Gov. Deal announces a 90-member Teacher Advisory Committee

The governor announced a Teacher Advisory Committee today made up of 90 teachers from three geographic regions of the state, north, metro and central/south.

One committee member recently wrote for the Get Schooled blog in support of using test scores in teacher evaluations, something Gov. Nathan Deal favors. Deal also has nine teachers from charter schools on the committee.

The governor has ensured his educational priorities and preferences will be represented on the committee, but there are certainly a lot of voices to be heard with 90 teachers. So, I am hoping this committee will not be an echo chamber but a diverse collection of teachers with a range of views.

I am not sure 90 people is a committee; it seems closer to a conference. But we’ll see how it goes.

Gov. Nathan Deal

Gov. Nathan Deal

From the Governor’s Office today:

Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the creation of the Teacher Advisory Committee, which will review recommendations from the 2015 Education Reform Commission in order to provide feedback and guidance to Deal, legislators and policy-makers.

The committee is chaired by Rep. Amy Carter, a practicing teacher in Lowndes County, and is composed of 90 educators throughout the state. These teachers have experience from kindergarten through high school across a wide range of subject areas including STEM fields, fine arts and special and gifted education. Deal announced his intention to create the Teacher Advisory Committee earlier this year.

“Last year, I charged the Education Reform Commission with studying the state’s education system and making recommendations on how it can more effectively prepare our students for postsecondary programs and the workforce,” said Deal. “The responsibility of the commission was to think beyond the confines of the current system, look into the future and recommend changes that will make that level of educational preparation possible in Georgia. They fulfilled that responsibility and I’m grateful for their hard work and diligent efforts. Now I would like to hear from those on the front lines.

“Georgia’s teachers educate, train, mentor and encourage our children each and every day, and they are dedicated to providing a quality education and shaping the minds of Georgia’s future leaders. I have tasked the Teacher Advisory Committee with reviewing these recommendations and providing input and feedback. Their experience in the classroom will help guide our efforts as we seek to improve educational outcomes for students, retain the best and brightest teachers and address critical needs in Georgia’s K-12 system. I look forward to meeting with them to discuss how we can continue to improve outcomes for Georgia’s educators.”

The Teacher Advisory Committee will participate in meetings, conference calls and webinars throughout the summer and early fall and provide feedback following each discussion. Dr. Susan Andrews, Director of Special Projects for the Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget, will facilitate these discussions.

A complete list of committee members by region can be found below:

North Georgia Region

Metro Georgia Region

Central/South Georgia Region

Several of you have asked how these teachers were chosen. I asked and received this email from Dr. Susan Andrews of the Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget:

The Governor’s Office solicited recommendations of teachers from the directors of each Regional Education Service Agency (RESA), Superintendents, legislators, and other educational leaders throughout the State. For each recommendation, we asked for years of experience, grade level, and subject taught. We asked for teachers who were considered innovative in their approach to teaching and those who were reform-minded, staying current on new ideas and research.

After receiving the input, the participants were selected from the recommendations, taking care to choose teachers from each grade level and content area. We were deliberate about having academic content area teachers, career technical teachers, teachers of English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL),a foreign language teacher, teachers of gifted students, and teachers of students with disabilities. We also wanted teachers with varying levels of experience so the group has teachers with as few as 2 years of experience up to more than 30 years. We also ensured there were teachers from each region of Georgia.  We are confident that the group represents the teaching profession in Georgia.

 

 

Reader Comments 0

19 comments
Wascatlady
Wascatlady

Can someone check on the bona fides of "the chosen?"  I know the young woman from my area has a whopping 9 years (or maybe 8) in the classroom.  Are they mostly inexperienced and malleable?


And yes, nine years IS inexperienced.


I also note only 6 are male from N. Ga region.  Men are frequently more difficult to run over than women.

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@AvgGeorgian Several of you have asked how these teachers were chosen. I asked and received this email from Dr. Susan Andrews of  the Governor's Office of Planning and Budget:

The Governor's Office solicited recommendations of teachers from the directors of each Regional Education Service Agency (RESA), Superintendents, legislators, and other educational leaders throughout the State. For each recommendation, we asked for years of experience, grade level, and subject taught. We asked for teachers who were considered innovative in their approach to teaching and those who were reform-minded, staying current on new ideas and research. 

After receiving the input, the participants were selected from the recommendations, taking care to choose teachers from each grade level and content area. We were deliberate about having academic content area teachers, career technical teachers, teachers of English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL),a foreign language teacher, teachers of gifted students, and teachers of students with disabilities. We also wanted teachers with varying levels of experience so the group has teachers with as few as 2 years of experience up to more than 30 years. We also ensured there were teachers from each region of Georgia.  We are confident that the group represents the teaching profession in Georgia.


AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@MaureenDowney @AvgGeorgian


"After receiving the input, the participants were selected from the recommendations" Who selected the participants?


According to the vague scheme described above, all of the participants could have been chosen by legislators (1, 2 , more?) that were handpicked by the Governor. If it walks like a sham....

Traci Lawson McBride
Traci Lawson McBride

Just wondering why the Superintendent's Teacher Advisory Council wasn't considered for this task?

Amy Blafer
Amy Blafer

Both Cobb and Fulton are represented by elementary school teachers? Seriously? How were these people selected?

AJC  Get Schooled
AJC Get Schooled

I asked that question and received this answer from Dr. Susan Andrews of the Governor's Office of Planning and Budget: The Governor’s Office solicited recommendations of teachers from the directors of each Regional Education Service Agency (RESA), Superintendents, legislators, and other educational leaders throughout the State. For each recommendation, we asked for years of experience, grade level, and subject taught. We asked for teachers who were considered innovative in their approach to teaching and those who were reform-minded, staying current on new ideas and research. After receiving the input, the participants were selected from the recommendations, taking care to choose teachers from each grade level and content area. We were deliberate about having academic content area teachers, career technical teachers, teachers of English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL),a foreign language teacher, teachers of gifted students, and teachers of students with disabilities. We also wanted teachers with varying levels of experience so the group has teachers with as few as 2 years of experience up to more than 30 years. We also ensured there were teachers from each region of Georgia. We are confident that the group represents the teaching profession in Georgia.

PPair
PPair

I would have liked to have seen more high school teachers from our top performing schools -Metro has a lot of them and they are underrepresented here. Is there even a high school teacher from Fulton?

dcdcdc
dcdcdc

As long as one of the recommendations is to financially reward our best teachers, then this committee will have accomplished something that could actually positively change our school system.


Conversely, if they push to keep the same socialistic "everyone gets paid the same to be fair" approach, then we will continue our slide into and below mediocrity.


Sadly, I suspect the latter is more likely.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@dcdcdc What planet do you live on where the "best in a group of workers at the same level get paid more?


Do you really think teachers do something to a student that makes them much smarter?


Please show us some persuasive evidence that teachers' actions cause meaningful performance improvements in students, whether or not the student is motivated to perform.


Scotdawg2
Scotdawg2

Several sources annual rank "best schools" in Georgia.  How are these represented on the committee?

newsphile
newsphile

How I wish this was a genuine effort on Deal's part to take an unbiased look at great things happening in some public school districts and replicate those in "failing" schools.  However, seeing how the committee is staffed, I believe it's just another platform in which to promote and gather support for OSD.  Good schools are, for the most part, absent from the list.  We've all read about Cherokee Charter's out of state management company, its troubles, and its campaign contributions to Deal, yet it occupies a seat at the table.  Wonder why.  Wouldn't anyone want to get input from schools that make the trusted lists of good schools? 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

"The governor has ensured his educational priorities and preferences will be represented on the committee, but there are certainly a lot of voices to be heard with 90 teachers. So, I am hoping this committee will not be an echo chamber but a diverse collection of teachers with a range of view."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


I second your above thoughts, Maureen, and I compliment Governor Deal for including the voices of  so many teachers on the educational committee.

Connie Roehs Jackson
Connie Roehs Jackson

Interesting to see if it is anything other than a sham for him to look like he values teacher opinions.

trifecta_
trifecta_

I'm glad to see our Governor expanding his interest in education issues. 

Hopefully the Opportunity School District will soon be joined by other inspired initiatives that likewise promise to better our public schools.


Vera Wynn
Vera Wynn

Really that's a little late and nothing is suppose to get done.He want teacher's advice when he b is on his last term really