take a few examples of districts with a TON of perpetually failing schools (i.e., DeKalb, APS, Clayton) and see that churn rates for these districts are at only about 30%  (DeKalb 27.9%, APS 29.8%; Clayton 31%).  If you cross over this with the schools we know are so bad that the state could take them over, we see a slightly higher churn rate for some of  the individual schools (4-10% higher), but still not a mass exodus like one would expect for such abysmal academic results. We know from the regression analysis that the lower the socio economic rate, the higher the mobility rate.  And so, if the max for these districts is on average only about 30%, that tells me that parents likely don't know just how bad these schools are.  I'd like to believe that if parents really knew the quality of the school AND that they had some choice, they would not stay in a perpetually failing school. 


I hope this helps you see why I drew that conclusion. 

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too


I wanted to also address your idea of portfolios.  I absolutely support the use of these for ascertaining a student's progress.  The use of portfolios, however, is difficult to quantify in any usable way at a statewide level and is best used at the school level.  I hope ALL schools are using portfolios to refine instruction, ascertain progress, and to differentiate; however, I don't think we could use them as an input for measuring a school's overall  performance.  If you had someone (and for interrater reliability, multiple someones) come in to review the portfolios, it may be possible to quantify it their quality some way, but the practicalities of time, human resources, and cost would be prohibitive.

dg417s
dg417s

@CharterStarter_Too Um, actually, no. It doesn't have writing on every thing. Only math and ELA tests have writing. Science and Social Studies are straight multiple choice and from what I heard from the state, that won't change.



CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too 

Most parents don't KNOW the quality of the schools.  Socioeconomic area does, as research indicates, often show low absolute achievement, but how would a poor parent know if the school their child is attending is GROWING kids, even though they might be performing at an absolute level lower than affluent counterparts?  And don't assume that a school that has middle to higher income students is growing their kids either.

As for the take-over supposition, they don't need an A-Z rating to do this.  They can do this with the scores alone.



CSpinks
CSpinks

@CharterStarter_Too @sneakpeakintoeducation I don't pretend to know much about the details of CCRPI but I was impressed with John Barge's explanation of CCRPI at a meeting sponsored by The Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education a couple of years ago. And I trust John Barge. GaDOE's loss was McIntosh County's gain.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too "The perfect is the enemy of the better." My bias favors statistical analyses employing "Big Data" and advanced computing to help determine a more accurate determination of teacher-, administrator-, school-, and system-level contributions to student achievement as measured by valid, reliable standardized tests.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@CharterStarter_Too @sneakpeakintoeducation Have you ever seen people who are interviewed and they are asked if schools are failing and they say yes. The catch is that when asked about their neighborhood school, they say they are great and wouldn't move because they understand that everything that happens in a school can't be reduced to a data point. 


I would also suggest that the schools you deem as dismal are serving our students who come from a low ses background and, quite frankly, you cannot educate yourself our of poverty. You cannot provide instruction to a child who is living in dire poverty, doesn't know where their next meal is coming from, has an unstable family life. Instead of expecting that the privatization of our schools is going to help these students, which we already know that answer to that is no, then look to what we know does work;providing wrap around services to ensure that the student is ready and able to learn. Please look up Maslow's Heirarchy of Needs to see why this is important. 

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@CharterStarter_Too @sneakpeakintoeducation

Some good reading but I feel like I am reading a promotional brochure with limited information. I guess what I'm looking for (and will search for) is an unbiased report on the design and implementation of the Milestones. Our children are tested to death. Enough already. We know the grading system is designed specifically for the privatization of schools. There is no proof that charter systems provide a better education for our students. And that's not my opinion, it has been researched. After 20 years of the status-quo reform efforts, charters aren't the answer. Furthermore, I'd like to say the original intent of charters was that they were to be setup as laboratories to see what does and doesn't work for our children and then share between schools and districts. If you institute a business-like schooling model, the secret sauce will not be shared because they will always want a bigger piece of the pie and they won't want to teach the harder-to-teach children. The attrition rates at charters are astoundingly high. 

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too


First, I am not sure you will find anything on Milestones more detailed than what the state can supply, as it is a Georgia created test.  If you find something better, please let me know.


As for charters, I really don't want to get into a protracted discussion about chartering on this topic, as it is irrelevant.  I will say 2 things and leave it at that: 


1.  Charters not working have been or are in the process of being shuttered - which is what should happen.  The vast majority are performing strongly and offering a great option for parents.  You can check this out based on the annual report produced by the DOE for the legislature each year - or check CCRPI scores. 


2.  Your commentary on attrition rates in charters is not accurate on the whole.  Check out the report on mobility where each of the schools are listed.  Those with high attrition rates are either drop out recovery schools and have attrition rates comparable to other dropout recovery schools OR have very poor performance and are currently in the process of being shuttered or are under tight rein of authorizers and will be shuttered if they don't get on track operationally and academically.  Parents move with their feet, which they should.  

CharterStarter_Too
CharterStarter_Too

@sneakpeakintoeducation @CharterStarter_Too


I beg to differ on educating a child out of poverty.  I came from a very impoverished background, so I believe it can make a difference.


Secondly, the topic is getting off track and moving to charters again, which is not the focus of this blog topic.  I'd like to say that charters on the whole does not equate to "privatization."  Yes, SOME are OPERATED by management organizations, but they are run by non-profit boards who govern them.  


Finally, we HAVE tons and tons of services offered through the public school system.  Adding more is NOT going to matter.  You have to offer school environments with very strong cultures that compete with the gang/poverty cultures these kids go home to every day.  That is why KIPP and other 90-90-90 schools (traditional public and charter public both) are successful.  Any school getting results out of impoverished kids have a drastically different culture than a typical school environment.  Expectations are higher, discipline is addressed, support and engagement of the family unit is a critical component. The instruction may be equal in both settings, but the culture is what makes the difference.  I believe that with every ounce of my being.  The thing with charters is that they can start FRESH and build a culture rather than trying to change embedded culture with an established staff.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@sneakpeakintoeducation After 45 years of close and closer observations, I'm most suspicious of the honesty of the educracy in The Twin Towers.

HILUX
HILUX

It's too bad, but any grading system which threatens the status quo will be attacked here.

As are accountability and parental choice.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@HILUX I'm all for accountability of ALL involved, as are most teachers!

CSpinks
CSpinks

What criteria will be used in the proposed grading system be? Who will determine whether or not schools meet these criteria?


Hopefully, such a grading system for schools would be much more accurate and, therefore, informative than the current student grading system.