Massive charter school theft sounds warning for Georgia’s charter schools

Kathleen Mathers (center), Latin Academy board member, speaks during a meeting earlier this year. HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM

By Molly Bloom

How do you not notice $600,000 is missing?

That’s what parents and staff at Atlanta’s Latin Academy Charter School asked as the extent of the theft from their school — the largest theft in Georgia charter school history — was revealed.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports:

A $12,000 charge at a strip club. Thousands of dollars spent at Mercedes-Benz of Buckhead. ATM withdrawals of hundreds of dollars at a time.

The charges to Atlanta’s Latin Academy Charter School should have raised eyebrows. For the top state education officials and corporate executives on the school’s board, they should have set off earsplitting sirens.

Instead, the charges continued for years, siphoning more than $600,000 in taxpayer dollars that should have been spent on students.

Christopher Clemons, the school’s founder, has been charged with fraud and theft in connection with the missing money.

Academically, Latin Academy was one of the top-performing middle schools in Atlanta. But the AJC found little evidence that the school’s all-star board scrutinized the school’s finances with the same attention they devoted to tracking its academic performance.

The result is “a cautionary tale for Georgia’s growing charter school movement:”

Latin Academy, with its all-star board and experienced leader, seemed on track to thrive. But behind that facade of apparent success, the school spent millions of tax dollars with little public scrutiny and operated with a lack of public input foreign to many traditional public schools.

The board’s chairman, Kaseem Ladipo, told the AJC the board’s finance committee met monthly with Clemons and the school’s operations director, but were shown doctored financial statements.

It’s hard to tell if that’s true:

The board declined to provide copies of board financial presentations in response to a Georgia Open Records Act request, saying releasing the records would hamper their investigation of possible employee wrongdoing. The board also rejected Open Records Act requests for the financial audit the school board paid for.

And more recently, the board has ignored Open Records Act requests for copies of a settlement agreement with a loan company in connection with a $600,000 loan Clemons took out on the school’s behalf, possibly once again spending thousands more taxpayer dollars with little public scrutiny.

This case is getting national attention with charter school critics contending it illustrates the lack of oversight of charters. Latin Academy had impressive leadership. The school’s appointed governing board came to include Kathleen Mathers, who had served as head of the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement and led a state investigation into cheating in Atlanta schools, and Eric Wearne, previously deputy director at the same agency. The board included MBAs like Coca-Cola executive Scott Harrison as treasurer, and Ladipo, who is head of the local arm of national education nonprofit Horizons. It also included LaNiesha Cobb, a vice president with Teach for America, corporate attorney Veronica Davis and Jamal Booker, a manager at Coca-Cola.

It would be a challenge to get a more notable board and yet $600,000 was misspent in seemingly blatant ways. Are there fatal flaws in charter school oversight in Georgia?

Reader Comments 0

117 comments
bu22
bu22

Sounds like Charter schools have to be aware of crooks just like public schools.  Beverly Hall at APS, Crawford Lewis at DCSS....

eulb
eulb

Just stumbled over this: http://tinyurl.com/ProvostOhio  
It's about an Ohio online charter school.  Ohio is demanding that the school return a large chunk of money to the state because it found the number of students who were actually participating in the program often enough to be considered real students was much lower than the school's headcount.  In other words, the state paid the school for a whole lot of imaginary students.  The school has to refund the money to the state, but that seems to be the only consequence. This is the only instance I've turned up where the concept of "I want my money back" seems to have some traction for wrongdoing within a charter school.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

A little context would be nice.  $600k over how many years and in contrast to the annual budget would be a good place to start.

Most governing boards of any organization usually only see summary level financial information.  It is very easy to hide money - especially when the access to the accounting records is closely held by 3-4 individuals.  You see this same scenario in many organizations where trust is substituted for good internal financial controls.  Churches are a prime example.

This also points out the need for ALL public entities to post their accounting records, including checkbook register, expense statements, and general ledger, online for public viewing.

I would also be interested in seeing the audit report as well as the name of the accounting firm who performed the audit.  Sounds like a friends and family scenario.

Finally, SOMEONE in this organization knew about the spending.  Why they remained silent is a question the board needs to find out.  According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, a hotline is the #1 way most fraud is detected in organizations - by a multiple of 2-3 times the next method which is an internal audit.

eulb
eulb

@Lee_CPA2 

Lee, Here's some context.  Atlanta's Latin Academy opened in the fall of 2012.  In the summer of 2015, shortly after replacing Clemons, the money was discovered missing.  As far as the annual budget -- I'd like to see it.  If it's available to the public, I haven't been able to find it. 

Chris Clemons had a hand in other charter schools in the area, too.  Fulton County's Latin Grammar School and Latin College Prep School in East Point are both missing large amounts of money, apparently withdrawn by Clemons.  Here's a link: http://tinyurl.com/Fulton-Clemons

gactzn2
gactzn2

@Lee_CPA2 Frequent financial review by outside accounting services for the school district should be par the course for these governing boards. Just like they retain school attorneys.  Let's just face it, many members on these board lack the skills to be able to catch crooks who cook the books.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@Wascatlady @Lee_CPA2

I agree, $600k is a big deal.  The point I was trying to make is that the premise of this article and of several of the bloggers was that the board should have caught it.  All I'm trying to say is that $60k per year over ten years with a $25 million budget is a lot easier to hide than $300k over two years with a $5 million budget.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@eulb @Lee_CPA2

Thanks for that info.  

Yeah, it's looking more and more as though someone was asleep at the wheel at the board.

Lee_CPA2
Lee_CPA2

@gactzn2 @Lee_CPA2

Even reviews by outside accountants are no guarantee of catching this type of fraud.  Oftentimes, small companies and entities such as this school hire local CPA firms who are good with taxes and basic bookkeeping, but do not have the experience or  forensic accounting training to ferret out fraud such as occurred here.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

We really don't know if all charter schools have this problem or not because they have no financial accountability to the taxpayer as do public schools.They hide their salry data and their payments to vendors.

In this case, it took the theft of enough money to cause school closure for it to come to light. Thousands of dollars were spent on strippers and the clueless board didn't care or lacked the intelligence/skills to oversee a single small school.


This is the future of the OSD. Public money - no accountability.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@AvgGeorgian The members did NOT lack the intelligence or skills.  They are a premier group.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Wascatlady @AvgGeorgian


My point is that maybe they are "premier" based on their connections rather than their proven worth. As a matter of fact, they have proven their worth when it comes to overseeing a budget.

EdJohnson
EdJohnson

Washington State Supreme Court ruled “charter schools are not ‘common schools’ (or public schools) because they’re governed by appointed rather than elected boards” … and “money that is dedicated to common schools is unconstitutionally diverted to charter schools.”

It’s amazing anyone would promote maintaining the status quo by spouting the “charter schools are public schools” ideology.

eulb
eulb

@EdJohnson 

I was unaware of what was going on in Wash State until you pointed this out.  Their legislature recently enacted an amendment to try to get around the Wash Supreme Court's ruling. 

The new amendment made some changes in the way Wash State charters are funded but did not change the fact that board members are appointed, not elected.   I expect the Wash Supreme Court will be faced with the question of constitutionality again.

MikeZ3553
MikeZ3553

This is a terrible crime, but it's not just a charter school problem. Why weren't these recent thefts mentioned in this story or on this blog, and why didn't these school boards catch the instances of theft below? 


http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/arrest-warrant-sworn-out-cafeteria-worker-accused-/ncyD9/


http://www.ajc.com/feed/news/police-over-3-million-stolen-in-floyd-county/fCJgMw/


In addition to those examples, let's not forget former State School Superintendent Linda Schrenko was convicted for embezzling hundreds of thousands of federal education dollars. There's also the case involving Former DeKalb School Superintendent Crawford Lewis; Pat Reid, the chief operating officer for DeKalb County Schools and Reid's ex-husband, architect Tony Pope. That case focused on corruption in the district's construction program. 


AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@MikeZ3553 Maybe because Linda Schrenko didn't steal enough money to shut down the state education system, it may not be quite the same.


You seem to be using the "what about the other speeders" argument.

eulb
eulb

@MikeZ3553 I would like to know more about  the Fulton County cafeteria manager and the Floyd County RICO case.  I did a quick search but did not find any current info about either one.

bu22
bu22

@AvgGeorgian @MikeZ3553 He's just pointing out that its not JUST a charter school problem.  Corruption has been rampant in public schools as well.  It was about a million in the Chicago schools by Rahm Emmanuel's appointed superintendent.

gapeach101
gapeach101

The problem with most charter schools and money, is there is an imbalance of power between the people doing the spending and the people who should be watching the money.  It's hard for a nonprofessional to stand up to a professional and demand answers.  This will be an ongoing issue with charter schools.


In this case the board was clearly derelict.  They were professionals, but didn't want to be bothered with the money side. Perhaps they were more interested in being "on the board" than doing the work a board should do? 

bu22
bu22

@gapeach101 You are describing DeKalb County and Crawford Lewis/Pat Reid.

gapeach101
gapeach101

Either the GA PTSA or the National PTSA has a system of accounting for funds received and disbursed, written for non accounting types.  Had these simple rules been followed, the theft would have been discovered the first year.

JohnB
JohnB


Astropig spends a lot of time debating whether charter schools are private or public, but his main point seems to be that this latest fraud in GA is an isolated event and is being used by the "'lefties'" and the unions who resist any change to the status quo. If he did just a little research, he might have discovered that the Center for Popular Democracy released a report in 2014 that studied 15 states and found 136 million in charter school fraud. An additional study in 2015 by the Center for Popular Democracy found 200 million in charter school fraud and estimated that federal, state, and local governments stood to lose 1.4 billion to charter school fraud because "'The vast majority of fraud perpetuated by charter schools will go undetected because federal, state, and local governments lack the oversight necessary to detect the fraud.'" Also, it  reported that 16 New York City charter school CEOs earned more than the head of the city's public school system in 2011-12. Line up folks, the gravy train is in town. 


AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@JohnB Now we see more of why charter school operators are so eager to run a charter school. This type of fraud could be happening at ALL charter schools to varying degrees. we will never know because they hide their finances from the taxpayer, the state, and. it seems, their own boards.

eulb
eulb

"...  this board acted as responsibly as possible given the information available to them."

I'm not buying that.  What info was not available to them?  Surely Chris Clemons was not the only human on the planet who was allowed to look at the school's bank statements.  When the new principal took a look at the bank statements, she quickly and easily saw the inappropriate transfers and expenditures.  They weren't artfully disguised or hidden.  If the board didn't know about them, they certainly should have.  

So why didn't they know?   Latin Academy's board members have stellar resumes.  At least 2 of them are experienced in looking into wrongdoing by school administrators and teachers.  Didn't we watch Kathleen Mathers testify day-after-day in the APS teachers' cheating trial?  None of those board members are naive.  I've seen no credible excuse for this board's and this state's failure to detect large, unauthorized expenditures from the school's bank account. 


MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

Just got a statement from the Georgia Charter Schools Association defending both charter schools overall and the board of the Latin Academy.

In its defense of the Latin Academy board, the Georgia Charter Schools Association says “in the absence of a negative audit or any other evidence of malfeasance, this board acted as responsibly as possible given the information available to them.”

However, as AJC education reporter Molly Bloom pointed out in her AJC story, there were actually multiple negative audit findings in the most recent audit.

While the board acted once the missing $600,000 was discovered, why did it take so long to notice the alleged theft? 

This is not a small amount of cash; this is not $2,000 in missing candy sales or yearbook deposits. And if boards of charter schools can't be expected to follow spending closely enough to detect this level of theft, who is responsible?  

Here is the statement:

Georgia Charter Schools Association disagrees with conclusions that have been drawn by The Atlanta Journal Constitution regarding theft that reportedly occurred at Latin Academy in Atlanta. GCSA also opposes editorials that have been written based upon the AJC’s misleading framing of the matter.

The terrible act of alleged theft that occurred at Latin Academy Charter School is an isolated incident and the work of one bad actor, former school leader Chris Clemons. Although this alleged crime occurred at a charter school, theft of this kind happens in every industry including: banks, government, businesses, and traditional public schools. We disagree with those who say thefts like this are more likely to happen in charter schools. The facts do not support that conclusion. There have been a number of documented instances of embezzlement, theft, misuse of public money, and just plain mismanagement of funds by bad actors in non-charter public schools and within Georgia school districts.  

Statements have also been made that imply the Latin Academy board was “asleep at the wheel” during and after this theft. However, in the absence of a negative audit or any other evidence of malfeasance, this board acted as responsibly as possible given the information available to them. As soon as a problem was discovered, the board took immediate steps to report their suspicions of fraudulent activity to law enforcement and school district officials.

There are those using this isolated incident to justify opposition to public charter schools. However, GCSA believes that nothing has happened to change the need or right of public charter schools to operate. Charter schools are held to higher standards than other public schools in many respects. For instance, charter schools are routinely closed if they do not reach their performance or other goals, including financial management and sustainability.

The member schools that make up GCSA and the Georgia Department of Education initiated the call for recent legislation passed by the Georgia legislature and signed by Gov. Deal that tightens the financial management for charter schools. HB 895 requires more training for those managing charter school finances (including staff and board) and separation of duties between charter school leadership and those in charge of financial accounting.

Contact:

Michelle Wirth, Director of Communications
Georgia Charter Schools Association


Astropig
Astropig

@MaureenDowney


Agree.This was an (alleged) criminal act.This has brought out the charter haters.

eulb
eulb

@Astropig @MaureenDowney 

You don't have to be a charter hater to be incensed about what happened at Latin Academy.  Charter proponents should be outraged.  This is not an instance where the school had to close because it was failing its students academically.  Students were doing well.  This school could have been charter proponents' greatest success in GA.  But it is broke and closed due to blatant theft that occurred over a long enough period of time that both the school's board and the state agencies should have noticed and intervened.  Where is their accountability?

Astropig
Astropig

@eulb @Astropig @MaureenDowney


They were (as I understand it) lied to and showed phony financial statements.What would you do if your wife (or husband) was spending money on crazy stuff and showing you dummy documentation? Good grief, I AM outraged by this as anyone.No way I defend this guy.But again,lots of school boards and oversight committees have been fooled by slick hustlers with a good line of BS.It's how humans behave.It's a tragedy because these kids were deprived of the school they loved,but hating on other charters isn't going to fix that.

eulb
eulb

@Astropig 

This was not a marriage between 2 people where one could conceivably hide financial wrongdoing from the other.  This was a corporation with a board full of very savvy professionals.  Few, if any, Georgia charter schools have a board so well-qualified to oversee finances.  If they could fail so spectacularly, other charter schools are surely very vulnerable.  How would you fix that problem?  How do you propose to prevent other charters from being robbed and ruined and taxpayers' funds wasted?

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Astropig @eulb @MaureenDowney These professionals charged with oversight are not rubes; their negligence is inexcusable, as is the negligence of the state officials who are supposed to monitor charter schools they have approved.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Astropig @eulb @MaureenDowney Get your snout out of the sand. I apologize for the upcoming caps - CHARTER SCHOOLS DO NOT HAVE TO PROVIDE THE SAME PUBLIC REPORTS ON SALARIES AND VENDOR PAYMENTS. 

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Astropig @MaureenDowney


Somebody sell Astro a charter house and give him a charter loan that has waivers for all that normal red tape like deeds, surveys, truth in lending - you know all that useless stuff that regular people need. Too funny. 

cellophane
cellophane

https://scsc.georgia.gov/meeting-minutes-2016  Four of the 15 State Charter Commission schools operating in 2014-15 were late submitting audits -- and three of the schools STILL have not turned in their audits that were due Oct. 1.  Georgia Charter Education Foundation runs two charter schools and hasn't updated their website or meeting schedule in over a year-- a clear violation of open meetings law.  When a citizen notified the charter commission staff of the violation, they advised to file an open meetings violation with the attorney general.  In other words, not our problem.  Keep digging, Molly Bloom-- this is the tip of the iceberg.  Georgians were sold a bill of goods about "more accountability" on charters.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@cellophane And are about to be sold an even more expensive one with the OSD, if the constitutional amendment passes, which, given its language, it will.

dsw2contributor
dsw2contributor

"thousands of dollars spent at Mercedes-Benz of Buckhead"... which probably paid for an oil change and tire rotation.  :-)



Maureen, a dumb question:  do the board members of a charter school have any skin in the game?  Are they on the hook when money goes missing?

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@Astropig @MaureenDowney @dsw2contributor Charter schools are public schools freed up from a lot of the regulations. (The pact is more freedom for more student achievement, as agreed upon in the charter contract.)

Some of the freedom is over finances, and this is a case of the risks that come with fewer restraints on spending.

BRV
BRV

How they are defined and their legal status are two entirely different things. I'd link to the relevant law review article but it's behind a paywall. Anyway the authors concluded that legal status of charter schools is murky at best. There is no question about the status of public schools. They are public entities, period.

The facts are that charters have successfully argued in some instances that they are not subject to federal and state laws in a manner similar to public schools because they don't hold the status of public entity.

Sometimes they've persuaded bureaucrats that they aren't subject to the same laws even when they are in fact not exempt. The charter captured USDoE agreed to redact all sorts of information about KIPP schools based on a claim from KIPP that things like data about attrition rates at their schools is proprietary information and that as a non-public entity they aren't subject to FOIA. USDoE agreed to most of KIPP's broad request to redact data. If a public school made the same request they'd be told to pound sand as they should be.

Legal status matters in regulatory issues. Regardless of what they are named in statute, unless courts recognize them as identical to public schools then as far as regulatory compliance is concerned they aren't public schools. That is a large not a small difference especially given the leeway they have to spend money.

Also, love the way you've jumped on the "happens everywhere" fallacy being sold by charter lobbyists.

MaureenDowney
MaureenDowney moderator

@dsw2contributor No, they are not on the hook. They are not liable. 


It appears this board took a keen interest in the academics but did not delve into the finances.


This is also the case of an extraordinarily charismatic leader who seems to have dazzled people everywhere he went.


One point on the traditional public school vs. charter school debate here; charters enjoy more financial leeway -- it's the basis of the charter model -- so there is greater access to greater sums of money. Public schools misspend but it is often with money collected outside the operating budget. It's the money raised through candy sales or sports boosters that goes missing -- not operating funds that are typically handled at the district level and paid directly to vendors, teachers etc.  There are not a lot of discretionary dollars lying around the schools.

Another comment
Another comment

Actually on an E series the " C" service". Which is more complex than just the oil change is only around $300-349, very reasonable in the world of Luxury cars. Plus you get a loaner car during the service if you schedule it.

That large of bill was a major amount of work. I have owned an E series Mercedes and had it served and repaired exclusively at Mercedes Benz of Buckhead ( except tires) and have only spent $5,600 in 7 years over 79,000 miles. Which is reasonable.

Then I pay out of my own pocket not a company card, and question every single quote.

Ashley Langford
Ashley Langford

Is this school chartered by the local BOE or a private sector company?

AJC  Get Schooled
AJC Get Schooled

The Atlanta Board of Education approved the school in 2012. You can read the petition below:

Tom Green
Tom Green

In the private sector, that's what is known as merit pay.

gactzn2
gactzn2

Major fatal flaw: Charter Schools are businesses with a financial interest in educating children.  When it ceases to be profitable- they will dissolve their assets and cease to operate said business.  May even go bankrupt and stick the public with the bill and displaced students.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@gactzn2 @Astropig Nor can they "cool kids out" by saying, "We just cannot provide what Timmy needs here at our school."

gactzn2
gactzn2

@Astropig @gactzn2 Public schools cannot remove students because their parents failed to fulfill their parental obligations to the charter school.

BRV
BRV

Legally charter schools aren't public entities per federal and state case law. Public schools are public entities. You can call charter schools whatever you want but they aren't legal equivalents of public schools. Learn what the Hawkins County test and the actual operations standard are. Educate yourself.

Astropig
Astropig

@BRV


" You can call charter schools whatever you want"


They are public schools.

Astropig
Astropig

@gactzn2 @Astropig


Which is why lots of parents are abandoning zip code,status quo schools.They do what status quo schools say they want-parental involvement,but when they do get that,who attacks them? -Zip code school status quo defenders.

BRV
BRV

Way to avoid addressing what I wrote. Legally they are not the same as public schools. That is a simple, and from a regulatory perspective very important, legal fact.

gactzn2
gactzn2

@Astropig @BRV Tell that to the students in the Gwinnett charter school who were displaced after the charter school received FTE funding last year. What happened- announced that they were closing the school- in October. What public school can do that?

BRV
BRV

No it doesn't answer anything. Federal and state courts have ruled that charter schools and public schools aren't identical actors under the law. Whenever charter schools find some portion of regulation or disclosure inconvenient their default argument is that they shouldn't be subject to it because they aren't public entities. They don't always win with that argument, but sometimes they do because under the law they aren't public entities.

Bitly
Bitly

@Astropig @gactzn2 

Yes, it turns out the Obamas and other wealthy Democrats—aren't the only ones fleeing traditional public schools.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Astropig @BRV They are public schools.  They just don't have to follow the same rules.


Fixed it.

EdJohnson
EdJohnson

@Astropig

Would you care to describe EXACTLY how charter schools are public schools?

Astropig
Astropig

@EdJohnson @Astropig


They are public schools,Ed.You know that.I wish Maureen would reprogram her robots here.She is always quick to get in my grill over any perceived inaccuracy,but she could settle this pretty quick.

Astropig
Astropig

@gactzn2 @Astropig @BRV


"announced that they were closing the school- in October. What public school can do that?"


 They did it in my Florida county with a school that was the cornerstone of the community for over 75 years.They announced that it would close for good and did it this last May 21.The kids there have to now ride 45 minutes one way on the bus (they get on in front of my house at the corner before daylight during a lot of the school year),which means that the equivalent of an entire school day per week is spent riding back and forth.Parents there begged the school board not to do this,but they did it anyway.

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

@Wascatlady @Astropig @BRV Any public school district in Georgia can request the identical waivers under Title 20 of O.C.G.A. that any charter school can request. 


Fixed it.

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

@gactzn2 @Astropig No district public school can remove a child for the parent's actions/failure to act. Neither can charter public schools. 

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

@EdJohnson @Astropig They receive public funds and are, regardless of authorizer, ultimately accountable to the State Board of Education of Georgia. 

ErnestB
ErnestB

@DrMonicaHenson @gactzn2 @Astropig


Are you sure about this?  We have several choice schools that have parental involvement contracts and/or minimum GPA requirements.  I think the language of the contracts permit removal from the choice program hence sometimes the school.

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

@Astropig @gactzn2 @BRV Yes, public schools are closed. Our local one was closed 5 years ago. A travesty.


The point of the poster you are replying to is that the charter school waited till the FTE count, took the money, then announced it was closing.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@DrMonicaHenson @EdJohnson @Astropig 


Please give us an update on Provost Charter School(I think you were/are superintendent) and their continued operation despite failing every year and not meeting their goals. Also, please tell us where to find salary and vendor payment data online now and available to the public.


Provost seems to have changed its name - same entity?

gactzn2
gactzn2

@Astropig @gactzn2 You should do the same- they are treated as public entities but are not public schools- public schools have strict oversight and rules they must follow!!!

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

@Wascatlady @DrMonicaHenson @Astropig @BRV I'm not sure if Georgia law requires that districts provide transportation. When I was a principal in North Carolina, districts were not required to provide it, and I reminded the parents of the rowdy kid on the school bus that popped up on occasion of that fact. 

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

@ErnestB @DrMonicaHenson @gactzn2 @Astropig Many choice schools have so-called "parental involvement contracts." However, these "contracts" are unenforceble via removal of students from school should parents fail to fulfill them. Any removal of a student from a public school (district or charter) requires that due process of law be followed. Punishing a child with expulsion for the act or failure to act by a parent is outside the realm of due process and illegal. 

DrMonicaHenson
DrMonicaHenson

@gactzn2 @DrMonicaHenson @ErnestB @Astropig I don't doubt that this happens on occasion. Unfortunately, it also happens on occasion in district public schools, too. Students are pushed out the door, and those who don't know the law and how to navigate the system cannot help them.