Opinion: If governor wants to revolutionize Atlanta and DeKalb schools, enable kids to escape them

Atlanta attorney Glenn Delk has been urging greater school choice in Georgia for 25 years and has done legal work for charter schools. He notes most of the work has been pro bono.

Today, he responds to several AJC news stories on proposed legislation to rein in school spending, reforms in Atlanta Public Schools and the governor’s education agenda.

By Glenn Delk

Gov. Nathan Deal has called for an “education revolution” in Georgia.  Given the attitudes expressed in recent stories by supporters of the current monopoly known as government-run schools, Gov. Deal needs to create a new education market by passing legislation which a) gives all parents the right and economic means to choose among traditional public, public charter and private schools, and b) gives public and charter school teachers the same control enjoyed by their private school counterparts over their profession.

???????????????????The news stories are indicative of the current belief system among public school board members, bureaucrats and supporters that they should be allowed to continue operating a monopoly that would be illegal in any other business.

The first article, about a resolution before the Cobb Board of Education which would condition a student’s ability to participate in extracurricular activities on mandatory parental participation in school activities, is a natural extension of the belief that traditional school board members have absolute power to set tax rates, to determine attendance zones, and to punish students if parents don’t act as the school board sees fit.

In the second article, Atlanta Superintendent Meria Carstarphen tells state lawmakers; “Stop taking any more money from Atlanta Public Schools.”

According to Dr. Carstarphen, referring to a potential reduction in tax revenue: “…It was like $30 or $50 million — if both of those things happen, we might as well go home…”  However, she ignores the fact APS is effectively operating a monopoly where she and the Board of Education have the absolute power to spend nearly $14,000 per student or $682 million of taxpayers’ money annually, according to its 2015-2016 budget.

Given that level of spending, a first grader in today’s APS will have nearly $170,000 of tax dollars spent on his/her education by the time of graduation, to deliver academic results which now place 60 percent of APS schools at risk of state takeover due to poor academic performance, as evidenced by the recent Georgia Milestones results which disclosed that seven out of ten APS high school students are not be proficient in literature, geometry, biology, algebra and U.S. History; 95 of 100 APS students are not proficient in physical science.

Even Dr.  Carstarphen, at a public meeting on Oct,1, 2015, admitted APS was “effectively broken.” Despite her admission, she announced Thursday her administration would close or merge some schools, allow charters to run some APS schools, and retain her monopoly control over the future of 49,000 students.

A better solution, in light of a broken system delivering abysmal academic results, would be to give the parents of those students, most of whom are low-income minority students, the same ability as wealthier parents to choose APS, or use the $14,000 per student for tuition at a private school.

Finally, the AJC reported some state legislators publicly oppose a bill to reduce the ability of the DeKalb Board of Education to assess taxes above the constitutional limit on millage rates. Once again, supporters of the current public school monopoly believe the only answer is for the government to have the absolute power to spend more money on the current monopoly.

Given these attitudes, the only way Gov. Deal can start an education revolution before he leaves office is pass legislation which frees teachers and parents from the current monopoly. He should start by using APS and DeKalb County schools as pilot programs; those two systems have nearly 150,000 students enrolled, spending over $1.5 billion of taxpayer funds annually.

The governor should allow parents of the 150,000 students in Atlanta and DeKalb to voluntarily opt-out of the current monopoly by receiving an education savings account evidenced by a debit card, pre-loaded with $7500 per student annually.  Parents could use the cards to choose the best education for each child, whether at a private, out-of-district public, or charter school. Any funds not spent in one year could be carried forward as savings for college.

In addition to giving all parents the freedom and economic means to choose the best school for every child, the governor should also give those teachers who wish to leave the current monopoly, the power to control their professions by allowing them to self-regulate, just as lawyers and doctors do.  In other words, teachers in the new system would be free to determine the requirements for teachers, to set their own salaries, and to form their own schools to serve the needs of each student.

If these two things happened, Gov. Deal would make Georgia unique in the nation, breaking the current government monopoly in public education, taking away from bureaucrats and politicians control of the money and teaching profession.   If Gov. Deal truly wants to revolutionize education in Georgia, he will take these two simple steps, effectively making parents “owners” of their child’s education, and teachers “owners” of their own schools.

Reader Comments 0

75 comments
class80olddog
class80olddog

The posters on this blog claim to care about the children that attend school, but it is apparent that the ONLY real solution to save some of these students is to take them away from their loser parent(s) at an early age and get them out of a toxic environment. Some of these children were conceived solely to increase the welfare benefits of the mother.  The posters here also want the kids whose parent(s) really care about them, but lack the financial wherewithal to move, to be TRAPPED in the failing school systems with the other dregs of society.

satan
satan

If they flee APS...the place(s) they end up will inherit the same issues... It's not the schools or the teachers in the schools, folks.  It's the students themselves and more importantly, the family or lack of family they have. 

Starik
Starik

@satan Yes, but it's in everybody's interest to educate as many of these kids as we can; learn and you can leave the 'hood behind. 

Cere
Cere

Why propose using tax dollars for tuition at private schools? I agree that this would only subsidize middle and upper class parents - allowing them to 'escape' under-performing schools while leaving poor children in the dust. Private schools DO pick and choose their students regardless of ability to pay. And God forbid should you have a child with learning disabilities. I have always said that "Christian" private schools seriously need to drop the "Christian" from their description. Yes, they are private for sure - but following in the ways of Christ? No way.  Can you imagine Jesus saying, "Bring the little children to me... I want the top 10% so, test them and send those under the 90th percentile over to Caesar."  That's essentially what private "Christian" schools do.


Just let parents choose ANY school in the entire school system and see what happens. Inspire competition among the schools you already control.  Oh, and then cut the fat so that you can hire more teachers to reduce the number of students per teacher. It ain't rocket science. Respect children and treasure them as the future responsible citizens you would like them to become. Limit the 'chair time' to what is truly necessary, including a lot of time for art, music, play and sports. Offer extra help to those students identified early as needing it. Hire lots of great teachers, then fully support them and things will turn around. 


Adding more administrators has never helped.  Trying new multi-million dollar programs has never helped. Making children do more of the same has never helped.

Starik
Starik

@Cere "Just let parents choose ANY school in the entire school system and see what happens."  That's what happened in DeKalb, which is now a segregated school system. Black parents who cared about their kids' education transferred them to majority white/Asian schools in the northern part of the county. Then parents who worried about their kids' gang involvement and criminal activity transferred their kids to the same school.  Schools that formerly excelled in college preparation became schools focused on athletics and graduation, not college. Black parents who care about education transfer their kids somewhere farther north. White and Asian parents move or send their kids to private schools. 

Now the school is down to the 10% of whites and Asians who can't move because of financial problems, or the parents are alcoholics/addicts, or in prison, or have been expelled from their private school for drug use or other misbehavior. 

Resegregation. Except in Decatur, where students have to live in the Decatur school district. 

Teedubs
Teedubs


So following the same logic if a community thinks their monopolistic police force is under-serving them they can simply get their per person share of the police budget and hire their own security?  Ditto for everyone who thinks the monopolistic DOT isn't spending enough on transit?  Real problem but flawed logic starting with the word monopoly. The place to correct an unresponsive government unit is the ballot box.  



Starik
Starik

@Teedubs There is no monopolistic police force - many cities and counties have police departments, all counties have a Sheriff's Department, everybody has the GBI and then there's FBI, DEA, US Marshal and a plethora of other agencies.  Most of our transportation funding, and accompanying regulation, comes from the US government - or cities, or counties, or the State.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

Legislators are scared to make true reforms. They could immediately legislate:


1. Detailed budgets and expenditures posted online according to a standard form that allows taxpayers to easily see how and where their money is spent for all schools including the state charter schools and private schools that receive state tax credit money.


2. A high % of funds are spent in the classroom.


But these wouldn't allow more segregation and payoffs for charter school donors, friends, and family.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@class

Let me fix your post: SCHOOL SYSTEMS don't want to follow the FAILED reforms that have already been tried and failed in other states.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@AvgGeorgian  Let me fix your post:  SCHOOL SYSTEMS are scared to make true reforms - then your two points would apply.  But then they wouldn't allow more payoffs for school employees, their friends and family.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@class80olddog @AvgGeorgian


Why would you not want the legislature to do its job? They make the laws that all systems have to follow. Do you not want all schools that take taxpayer money to be held accountable to the taxpayer?

class80olddog
class80olddog

@AvgGeorgian @class80olddog  Did the legislature make laws that required schools to socially promote all students?  NO!  As a matter of fact, they made a law that required that students NOT be socially promoted unless a very strict set of circumstances are followed - which schools perverted to allow 95% od failing kids to be socially promoted.  Who did that?  SCHOOLS (administrators)!!!!!!

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@class80olddog @AvgGeorgian

No, the legislature took away the one test that helped stop social promotion - the GHSGT. They took away any hope for accountability for a diploma.

gactzn2
gactzn2

Interesting that the GOP would suddenly be concerned about the children of historically depressed neighborhood schools.  Using voo-doo analytics, which they construct, they do two things before creating an opportunity (profit-based) school district.  First, generate the analytics by which the above described schools will always fail- after all these are economically depressed neighborhoods.  Next,  decrease the credibility of educators of students in these schools through fabricated notions that the teachers are failing the students, when teachers are but one part of a more complex equation.  In doing so, you create the "perception" (Georgia loves that) that these educators have been underwhelming in performing their duties and responsibilities and generate callused opinions towards educators of students in these schools, all while contrasting them with for-profit alternatives which can only offer a fraction of the resources traditional schools can.


When considering the sheer number of impoverished communities that APS serves, it is obvious that there is no way to filter or water down scores to fly under the radar of the state's system for "grading schools" (AvgGeorgian alluded to the watering down of averages).  The state has legislated rules that force school districts with impoverished communities to turn their schools over to the state, for a period of time, so they can "manage the money" that is made off of federal Title 1 monies.  

This is truly about profiting from federal tax dollars and is no different than what for-profit colleges have done- and can no longer get away with.  Why is this an acceptable alternative for black children then, considering that overwhelming evidence shows it does not work?  


(It reeks of modern-day slave trading - as I am of the opinion that they would continue to not care about these kids if it were not for the pay load associated with them (federal dollars- attract new business).

Starik
Starik

@gactzn2 In the nearly all-black schools in the Atlanta, Fulton and Clayton counties, and others, everybody from the School Board and Superintendent to the teachers to the students are black.  How are they different from segregated schools before 1954?

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

How utterly strange and greedy that so many choicers start with the assumption that ALL taxpayers' education taxes belong only to that special elite known as PWSAC (Parents With School Aged Children), and only PWSAC should be given other taxpayers money to spend as they choose.


Notice that Delk doesn't demand a voucher only in the amount of taxes paid by PWSAC. I would be for that - you remove your child from the public school system and in return get a tax credit of your education taxes. That would be fair - you get back YOUR money and make YOUR choice. You don't get to make a choice with other people's money.


Funny how with Delk's business being what it is, his plan might have a large amount of that choice money wind up in his pocket.

Another comment
Another comment

I would be happy with that one since Fulton county keeps raising the taxes in my neighborhood to a minimum of $7,500, going up to $10,000 , 12,000, $20000. I have appealed my taxes three times in the last 5 years because they keep forgetting to hold the appeal I won, or honor the Law on sale Prices passed in 2011.

But instead we have all off the illegals and section 8s filled with mamas Felon gang banger boy friends living in the Class C apartments close by. That 66 unit building was purchased for 1.4 M in 2011 and Fulton county reduced the tax value without appeal to 1.1M last year ( on acreage alone it is worth more .67 lots sell for $400k plus and this property is over 3 -4 acres. It has 66 apartments that divides out to a value of 37.5 K per unit . The property taxes are less than $400 per year with school taxes of less than $300 per year. If you get behind the bus you will see an average of 3 kids per unit. All either ESOL or section 8. All Free and reduced lunch.

Sandy Springs police report that over 90% of the crime and fire reports come from these Class C type apartments.

I also do not understand why the visitors aka non legal residents parents and visa stays are not being required to pay tuition to attend our schools. My have friends that have gotten Foriegn assignments in Foriegn countries they have to be tuition or put their children in an international school with tuition. No other country allows anyone to just plop their children in school. It is maddening in Fulton county that you harassed more if you own a house to prove you own the house to be in district, yet you can use a Mexican Passport and a letter in Spanish that you are your cousins remote with your 4 kids in a one bedroom apartment.

I am sure those in the $2-3 million mansions in buckhead and Sandy springs who are paying $20-40k plus in school taxes would love to get that back to go against the $26k in Westminster , Pace, Lovett, Marist taxes. Then Folks like me and my 30 neighbors will take our 7,500 to 10k too because not a single person in my neighborhood has their child in school beyond Heards Ferry. If they ever got rid of the zig zag that would be gone too.

Legong
Legong

Every monopoly involves players with vested interests in maintaining the status quo. In the case of public schools, these players masquerade as activists promoting the interests of children.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Another comment
Another comment

I would first of all like to know what private schools of any quality are available for $14,000 per year. All the quality ones even the Catholic's High schools Marist and Holy Spirit are $20k plus. Most have now raised their tuition to $26,000 per year. That is the going rate for ITP Private schools. Then the very few that have programs for students with mild special needs add even more on top.

I really don't know who he thinks that $7,500 is going to help! I paid $8,000 for the Catholic member rate in K-8 , 7 or 8 years ago. If you were not Catholic you paid an additional $3,000 on top of that. Then people complained about the suggestion of work requirements at Pepplebrook. I will tell at Catholic school their is a mandatory work requirement and the only way you will overcome that is to write a very large check and send your nanny to work you shifts. The auction routinely raised well over $100k as most of the private schools do. I and many volunteers worked our butts off to make that money on the auction. Then their were multiple other fundraisers, carnivals, fun runs, Sally Foster ( you better buy / sell $100 plus), Then there are annual drives. Grandparents days where grandparents are invited in, followed by holiday cards and fundraising material sent to Grandparents. This is what is sent how all the privates work.

Yes they each have a few token minorities. My daughter and I were laughing at how one of my South American friends whose child attended school with my daughter is going to flip out when she sees that another school in the Arch Dioceses used her daughters photo as clip art for the diversity photo. Her husband works for a fortune 50 company in upper mgmt. Her son would joke at Marist it was him and three high achieving Mexican sisters. Then a couple of chosen football players and doctors children.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Another comment I believe Mr. Delk and his ilk  mainly want to subsidize those who can already pay for private schools and maybe those who can almost pay. 


Mr Delk himself would make a huge profit off a large increase in charter school as that is his business.


Delk's somewhat regular and repetitive offerings could be seen as an unpaid ad to lobby/drum up business.

ATLPeach
ATLPeach

@Another comment  There are quality schools less than $14K. Just depends on where you live. And by quality, I do mean with certified teachers and AP courses.

AnotherMom
AnotherMom

Give parents the "right and economic means to choose a private school."  Parents don't get to "choose" private schools.  Private schools choose the children they want.  Good grief.

Cobbian
Cobbian

Basic education is a public good, not a private good.  That is why we pay taxes for it.  


There is an assumption going on here that consumers of education will do a better job of choosing the right education for the kids from the educational "products" made available in a "market place" and what is standing in their way is the "price" of those choices.  So the solution is to give the parents the money and let them decide how to spend it.  


But if the parents don't care about public schools or don't know how to make good decisions about how to make public schools healthy "products" for their kids, why do we think they can make better decisions in a "market place" of choices. At least in public schools there is some mechanism of control - elected school boards.  The only mechanism of control in a capitalist market place of education is for the parent to choose a different "product", if one is available.


The other issue is the product of education that is provided in a capitalist market place.  The goal of a business is to make a profit.  If there is no profit there is no product.  The focus is profit, not good education.  So the education will only be as good as the profit requires - and maybe allows.  What are the costs in eduction - facilities, staff, supplies?  Building, teachers, books.  What decisions will be made on how much to put into buildings, teachers books when the goal is to maximize profit?  Poor areas will get poor schools and rich areas will get rich schools and the only ones overseeing all this are state legislatures.  Oh, yeah, that will really work!


It makes equal sense to consider "privatizing" police and fire protection.  I am sure their are companies out there would love to get into those businesses.  

class80olddog
class80olddog

@Cobbian "The goal of a business is to make a profit." That is not always true - Goodwill is a business, but its purpose is not to make profit.  Non-profit hospitals do not have profit as their motive.  But even businesses that make profits do not have profits as their ONLY goal.  Their goal is to offer good product (AND to make a profit).  Unfortunately, it seems like the only goal of traditional schools is to exist and keep school employees in their job.  They are not concerned that their "product" sucks. 

Cobbian
Cobbian

@class80olddog @Cobbian There is something wrong with a political system in which the public services fail to do their jobs.  I don't have THE answer, but I do not believe that individuals privatizing what need to be public services is the answer.  I would not be able to afford to pay for private fire and police protection.  What happens to communities when they no longer have to work together for basics such as police protection and education for the kids?  What is the glue that holds them together?  What is a community?  

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

Should we privatize our political system because it fails? Moot point about nonprofit organizations because their structure allows for the ability to set high compensation packages without being answerable to who they serve. The neighborhoods that have paid for private security are usually the affluent ones who want to ensure the riff raff is kept out. The same happens in private schools via tuition. Again, moot point because their tax dollars aren't redirected from the police force or fire fighters. The number one goal of a for-profit business is profits above all else. Remember, greed is good. We have already seen a projected $5 billion waste and fraud in the charter school system. You also neglect to mention that having a fractured school system would be far less economical because of the added layers of management with lovely salary packages to boot. Hardly a good model to follow for efficiency.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

The public schools are more accountable to the public. Is there waste in any system? I believe the answer is yes but traditional public schools are accountable and school boards can be voted in and out, as it should be. I also beleve that corruption and fraud are more rampant in the non-traditional public schools, as the recent study pointed out.

Putting our schools into a non-democratic system seems very wrong.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@Cobbian Perfectly said. 


Also, another point that I think is missed is that schools have the opportunity to share best practices and ideas when they are not competing in a business-based environment. To have schools enter into a competitive mode would indeed stifle that since they would want to keep the "secret sauce" to themselves. 


I do believe that some people just think that private business always means better but that is absolutely not the case. Just look at private healthcare and the huge profits and salary packages their top echelons receive. The operating costs for the private healthcare market is much higher than that of medicare or other countries that have socialized healthcare. 



newsphile
newsphile

@class80olddog @Cobbian   First, Goodwill is a non-profit organization with 501(C)3 status.  It does follow some sound business practices.  Second, not-for-profit hospitals are horrific abusers of tax dollars.  Their non-profit status enables them to purchase and lease more property in GA's micro cities than any other entity.  Their CEOs are paid millions in annual salary, bonuses, perks, and retirement provisions.  Their books show no profits.  These abuses of taxpayers dollars with nothing in return for the students are exactly what we can expect with the plan you are supporting.  We don't want it!

class80olddog
class80olddog

@Cobbian Would you consider privatizing your fire service if your public service was so poor that people's houses burned to the ground before they responded?  Would you employ a private security service if the police were not protecting your neighborhood?  A lot of areas have done this.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@Cobbian @class80olddog  You are right, there IS something wrong when public services fail to do their jobs - this is the problem that we have with traditional schools.  If they would address their own issues, I would not be a proponent of charters and vouchers  - BUT THEY WON'T>

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Cobbian 

Many prisons have now been "privatized" and that has not worked out well for those incarcerated nor for society-as-a-whole.

jezel
jezel

@MaryElizabethSings @Cobbian And the penal and  criminal judicial system has become predatory ...as will the education system... once it is privatized. It is the nature of the beast.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

Exactly, it will become predatory with more money going to advertising and marketing with glossy brochures and tv commercials. When money goes in those areas you can bet they won't have enough to spend on teachers or the classroom.

satan
satan

@sneakpeakintoeducation @Cobbian There is no "secret sauce". It's called hiring educated and talented teachers and administrators with talent and vision.  Problem is..no educated and talented teacher wants to work in a failing school (why would they???).  Hint...there are not enough educated and talented teachers to go around..even at the "good" schools. Hint..until Georgia actually decides to value teaching as a profession and not baby sitting..this will never change. Hint..toughen up the teacher program entry requirements at the State colleges and then PAY them like professionals. In less than a generation, this is fixed. 

dg417s
dg417s

Someone mentioned it, but I'll say it again.... Monopoly = ZERO choice. You have choice. In fact, if you look at some of the choices within the DeKalb School System, you will see some of the top schools in the state. That being said, the choice is also draining the top students from the rest of the schools. The schools aren't the problem. Regardless of what Mr. Delk says, there is plenty of choice already. 


Let's look at the unintended consequences.... We take money away from public schools to give parents "choice" (and more money than they pay in school taxes), schools will lose population. That's a given regardless of how good the instructional program at a school is. Parents will feel there are better options for their own children. That's fine. We will need fewer schools. Schools will close. School buildings will become a blight on the community and lower property values. Look at what happened to Hooper Alexander before DCSD demolished the building. Imagine if that were, for example, Towers High School which is right in the middle of a neighborhood. Who wants to live near a falling apart building? 


Where will the $7,500 come from (and Maureen, if you can ask this to Mr. Delk, I'd appreciate a response). Personally, I pay approximately $3,000 to the schools if you take my direct property taxes and roughly 50% of the taxes I pay to the state in a given year. Why should I be entitled to $7,500 per child? Heck, with just one I'm making a profit on my education tax credit. If I had 3 like my parents have, that'd be $22,500. 


As it stands, I currently don't have any children, so all of my money and then all of my neighbor's tax dollars go to one child and his or her parent's choice? Where's my say in how those tax dollars are spent?


We have not been throwing money at schools for years - in fact, we have underfunded them according to existing law. Yes, the law is 30+ years old, but it is the law nonetheless. 


Finally, if the voters of DeKalb want to lower the school taxes, they need to vote in a Board of Education that will do that. They haven't. It should be up to the voters, not the state, to set the tax limit. If we wanted a 40 mil school tax, why can't we have it? Also, if we didn't have to donate so much money to Gwinnett, maybe we could lower our tax rate in DeKalb.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@dg417s I believe that monopoly could also mean "no reasonable choice".  You could say that the people of Flint, Michigan had a "choice" - they could have bought bottled water to drink, or installed filters themselves, or had a tank installed and water hauled to them.  All of them were "choices", they just were not "reasonable choices".  Same for the poor people of DeKalb and APS - they don't have the money to move to East Cobb, or to send their kids to private school - for them, the local traditional schools IS a virtual monopoly.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@sneakpeakintoeducation @class80olddog @dg417s I didn't say that vouchers or charters would solve all the problems of society - but it would give those parents who CARE a means to segregate their kids from the dregs of society that are dragging their kids down into the gutter with them. 

newsphile
newsphile

@OriginalProf @sneakpeakintoeducation @class80olddog @dg417s The big winners would be parents of children who are attending private schools and for-profit charter school management companies.  Our nearby charter school per pupil costs are higher than the school district and their students aren't performing as well as those in the local school district.  But, one of Deal's contributors is getting a lot of money plus his company will end up with the facilities, all at taxpayer expense.  This helps no one except the companies' owners. 

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

It looks like you're harking back to the days of segregation and trying to enforce another set of jim crow laws by another name. Shame on you.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@dg417s "If we wanted a 40 mil school tax, why can't we have it?"  - because it would be "the tyranny of the majority" - homeowners who pay almost nothing in property tax can set a high millage rate and the people with expensive homes pay the bulk of the tax.  All they need is a 50% +1 vote.  THAT is why there is a State limit. 

Cere
Cere

@dg417s As far as the DeKalb millage rate goes - I agree that it's illegal. They raised it long ago to cover the costs of running a technical college - DeKalb Tech, which became Piedmont Tech. Also with some connection to Perimeter College - now GA State. They haven't run this tech school in decades, yet the tax has remained.  Ditto for raising the rate back in the 'Great Recession'... which was done under the pretense of an 'emergency', with the 'promise' of lowering it after they balanced the books.  Well, property values have returned or even surpassed the lost value during the recession, yet the tax rate has remained the same. In fact, it's worse - instead of lowering the tax rate to accommodate for the rise in property values, Michael Thurmond duped the people of DeKalb by boasting that he was not going to raise the tax rate!!!  He did not disclose that their tax bill would be going up exponentially due to the high rate and the increased values. Very tricky. But then again, that's what they get for hiring a politician as superintendent.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@class80olddog @dg417s


The schools in East Cobb, North Fulton, etc... don't have students with the problems that our inner city schools have because they are affluent and have the things necessary to  that they will success in school before they enter the doors in the morning and when they leave at night. By insinuating that getting them into a private school will cure them of all their "ills" is showing your inability to acknowledge that you cannot educate yourself our of some of the issues these children and their families have to deal with on a daily basis. Please educate yourself on Maslow's Heirarchy of Needs to see that you cannot educate yourself out of poverty. Giving these children a voucher, as Mr. Delk suggests, won't help and you can bet your bottom dollar that the private schools will not accept those children anyway. As usual, you fail to understand that putting our schools into private hands is not the answer. And by the way, public schools are NOT a monopoly; they are a public institution run for the public good, not to make a profit or make those that run schools under the guise of a non-profit but take large salaries. The same could be said for what you consider to be monopolies like the police force, army, firefighters, libraries, etc....

dg417s
dg417s

@Cere @dg417s I will say this much - the tax rate is set by a resolution of the Board of Education, not by will or decree of the superintendent. If we, as DeKalb voters, want a lower tax rate, make those campaigning for the Board of Education promise to vote for it and hold them to that promise. Otherwise, the majority of voters in DeKalb are fine with it or too apathetic to do anything about it. Frankly, we could lower the bill just by getting rid of equalization.

class80olddog
class80olddog

@sneakpeakintoeducation  No, I am not proposing segregation by skin color.  What you are proposing is trapping black students who COULD escape the 'hood and be productive citizens in failing schools with the gangbangers.  Shame on YOU!