This is one Georgia teacher’s story of a demoralizing evaluation, but it’s every teacher’s nightmare

The biggest education bill of this legislative session, Senate Bill 364, focuses on changing how teachers are evaluated in Georgia. While every teacher in the state understands why this bill is vital to the future of education, many parents do not.

Here is an excerpt from the blog of former public schoolteacher Malorie Leighann HubauerShe explains clearly why Georgia’s cumbersome evaluation process is driving out good teachers, including her.

I am beginning the excerpt at the point where Hubauer has returned to the classroom after having two children and cancer. But she finds a much different climate now under the state’s new eval process, a climate that she finds demoralizes teachers and undermines learning.

You can go to her blog for the full piece.

By Malorie Leighann Hubauer

That first year back was exhausting, but the fire was roaring. I was nominated for teacher of the year the first year there—and I wasn’t even eligible. Parents were supportive. Students were dedicated. Administration was on our team.

teacherhidingThe next year, the state fully implemented the new teacher evaluation system and some alarming directives on how to evaluate the teachers. I was determined that with my heart for teaching, this would not change a thing; teachers have to be flexible and adapt after all.

Any guesses on how long it took my roaring fire to become ashes and soot?

Less than three months (and that’s being generous).

How could this happen to me? I was born to teach. How could I, who at 7 years old taught her little sister how to read and write, add multi-digit numbers, and even states of matter all before sister was old enough to be in pre-school, transform into a person who can’t fathom the idea of toughing it out until the end of the semester – let alone the end of the school year?

I couldn’t get past the fact that I felt my career identity had been demolished, and more importantly, my heart experiencing such a dramatic change in a glimmer of time. Here is part one of a series on my reasons for why I cannot continue to teach in public education (and, I suspect, why others can’t either):

Every day is spent playing defense.

When you are naturally talented at what you do, it can be difficult to hear about your own shortcomings or mistakes. The teacher evaluation system, however, went beyond pointing out flaws. Of course I wanted feedback about how to improve! I will never claim to be the best, the image of perfection, the role model for all. I know I have growth areas. What I don’t need to do is defend every decision I make.

Literally. Every. Single. Decision.

Have you ever had to justify why a colleague needed to stand in your doorway while you ran to the restroom after six hours of holding it? What about an explanation for why a student, who has failed every subject nearly every year, is now failing your class? What is it you are not doing that this student is absent so frequently? Why did your class sit at this lunch table instead of that one? Why did you give this student a silent lunch? Follow up: We need a written statement explaining your reason for our files. Did you use data to decide on that homework assignment?

Teachers know all too well that it truly doesn’t matter if a problem is out of your control or not; you will be held accountable for an explanation and a solution.

I always received good marks on my evaluations, until the state trickled down a complaint to administrators saying too many level 3s were being given and they expect more 2s instead (which is considered a “not-passing score”). Coincidentally, I received my very first 2 on one category the next evaluation.

When I exercised my right to complete a written response to the score and posted it onto the state platform, I immediately received a private email from my evaluator suggesting a conference. I declined. What was the point? Did I really need to waste my already thinly spread planning time to have someone who barely knows what goes on in my classroom tell me what I already knew? “We can only score based on what we see in the snapshot of time we are in your room.”

Of course, the safeguard for that was supposed to be the incredibly detailed lesson plans I must have posted outside my door each morning. God help you if an unexpected change causes you to do something that isn’t specifically outlined in that plan either. So, why was it that when I pointed out while the administrator did not observe this particular component during his segment of time in my room, the detailed information was provided in the lesson plan that I had to write to ensure my marks were not lowered due to lack of observance? I have a suspicion that the administrator felt a little defensive, like I might be suggesting he wasn’t doing his job thoroughly. WELCOME TO MY WORLD, BUDDY.

Now, an “outsider” to the education world may think, “Maybe the problem is you. Maybe you really deserve those marks.” To be realistic for a second, teachers talk. And talk. And talk. We are surviving these trenches together. So, when something like that happens we start investigating as to if this is a personal issue or yet another blanket injustice. Every teacher on that hallway that I spoke to about this matter also received at least a 2 in one category on that same evaluation round, most of which had never received anything lower than a 3 before. Sorry, the common denominator here is not me.

How would you feel if you had always dedicated yourself to doing the best you could possibly do, have superiors recognize that fact, only to have some mystical state level person dictate your score and they probably have never even driven through your county, let alone sat in a classroom under the same expectations as you are right now?

Seriously, you’d be angry and offended. And don’t even get me started on how the evaluation scores will directly impact the amount of money I receive on my monthly paycheck.

What you wouldn’t feel is motivated. Why bother? Here’s another great non-educator response to this dilemma: “You do it for the kids, of course!” Those people clearly have no idea what they are talking about. The evaluation system is so far removed from what is best for kids that it’s disgusting.

I don’t write my standards and essential questions on the board each day and then redundantly type them on my lesson plan, and then ensure every child hears me mention them at least twice during the period because it’s best for them. They will have disposed of that information by the time they walk into the next class period and I know that.

I do it because I am told I have to and it will be evaluated.

I don’t sit down to look at the scores of every single student I teach on every assignment I give, then use those numbers to justify my reasoning for deciding on the next task and then ensure that I write a detailed narrative component on my lesson plan and mention it during collaborative planning and log that information as well to prove the decision I made about next week’s lessons is data based because that’s best for my kids. I could have looked at my gradebook and known the same— but if you don’t document it, it didn’t happen.

I do it because I am told I have to and it will be evaluated.

In fact, what I consistently don’t get to do, is exactly what I know to be best for my students.

I DON’T get to sit down and listen to them cry about how their parents are getting divorced because of an affair, and now they have to choose who to live with. If I did, I wouldn’t be “using instructional time wisely.”

I DON’T get to allow a girl, who is leaving for a week to go to China to meet her new adopted sister, to complete an alternative authentic writing assignment because it doesn’t align with the county required prompt that they use to analyze district-wide data.

I DON’T get to use teachable moments to impress upon the students the importance of honesty, integrity, work ethic, kindness, or any other ideals that are “not in the standards.”

When children are no longer viewed as children, but rather a number, a piece of data, a risk factor for my student growth model based on the state test, children are no longer the reason education exists. Education should not be a business, nor a competition, nor a data mine, nor an overall dehumanized semblance of infrastructure. It’s supposed to be a place where mistakes lead to growth, where children discover themselves and their talents, where practice makes perfect, where character development is critical. These are things you will not see in a public education facility anymore. These are things that have no value in the state’s eyes. These are things that drive quality teachers out of this field with hurricane-like force, and I am just not willing to board up the windows and ride this one out, because it’s like I’m saying I support these practices as best for children. Educators should not be attached to that abysmal lie.

 

 

 

Reader Comments 0

113 comments
RSJII
RSJII

I've already had a student ask quite loudly in class "Why are they making you all do this stuff? You can't help it if we don't want to learn it." The stuff was in reference to us being engaging, providing rigor, trying different teaching methods/styles, and providing differentiated instruction for each child. 


RSJII
RSJII

What she said is what I'm facing now.

Veteran Teacher
Veteran Teacher

 I have put 29 years into teaching in public secondary schools.  I can honestly say that I love the work of teaching my subject matter and interacting with the students.  But the politics here in Georgia are definitely inimical to the teaching and learning process.


For roughly half of my career, the academic year has been smooth sailing.  For the other half, politics or administrators who lack knowledge of my field or who have hidden (or not-so-hidden) agendae have ended up making me (and others) rather miserable.  With few exceptions, I generally have gotten along well with such people and have received great evaluations,  but the stress has taken a real psychological and physical toll on me.


I am very fortunate to be working in a school with a fantastic administration--well-educated, open-minded, sensible individuals who listen and who can see the whole picture.  I definitely thrive in this situation.  I also view the evaluation criteria for classroom performance as quite valid--as long as the instrument is in the hands of a competent and fair evaluator. ( I have been lucky so far in that regard.  Others have not.)


Nonetheless, we all agree, for a number of reasons,  that the standardized tests should not be a part of this system.  First, the tests are often not valid and sometimes are even loaded with errors.  (I can say this because I had to write one of them, with very little time to prepare and few materials from which to draw--and my product should never have been used to evaluate a teacher!)  Second, more than a few very bright students either don't care how they do on the tests and provide random answers, or they think outside the box and quite logically come up with answers that do not match those of the test maker.  Third, many students do not learn because they do not care to learn, and no one is forcing them to do so. Fourth,  many classroom teachers face conditions in their classrooms that actually inhibit learning, such as overcrowding,  lack of materials, etc.  


So far, my students have managed to perform well on the standardized tests.  But now I have a group of students who have arrived without the cognitive skills they need in order to tackle the usual material (possibly because of overemphasis on standardized testing), and so I have had to help them develop those skills and am moving very slowly through instruction. I shudder to think what their performance on the standardized test will cause people to infer about me as a teacher.


There are other things I could have done as a career, and still would like to do.  However, I need to get full retirement first, as I have no other means of support.  Even then, I will need to continue to work at least part-time in order to make ends meet, since we are not a union state and are not as well heeled, either before or after retirement, as some people seem to think we are.  


Over the past couple of years, I have become disgusted with the disrespect and the lack of appreciation on the part of many students, some parents, and, definitely, the politicians of this state.  A very high percentage of "high-performing" students have cheated their way through the system and have even found a way to do so on standardized tests.  All their parents care about is that they make only A's so that they can get college scholarships;  character means nothing anymore.  And, heaven forbid that a child doesn't come off as perfect on a college application!  Parents constantly put pressure on teachers and administrators to change their children's grades, too. I am fortunate to work under administrators who do not cave to that type of pressure, and I am sure they have endured quite a lot of it. 


What I see is a system that enables students not to work hard and then blames teachers when those students don't do well.  Common sense should tell us that education will improve only when Junior is held accountable for his own learning.  Of course, Junior hopes people will ignore that fact. Unfortunately,  politicians also don't seem to want that message to spread;  either they need a scapegoat and the teacher is a convenient one, or they need a platform, something to gripe about, and education is the handiest issue.  Meanwhile, Junior is happy to sit around and pit his teachers and his parents against each other.  


I have never been a fan of powerful unions, as I know they also can wield undue influence in some ways.  However, I am convinced that our professional organizations need more power than they have. These invalid performance measures should never have been implemented in the first place and might not have been if we teachers had been heard.  And bear in mind that what is detrimental to teachers also is detrimental to students, because it inhibits the learning process.  


Some of us would like to see interest-based bargaining, not collective bargaining.  The upshot is that we want fair treatment, respect, and conditions that allow us to do our jobs well, as well as decent pay.  There are some bad apples out there,  but most of us take pride in doing the best we can for Georgia's children. Please don't make us sorry that we went into teaching;  just watching what is happening to us has been enough to turn off some of our really good future prospects. 

Veteran Teacher
Veteran Teacher

I have put 29 years into teaching in public secondary schools.  I can honestly say that I love the work of teaching my subject matter and interacting with the students.  But the politics here in Georgia are definitely inimical to the teaching and learning process.


For roughly half of my career, the academic year has been smooth sailing.  For the other half, politics or administrators who lack knowledge of my field or who have hidden (or not-so-hidden) agendae have ended up making me (and others) rather miserable.  With few exceptions, I generally have gotten along well with such people and have received great evaluations,  but the stress has taken a real psychological and physical toll on me.


I am very fortunate to be working in a school with a fantastic administration--well-educated, open-minded, sensible individuals who listen and who can see the whole picture.  I definitely thrive in this situation.  I also view the evaluation criteria for classroom performance as quite valid--as long as the instrument is in the hands of a competent and fair evaluator. ( I have been lucky so far in that regard.  Others have not.)


Nonetheless, we all agree, for a number of reasons,  that the standardized tests should not be a part of this system.  First, the tests are often not valid and sometimes are even loaded with errors.  (I can say this because I had to write one of them, with very little time to prepare and few materials from which to draw--and my product should never have been used to evaluate a teacher!)  Second, more than a few very bright students either don't care how they do on the tests and provide random answers, or they think outside the box and quite logically come up with answers that do not match those of the test maker.  Third, many students do not learn because they do not care to learn, and no one is forcing them to do so. Fourth,  many classroom teachers face conditions in their classrooms that actually inhibit learning, such as overcrowding,  lack of materials, etc.  


So far, my students have managed to perform well on the standardized tests.  But now I have a group of students who have arrived without the cognitive skills they need in order to tackle the usual material (possibly because of overemphasis on standardized testing), and so I have had to help them develop those skills and am moving very slowly through instruction. I shudder to think what their performance on the standardized test will cause people to infer about me as a teacher.


There are other things I could have done as a career, and still would like to do.  However, I need to get full retirement first, as I have no other means of support.  Even then, I will need to continue to work at least part-time in order to make ends meet, since we are not a union state and are not as well heeled, either before or after retirement, as some people seem to think we are.  


Over the past couple of years, I have become disgusted with the disrespect and the lack of appreciation on the part of many students, some parents, and, definitely, the politicians of this state.  A very high percentage of "high-performing" students have cheated their way through the system and have even found a way to do so on standardized tests.  All their parents care about is that they make only A's so that they can get college scholarships;  character means nothing anymore.  And, heaven forbid that a child doesn't come off as perfect on a college application!  Parents constantly put pressure on teachers and administrators to change their children's grades, too. I am fortunate to work under administrators who do not cave to that type of pressure, and I am sure they have endured quite a lot of it. 


What I see is a system that enables students not to work hard and then blames teachers when those students don't do well.  Common sense should tell us that education will improve only when Junior is held accountable for his own learning.  Of course, Junior hopes people will ignore that fact. Unfortunately,  politicians also don't seem to want that message to spread;  either they need a scapegoat and the teacher is a convenient one, or they need a platform, something to gripe about, and education is the handiest issue.  Meanwhile, Junior is happy to sit around and pit his teachers and his parents against each other.  


I have never been a fan of powerful unions, as I know they also can wield undue influence in some ways.  However, I am convinced that our professional organizations need more power than they have. These invalid performance measures should never have been implemented in the first place and might not have been if we teachers had been heard.  And bear in mind that what is detrimental to teachers also is detrimental to students, because it inhibits the learning process.  


Some of us would like to see interest-based bargaining, not collective bargaining.  The upshot is that we want fair treatment, respect, and conditions that allow us to do our jobs well, as well as decent pay.  There are some bad apples out there,  but most of us take pride in doing the best we can for Georgia's children. Please don't make us sorry that we went into teaching;  just watching what is happening to us has been enough to turn off some of our really good future prospects. 


MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

"Education should not be a business, nor a competition, nor a data mine, nor an overall dehumanized semblance of infrastructure. It’s supposed to be a place where mistakes lead to growth, where children discover themselves and their talents, where practice makes perfect, where character development is critical."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


I have been stating this for years.  Kudos to this teacher for saying it with passion.  She is correct. 


 I have my eye and my hope for public education, which is both excellent in delivery and humane in purpose, on the DeKalb County School System, under the direction of Dr. Steve Green, Superintendent of Schools.  I will NEVER give up on public education.  Public education is the last hope for our great nation, which has become filled with greed and self-serving interests, and where success has become equated to profits made for one's self, alone, in business endeavors, especially under the rigid and dogmatic Republican ideology of the past 30 years.


CSpinks
CSpinks

@MaryElizabethSings In the corner of Georgia where I live, "greed and self-serving interests" have already infiltrated the largest public school system.

Travelfish
Travelfish

Few people enjoy having their work product evaluated. And every occupation has its quota of malcontents who stubbornly refuse to move on to jobs they're better suited for.

But in what other occupation do whiners get a dedicated newspaper column?

CSpinks
CSpinks

@AvgGeorgian @Travelfish That GA students "do not have to work(learn)" is a condemnation of us as teachers. Why haven't we shouted out this lamentable fact from north Georgia's highest mountains and fought in The Golden Dome to put an end to self-serving educrats' triumph in the graduation of kids ill-prepared to perform as citizens, parents and workers.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@cmcbrooks @Travelfish Might I persuade you to join with other retired teachers in helping our practicing colleagues by impacting those factors outside the schoolhouse which affect student performance with in it?

cmcbrooks
cmcbrooks

@Travelfish Teachers have been evaluated for the entire time (over 30 years) that I have been in the field. The problem now is that too much of the evaluation is based upon student performance which is impacted by many factors outside of the teacher's control. Most professionals want feedback and desire to grow. Teachers cannot control a child's home environment and the many factors outside of the school day that directly influence a student's performance on one test during the year. There is already a shortage of teachers and it will only get worse if things are not done to make it more appealing. I don't think sharing these concerns qualifies as whining. I recently retired but am very concerned about motivating dedicated young people to enter the field of education. 

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Travelfish


You are confused. A teacher's work product is not the students' test scores.


No sane system makes managers(teachers) accountable for the precision, productivity and efficiency for a group of workers(students) who:

1. are not screened

2. do not have to work

3. do not have to come to work

4. cannot be fired



MCarr984
MCarr984

We're also getting a first hand look here in Atlanta of what running a government like a business looks like. Just with what's going on with our public schools.

When a large corporation has a division that is under-performing, they close it or sell it off. With the Atlanta Public School System, grades now count for everything, so the schools that are the worst of a pretty crummy system are spun off as Charter Schools! Get rid of the lowest scores and the whole system looks better.

 Oh, and of course, adding in a profit margin will certainly mean that more money will be spent for the best teachers and equipment. Classrooms will be fully stocked with needed supplies and students will be taught real-world digital skills on the newest up-to-date devices and systems.

 (That last paragraph was sarcasm in case any of you readers are part of the school system administration)

Ken430TX
Ken430TX

Not very different than when I left teaching for similar reasons in 1980 after 5 years in the classroom.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@Ken430TX I don't recall when Bill Shipp coined the term "excuse-based education" to describe GaPubEd. But the term has described our state's public school system for most of the forty-five-year period during which I have observed it.


The damage caused to our excuse-based system by the emigration of highly-able and -motivated parents who've elected to send their kids to "no excuses" private schools is incalculable.

stevenmia
stevenmia

1) Tell me if I am wrong but the Atlanta area and Georgia invests about 10K per student while some states invest 20K per student. Check the student load and results.  Do a story on that.      

2) If parents are not partners in their children's lives then we are really screwed as a nation in so many ways.      Parents must be encouraged and provided time to participate.    I say extend tax credits for good parenting not just for Pre K.     Yes, this requires government, but it puts responsibility where it belongs.

Another comment
Another comment

Most areas of the country are made up of single high school size districts, that lack these heavy central office paper pushers.

Then look most of the law makers send their children to Private schools such a Westminster, Lovett, Pace, Walker, and Woodward that all charge $25-26k plus for carefully selected students. Parents or the paid surrogate parents are required to participate by volunteering, fundraising and additional donations. Woodward where Sen. Isacksons children attend ( driven by the Nanny ) is the largest k-12 in the country and still only has 2,500 students.

Those of us who went to school in the states that fund their schools in the $20k amount plus, will tell you it is night and day.

stevenmia
stevenmia

I have two rentals with children in them. Over the years families move in an out.   I have had children raising children and adults raising children or so they think.    No matter the age of the parents there is equal opportunity for terrible parenting.    I say cut off rental  assistance and tax deductions to parents of failing students.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@stevenmia Should we cut off mortgage deductions and IRA deductions for wealthy parents whose children fail?

Another comment
Another comment

Then you would be screaming that you weren't getting those section 8 checks!

Casey Brazell
Casey Brazell

This is horrible! What has this country come to, there has to be a way for the citizens of this country to change this!!! I am so sorry for what you have gone through, and for how we are failing our children by losing our humanity!

GeorgiaJanet
GeorgiaJanet

Sad. The ignorance surrounding what really goes on in public schools is stunning. Yes, there are bad teachers out there, but the acrobatics administrators must go through to get rid of them is as bad as the ones teachers must perform to meet accountability. We are throwing the baby out with the bath water when unreasonable demands are placed on those good teachers who do what is in the best interest of the student. If walls could talk, outsiders would be appalled...http://www.georgiajanet.com/if-these-walls-could-talk/

OdessaHooker
OdessaHooker

Teaching gets more difficult with time. Even though I a no longer employed as an educator, my greatest thrill is working with children. And, I'm eternally grateful for the education of my own children.

stevenmia
stevenmia

  1. I give up .......I can't unfinisg typing as the paragraphs are locked....l

In 1969 I was certified to teach all business subjects in HS except short hand....Anyone remember that?   I taught community college for two years and worked for a couple of small businesses before I started my own small business where I really got to practice all I had studied.   Early on I knew the class room was starting to get tough, not just for the various problems a teacher has to deal with but I found a teacher had to be a CBS special all the time as students wanted to be entertained.   Even though I love theater, I was not into daily entertaining.        After reading this story, I can't imagine how any great teacher could stomach the burdensome documentation paperwork.   

 just moved to Atlanta as was thinking about signing up to substitute even given the dreadful pay.    May still do just to learn first hand what has happened in 50 years.       I did substitute My teachers lesson plans were for basically hand writtend on consisted of a big monlty     

person haaall the  I often wonder how I would have done in teaching.    After reading this article, my wonder has goe away.     

s justxn got a dregee to Oh g

Another comment
Another comment

I feel your pain, the website did the same thing to my post yesterday morning. It locks up doesn't type and then you redo. It appears that it doesn't post. It ends up making us posters look ignorant or drunk.

Thanks for making the comment. I thought it was my IPad and now you clarified it is this horrible pay site.

dg417s
dg417s

I wonder how college professors are doing with the generation of NCLB students? College is all about thinking - something our students don't have to do now under the era of high-stakes testing. Take the teacher accountability piece out of the discussion for the time being (I've made a suggestion multiple times on previous blogs on how to measure teacher effectiveness outside of standardized testing) and look at what is coming for our future if we don't have people willing to question the system and to make changes, and, most importantly, to think outside of the box. 


https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/78/d1/fc/78d1fcf6ecfcee5c0c055d261d9d22e7.jpg

Another comment
Another comment

They are flunking them, and or catching them cheating. I have written several times on this board that last semester a Ga State Nursing Professor discovered a cheating scheme aka ring on tests. A female student, a veteran went to her office to confront her about the academic integrity issue and the grades more accurately displayed. The nursing professor was beaten up, aka Felony assault and Battery. Put the professor in the hospital.

I have a strong feeling that this Professor and or the administrative chain at Georgia State have gotten this story to Deal. I know someone who has been firsthand told of this assault by the Professor.

Remember that nurses and doctors don't have to teach in Nursing and Medical school Programs, Just like Architects and Engineers, most have private practices or regular day jobs. You can not go to adjunct faculty and then not expect the adjuncts to have full time gigs. These folks teaching the hard to fill programs will be the first to go with Campus Carry. They teach for pleasure not $2,200 a course or what ever the measley pay I was told at a Xmas party.

ptcrunner
ptcrunner

It has been all about teaching to the test in the name of "accountability" which has intensified since the days of "No Child Left Behind." Of course, the right was pretty much mute on NCLB, but then became irate with "Common Core." How about throwing out the idea of tests and "accountability" and try to get students to become original thinkers. Stop treating the kids like cattle by painting them with a wide brush. Actually, this is an issue that can 'wrap around the ideological spectrum' to get liberals and conservatives on the same page, but too many are shallow to make that happen for the good of the nation. Those on the right wish to treat education like a business and complain about those so-called 'evil teacher unions' and some on the left wish to hand out trophies for kids just showing up to class. 

smyrnasensei
smyrnasensei

I understand very well what is presented here. We should move to formats required in many other countries where administration must also be in the classroom as a teacher every day for part of the day. Perhaps county and state level persons should be required to teach in a classroom of children - not adults - once per week. Then reality of the needs of students would be foremost and requirements would be realistic.

WDGurley
WDGurley

It's all been messed up by the politicians and the consultants.  The curriculum's, teacher evaluation processes and incentives for teachers are all wrong.

rbajc
rbajc

I had a student projectile vomit all over his desk, the floor, the "smartboard" and two other students.  The smell was horrendous.  When I called the office for permission to take my 7th grade class out of the classroom so it could be cleaned, I was told "I should not lose instruction time over trivial things like this".  School administration, from the school to the state level, have removed themselves so far from the reality of teaching and learning it is pathetic.  Learning takes place when a teacher teaches and a student is willing to learn.  It is not rocket science.  Learning is down in our classrooms because the teacher is too busy doing administrivia that has nothing to do with reality.

macfalfan
macfalfan

@rbajc I haven't taught in nearly 20 years but I could just take my kids out anytime- just call janitor to clean the room. Also  if I wanted to sit outside and read we could do that. And I could discipline my students. I would have taken the kids out and said FIRE ME- and I bet parents would have backed you!

Travelfish
Travelfish

According to this newspaper column, all teachers have either quit in disgust or are thinking of quitting. 

And yet, the same teachers staff your local school year after year, with long lines of applicants greeting every teaching vacancy. Who among us doesn't know someone with an application pending?

Thus exposing all the legislative season hyperbole for what it is.

Quidocetdiscit
Quidocetdiscit

@Wascatlady @Travelfish


Travelsfish, 


What we seem to have in my school and many others is a growing loss of those mid- level  teachers - the ones who have taught between around five years and 15 years.  We have new teachers, who are just entering the field and have not yet suffered/burned out under the new "accountability micromanagement" system, and older teachers who are too far invested in the system to just up and quit with the vague hope to starting a new career at age 48+.  So yes, you will see the long lines of NEW applicants, and the same faces who have been there forever.  What you will not see, is many of the the mid-tier who will take over when the veteran teachers leave.  This leaves schools in sad shape when all the veterans are gone and there is no one left to mentor the newbies.  


I suppose some of you will crow "good riddance", thinking that with all the "nay sayers"gone, the new fresh blood will be able to work miracles, but that is not the reality of what will happen.  What will happen, is that you will lose the teachers who remember what is was like to really TEACH and not just "cover information" and you will lose the wisdom and experience they have passed on from one generation of teachers to the next.  A strong school needs a balance of teachers from various points in their career, and what we are beginning to see does not bode well for the future of our children' education.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Travelfish Ask any business-number of applicants does not equal number of productive workers. Do you know nothing of how hiring works in the real world?

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Travelfish Who of us doesn't know 3-5 teachers who quit after less than 5 years in the classroom?

readcritic
readcritic

@Wascatlady @Travelfish And those Teach for America educators also run screaming. They had no idea how unrealistic the public school classrooms have become due to micromanagement from everyone but the teacher.

SmokinDawg
SmokinDawg

God bless the dedicated teachers of this country. I don't know why anyone would do this job anymore, but this is a prime example of what life is like under government control - miserable, aimless and soul-crushing.



goat diddler
goat diddler

Being a former "troubled" student, I can safely say that in today's public education I would not succeed. It took a couple counselors and teachers at my alternative school, who saw something in me I didn't even know was there, but they believed and eventually, so did I.

This wouldn't be possible in today's public schools.

MauryL
MauryL

public education in this state is embarrassing---low salaries, too much testing, poorly designed evaluations---i'm tired of this. I may move back to jersey next year if I can find a job---they have much better schools and pay teachers a lot more money with strong unions!

rbajc
rbajc

@SmokinDawg @MaxMose You must have gone to school in Georgia.  At least be original..that saying is pretty used up.

Another comment
Another comment

Atlanta's economy would be completely in the toilet if all of us damn Yankees had not moved here. Many of us, especially those who have made the Northern swaths of Sandy Springs, East Cobb, JohnsCreek, Milton, and then down in Peachtree city have been brought in by our employers or recruited as Best and Brightest. Yes, Atlanta companies go to Midwest, mid Atlantic and Northeast college campuses and recruit us. Look at who IBM, UPS and others have moved down with them.

concernedoldtimer
concernedoldtimer

Actually, salaries better than in nearby states....taught in another and mad $27,000 less a year and way worse benefits. The salaries just have not gone up much due to top heavy admin costs.