Faced with no recorded grades for students, what should Atlanta Public Schools have done?

Many people are debating this week’s decision by Atlanta Public Schools to give a new job to Josie Love, the former principal of Carver Technology High School who awarded grades of 85 to about 65 students in classes where long-term substitute teachers never filed any grades for the 2014 fall semester.

And there is the ongoing secondary drama about the eventual termination of a Carver Technology High secretary who balked at entering the faked grades; she said her job loss was retaliation while APS said her position was eliminated in a consolidation.

As the AJC reported this week:

An Atlanta high school principal involved in a grade-changing scandal will become a director in Atlanta Public Schools’ human resources office. As principal of Carver School of Technology, Josie Love in 2015 ordered a secretary to award dozens of students grades they had not earned.

The students had been taught by substitutes and had not received grades. Love told the secretary to give them all Bs for the semester. The secretary refused, saying it would be unethical. Other staff entered the grades and Love eliminated the secretary’s position at the end of the year, when Carver School of Technology merged with another school.

The Atlanta school board voted Monday night unanimously to make Love the new strategic director for human resources for high schools. In her new position, Love will take the lead on actions affecting high school employees, according to a district job description. Her new job duties include helping with terminating and hiring staff and assisting with hiring new principals, according to the description.

Love will make about $5,000 less in her new job than she did this year as a high school assistant principal, district spokeswoman Jill Strickland said. Love was in her first year as principal during the grading incident last year, district spokeswoman Jill Strickland said.

Here are some critical questions:

What should have been the school’s response to students who attended class but had no grades to show for it because of adult failures?

And what should have been Superintendent Meria Carstarphen’s response to a school administration that provided woefully inadequate supervision to the substitutes hired to take over for a teacher whose family medical leave went longer than the expected two weeks?

APS allowed the students at Carver to keep their blanket Bs.  (It also maintained the grades awarded to students in other grade-changing incidents at South Atlanta and Washington high schools.)

In my view, APS had no choice. If students attend a class, districts cannot then order them to repeat it or go to summer school because no one bothered to record grades. In those circumstances, any parent would be furious if a child ended up with an  “incomplete” or a failing grade.

While I see no good solution in these situations, whatever is decided should always favor the students as they are blameless. It may well be that assigning an 85 to all the students was the fairest solution. (Carver allowed students who believed they merited an A to complete a project to bring up the grade.)

Carver Tech could have attempted to reconstruct class work and testing trails for each child, but that was discussed by school officials and ruled out as impossible, according to APS’s internal review. Apparently, there was nothing to reconstruct.

The 12-page report — I put it in a Google doc for you to read — is depressing as no one seems to take any responsibility. For example, the report questions whether the five to seven substitute teachers were ever instructed to submit grades or give graded assignments. No one seems to know for sure, saying there were too many subs to establish what was happening in the classrooms.

In the report, principal Love says she was confident students “were receiving instruction and being assessed.” Later, she admits she checked the classroom and found no work, graded or ungraded.

I agree the principal is ultimately responsible, but the report suggests several school administrators with longer tenures at Carver assumed all was well with the string of substitutes. The vice principal and instructional coach provided disappointing responses to why they weren’t monitoring the subs and the classes more closely.

If you have time, read the report and let me know what you think. The report depicts a school culture that appears counter to everything Carstarphen says she wants to create in APS — a student-focus, alert leaders who pay attention and accountability.  Based on the report, the grade fiasco reflects a lack of leadership and ownership.

Here is a statement released this week by APS Chief of Human Resources Pamela Hall on Love’s hiring:

As the Chief Human Resources Officer, I made a recommendation to hire Josie Love as one of our strategic directors in the Office of Human Resources.  In this role, Ms. Love will be responsible for working with our high school principals to staff their schools.  Yes, Ms. Love was the subject of an investigation conducted by my office related to grades being assigned inappropriately at Carver High School.  Our investigation revealed that Ms. Love did not take the proper steps to assess the work of a group of students and assign grades accordingly during the long-term absence of a teacher.  The recommendation from the investigation was that Ms. Love be demoted.  As a result, Ms. Love served as an assistant principal for the 2015-16 school year.

Additionally, this offense was reported to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.  The PSC made a decision not to take further action in this case and deemed the actions of APS appropriate. I must clarify that Ms. Love did not terminate the secretary who reported this violation. Several positions at Carver School of Technology were eliminated by the district because of the consolidation of several small schools on the Carver High School campus.  The secretary remains eligible for employment with APS, and I support her re-employment.  However, she must participate in the interview process and be selected for a position.

Ms. Love is a professional fully capable of functioning in the role of Strategic Director with the primary responsibility of assisting principals.  She made a mistake, accepted the consequences, and served well in her role as assistant principal during the 2015-16 school year.  When making these critical decisions, I consider all of the facts. Based upon my knowledge of the circumstances in this case, I concluded that Ms. Love was worthy of an opportunity to serve APS in this capacity.

As a leader who came with Superintendent Dr. Meria J. Carstarphen to join the APS team, I embrace the importance of doing this work with integrity.

 

Reader Comments 1

73 comments
eulb
eulb

"What should have been the school’s response to students who attended class but had no grades to show for it because of adult failures?"  

Well, maybe the administrators should have done what North Atlanta High did when a similar scenario unfolded there.

My son was a student at North Atlanta during and after the "Bloody Sunday" administration purge during Errol Davis' superintendency.  Short-term substitute teachers were common.  Long term subs were pretty rare especially in science & math courses.  Parents could not rely on Infinite Campus to monitor their students' progress.  In some courses, teachers simply failed to enter data in IC.  In others, IC was completely disabled -- possibly due to having only short-term substitutes, not permanent teachers, covering so many classes.  Real teaching and student assessment fell by the wayside.  My son had 4 courses in 4 years where the teacher he started with at the beginning of the semester was not the teacher in charge at the end of the semester. One of those instances is similar to the situation described in the report.
 Here's what North Atlanta did and didn't do after administrators learned of the problem: (1) The principal did NOT make up grades out of thin air and enter them into the students' records.  (2) Students were given a test/exam at the end of 1st semester.  Every single student flunked the test. (Ouch.)  (3) It would be unfair to give all students F for the semester, so every student temporarily received an "incomplete" on their report card. (4) During 2nd semester, the teacher returned to the classroom and used the exam results diagnostically. She was able to see what the students already knew and what they still needed to be taught. (5) During the early part of 2nd semester, she taught the essential lessons that should have been covered in first semester, then gave tests to generate legitimate grades.  The administrators then changed each student's "incomplete" to a real grade for 1st  semester.  (6) Students received the necessary course credit for the first semester even though the teaching & learning actually occurred during 2nd semester.

 North Atlanta's solution might work in some cases -- especially when the problem arises during 1st semester of a year-long course.  It certainly beats assigning blanket Bs to every student with no evidence proving students learned any content at all. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@eulb 

That suggestion puts unusual stress upon students when the mistake was not theirs.  Moreover, a remedial reading course is not equivalent to a science class, or any other content area course, in high school.  The progress made by each student in a remedial reading class is determined individually, depending upon where each student's reading skills in vocabulary and comprehension development were prior to having taken the course and compared with that same student's advancement in vocabulary and comprehension skills in reading after having been taught content in that course. All students are not expected to have been at the same beginning level in reading when they were registered in that course, nor will all of the students be expected to advance according to set curriculum criteria for all students in the class.  Each student's reading progress is determined by how much that specific student increased his or her specific reading pretest skills, reflected in his/her post test scores/skills compared with his or her specific pretest reading scores/skills.


It would have been grossly unfair to have put remedial reading students, especially, who are already struggling with reading skills, under the additional pressure of retaking that remedial reading course at the same time that they would be taking other courses, which, more than likely, would have textbooks written over the readability levels of those particular students.  We do not make a bad situation better, through insisting upon  blanket moralistic code without considering the specifics involved, such as the particular body of students who were maligned and what not giving them credit when expected would have done to their future success. In all probability, those particular remedial reading students received adequate instruction to have passed that course at that time, even though substitute teachers did not encode grades for the instruction they gave to those students, daily.

When a surgeon makes the mistake of removing the wrong organ, we do not make the patient suffer the consequences of the surgeon's mistake in addition to having to cope with the problem caused by that unwarranted surgery.

eulb
eulb

@MaryElizabethSings

MES, I'm not trying to make the students suffer any consequences for the adults' failures.  What "blanket moralistic code" are you talking about?

You are more familiar with remedial reading classes than I, so maybe you know whether the Reading Enrichment course is a year-long course.  Is it?  Because if it is, what's wrong with applying North Atlanta's solution? The NA students all received credit for the semester.  None had to retake the course or attend summer school.  Grades reflected students' actual scores on assessments after the content was actually taught.  . 

You wrote "In all probability, those particular remedial reading students received adequate instruction to have passed that course at that time, even though substitute teachers did not encode grades for the instruction they gave to those students, daily."  Unfortunately, I disagree.

Students who need remedial instruction need a very good, experienced, effective teacher on a consistent basis.  They need a teacher who knows each student well enough to individualize their lessons accordingly.  A string of short-term substitutes sounds like the least likely scenario for those students to get the kind of instruction they need. To me, it seems improbable that the students received adequate instruction.  It's a very sad situation and not the students' fault.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@eulb @MaryElizabethSings


I agree with you that it is "a very sad situation and not the students' fault."


My perceptions come from years of thinking, reading, and being prepared for seeing life in a higher consciousness than many people are even concerned with daily.  I am sorry if some who read my words, here, will think that my words are egotistical, but I value truth more than acting in concordance with group norms and that is the truth.  I cannot possibly explain to you what decades of study, and even placing myself in another, more intellectual/spiritual environment than I was receiving here in the South when I was in my 20s, has caused me to know that we must resist thinking in platitudes and moralistic generalities.  If you do not see what I see about that relative to this specific case, I cannot possibly make you understand through my words, which reflect my perceptions acquired over the course of my life.


More pragmatically, I will say that the advanced reading classes which I taught, and the remedial and personalized classes which I supervised, were divided into 3 academic quarters per year (not 2 semesters per year).  I made certain at the beginning of every quarter that every student that was new to my course had the prerequisite skills in reading to master the content taught within my advanced reading course.  If the student was not ready to absorb that content, I made certain through talking with parents, teachers, and counselors that those particular students were switched to the personalized reading, instead, where every student was able to grow in his/her reading development in vocabulary and comprehension at his own pace.


Please be aware that I have not only taught reading but I began my teaching career as a high school English teacher so I well know the difference in how the content must be taught in these two different areas of curriculum, and what students might learn through substitute teachers, even if grades were not given out, through negligence.


Finally, some things are not able to be explained to those who cannot see.  One of those things is how negatively having those students carry the responsibility of accounting for their growth into the future would have done to some of those students.  Even having one be stressed under that pressure would not be worth the cost to that child's emotional development, based on my years of studying human development and reading curriculum skills.


Thank you for your substantive posts and I hope that the conversation between both of us will have stretched the readers' knowledge of the seriousness of handling this unfortunate case with immense care not only for the students but for the adults involved.



MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@eulb P.S.  It is my opinion that educators cannot generalize about this unfortunate situation as to how situations similar to this one should be handled in the future.


Every school situation must be handled individually, based on the details within that specific case, and with enormous care, imo.

eulb
eulb

@MaryElizabethSings 

Well, I guess I'm one of the "those who cannot see" because I'm not grasping where the additional stress and pressure would come from.  I don't claim any particular spiritual enlightenment about this subject.  Just some experience with several instances of students being left in limbo without grades when teachers went on leave.  In one of those instances, the school came up with a solution that did not involve inventing grades out of thin air, so I offered it here.

You seem to think I'm advocating "retaking that remedial reading course at the same time that they would be taking other courses".  I am not.  In the scenario at North Atlanta, none of the students retook anything.  Absolutely nothing was added to their course schedule.  The students merely continued to follow their pre-set schedule for 2nd semester courses. They had to wait a few weeks for their Incompletes to get changed to actual grades with some data behind them.

Data obtained during the first few weeks of the 2nd semester was used to generate grades for 1st semester.  So at that point, semester grades were changed from Incomplete to actual grades.  2nd semester grades were collected and processed normally. 

 I'm not grasping how any of that put any additional pressure on the students. 

The teacher who returned from maternity leave probably did feel additional pressure.  Through no fault of her own, that course completely fell apart during her absence.  She probably did not look forward to returning when her maternity leave ended. She knew that mess awaited her.  She could have chosen not to return.  Fortunately, she DID return and she did a good job of leading the class through the remainder of the school year.  I admired her for that and I think the students did, too.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@eulb @MaryElizabethSings


Evidently, in that particular case there were no beginning grades to generate an approximate grade for a full semester's work. Moreover, I do not believe from a strictly moralistic point of view that the first few weeks of the grades of students reflect the final grade they would have individually received after a full semester's work, with any authentic purity.  


Again, remedial reading skills are taught in a significantly different manner than either science and math (or English) skills.


We have probably exhausted our differing positions on this case; however, rather than assuming the principal acted in a self-serving, devious manner, I would prefer to give her the benefit of the doubt that she acted in the best interest of those specific remedial reading students.


Naturally, the group which assessed her gave the principal (her) the responsibility for the negligence because she is responsible, ultimately, for everything that happens in her school, but thinking deeper, I tried to present another scenario in which she may have even tried to protect the person to whom she had assigned responsibility for the class' continuity by assuming that responsibility herself, in the end.


I simply believe that demotion to assistant principal from principal was sufficient for punishment, in that case. I further believe that her system is trying to make lemonade out of lemons so that there is no more pain given to anyone and that the negligence is corrected in every future situation in the APS where there is a need for long term substitute teachers.


That is the best and most positive possible outcome for everyone in that unfortunate case, imho.

FlaTony
FlaTony

Basically, the administration of the school have no excuses in this case. The blames lays squarely at their feet.

eulb
eulb

Is there an online site where we can see an archived video of the Atlanta BOE meeting or at least minutes of the meeting?  Anybody got a link?   I'm hunting around but finding nothing. 

I'm just really surprised at this unanimous decision by the board. I'd like to see their discussion of this matter, notes, and minutes of the meeting.  Looking at the report and then their vote, I can't imagine what they were thinking.


MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

Thoughts from my blog, from months ago, reposted here:


"I believe that humankind has been in a constant evolution toward the Godhead since the beginning of time and that our Founding Fathers had played their parts in this advancement, Abraham Lincoln played his part, and Martin Luther King, Jr. played his part.  Each generation has had its great leaders who have built on the spiritual advancement of the others as humanity itself has advanced with them. Barack Obama has played his part in the ongoing realization that we are more than physical bodies and that we are more than a survival of the fittest consciousness. Thanks be to God for the reality of love and of grace.

———————————————

I have long believed that the world would fare better if those of business world would attempt to emulate some of the best practices of the educational world, rather than the reverse.

Here is a metaphysical thought for those who are so inclined.  The business world is symbolic of the masculine psyche (contained within both men and women) and the educational world is symbolic of the feminine psyche (contained in both men and women).  The world, through spiritual evolution, is in the process of moving more toward the consciousness of the feminine psyche (nurturing) than that of the masculine psyche (dominating).”

hssped
hssped

Sounds like a whole bunch of people go to work to collect a paycheck and that's it.  God forbid someone do their job. 

FredinDeKalb
FredinDeKalb

Are there plans for a blog on the racketeering charges impacting the Floyd County School System?  Given all the blogs regarding financial mismanagement allegations for other school systems in the metro area, it would be interesting to see the level of comments for this case.  In my opinion, these allegations are far more egregious and have gone on for a longer period of time. 

I've always said that what APS, Clayton and DeKalb were accused and vilified for goes on in far more school districts than many would admit.


Astropig
Astropig

@FredinDeKalb



"Are there plans for a blog on the racketeering charges impacting the Floyd County School System? "


Don't count on it. Now if it involves charter schools,you'll see more than you ever imagined,but status quo,zip code schools? Maybe a line in passing.


Just the other day, hours after we raked Latin Academy over the charter haters coals,came word that another coach had been misusing school monies,but...Radio silence.


It seems that the "shoe leather" reporters are more apt to stick to balance and let the chips fall where they may on education topics in the media in Atlanta.They seem less beholden to their ideological brethren.  

Mary Owens Ridgeway
Mary Owens Ridgeway

No they should not have re hired her at all. She should never be able to work in the school system ever again.

Rod Sheppard
Rod Sheppard

They would do something like this in San Antonio.

Lewis Foster
Lewis Foster

Former principal couldn't manage the substitute teachers and fixed students grades to cover up her in comptance. How can she bring any value to school system?

Another comment
Another comment

Principals unfortunately give the "B" as a solution more frequently than you know. These same give the "B", because they can't think outside the box end up being promoted to very high positions in other school districts as well. My child had this happen to her in Cobb County.

My daughter go very ill her freshman year with the swine flu. She was in the IB program at Campbell High School in Cobb and a certain principal who has now been promoted to Cobb County's top Education Cabinet did the following. My daughter had all A's when she got sick. She was first sick for two weeks with a high fever. Then went back to school for 4 days and once again had another high fever which lasted over one month to six weeks . She was diagnosed with H1N1.

Cobb faught tooth and nail over providing a Hospital Homebound teacher. They won't assign one for 3 weeks. Then even with the doctors note, they insisted on releases from infectious disease doctor. Who stated after x amount of time a fever is no longer contagious. Then when we got the Home Bound teacher he had no experience in French, no experience in IB classes. They had just changed to Math 1,2,3 and he had no training, in that. The only class he could help with was the the health portion of PE. Then when my daughter was able to start going back to class she was very week, she could only make it through one, then two classes a day. It took her weeks to make it up to a full day and full week. She of course could not run the one mile for PE. The doctor gave her an excuse that her disability prevented her from doing this.

She had all the work done for Health/PE. The principal mandated that she receive a Withdraw/ incomplete from this, even though she had an A. Then her other 3 classes, for which I asked she be given a W/I, so that she could retake the classes. He insisted that she be given a B. So she was stuck with a 3.0 GPA Freshman year.

This was a horrible hole for a kid who had dreams of being a top ten to dig out of just because she got sick. Then to boot the criteria for Full Hope was changed her Junior year. My daughter ended with a HOPE GPA of 3.6 just below the 3.7, Because of Principal "B" syndrome. This has cost us lots of money because my daughter is a Senior in college and has a 3.8 in a STEM major and would have held a full HOPE. The cavilar just give them B's also cost her admissions to college and other scholarships.

It is nothing short of laziness by theses administrative staff. The one in Cobb is now the head of Teaching and Learning.

cmac22
cmac22

It's the government ... there are no leaders thus, no one to take responsibility

Randy Lillquist
Randy Lillquist

if we have to ask these questions our school system is doomed .

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

You know, it is even worse than I was thinking. Not only did the principal fail to carry out her job, but she also was found by the APS investigation to have LIED.  Yet she is promoted?  Why?

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

The level of non-attention is quite unbelievable. In my system, supervisors check to be sure each teacher or long-term sub enters grades at least weekly.  This is not to mention the apparent non-instruction to the subs to provide grades, and how to do so.


At what point after the term was over did the principal notice the lack of grades (and then instruct the clerical staff person to award the Bs?)  I am guessing it was too late to give some kind of summative test to provide an end of the term idea of student learning.  Did the students get instruction or merely babysitting?  Did they learn anything?


Under the circumstances, I guess the awarding of Bs was all they could do.  What percentage of the students did the extra work for a higher grade (I think this would be telling.)?


The system really opened itself up to lawsuit in eliminating that position at that time. I would guess the staff member has ample room for a suit.


Finally, the hiring of that principal for a central office job merely show what many of us in the trenches have seen--boot an incompetent up to the next level--the Peter Principle.  If she cannot oversee an individual school (with assorted underlings) she has NO BUSINESS  working in the central office of any system.  Ms. Carstarphen again shows incompetence in allowing this to happen.

class80olddog
class80olddog

I guess APS accomplished what they wanted to accomplish - no teacher or secretary will DARE refuse when ordered to cheat.  I think APS has learned their lesson from the Beverly Hall days - cheat BETTER and don't get caught.

Astropig
Astropig

@xxxzzz @class80olddog


Couldn't agree more. You'll know that APS has really changed when the whistleblowers report to work after a scandal and the wrongdoers are out looking for work.

bu22
bu22

@class80olddog Culture hasn't changed.  Incompetence is rewarded.  Honesty punished.

class80olddog
class80olddog

I wonder if Pamela Hall is any relation to Beverly Hall.

eulb
eulb

@class80olddog  Pamela Hall worked in Carstarphen's school administration in Austin, TX, and was hired away from Texas as part of Carstarphen's transition team. If there's a family connection with Beverly Hall, I haven't found it. 

class80olddog
class80olddog

Now I am confused - the report says 65 students in "classes" (plural).  So there was more than one class?  One teacher was out longer than expected with medical problems but what happened in the other class(es)? 

ScienceTeacher671
ScienceTeacher671

@class80olddog It's high school. Depending on schedules, a teacher might have 3-6 classes per semester.  These sound like remedial classes, and might therefore have been smaller than normal.

class80olddog
class80olddog

This is "business as usual" at APS - failure to monitor the class (did the people assigned to monitor the class lose their jobs?), assigning grades not earned, fire the whistleblower, promote the cheater.  Thank goodness we will soon have an OSD to take over APS's failures.  You can spin it any way you want, but the person who committed the crimes is promoted, and the whistleblower is still unemployed.  This NEVER should have reached the point where grades should have to be "given".  Eve after that, grades of "incomplete" could have been assigned until testing could determine a level of mastery.  Did these students have any EOC tests?  If not, why not?  A total cluster, but APS makes it even worse by keeping (and promoting) the incompetents and firing the ethical.  Now you see why there is the push for "accountability".  The only issue I have with it is that it concentrates on teachers rather than on administrators, where most of the problems lie.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

Imo, all the steps that have been taken so far are appropriate.


Love made the right decision in giving all students a blanket grade of 85, with the opportunity to raise that grade to an A status with a completed project done with caliber.


I suspect that there are many principals, and not just in the APS, who have not had enough direct oversight of the grades that substitute teachers give to their students, or in this case, do not give to their students.  This was an extreme example that came to publicity.  Perhaps, this unfortunate case can shine a light to all principals to formulate very precise accountability for the grades given to, and the quality of instruction of, students under a substitute, or under a stream of substitutes, care.


Love, to her credit, did the right thing, bottom line.  She put the fairness to the needs of the students, who were maligned, first.  Her call in that regard was perfect.  The Professional Standards Commission for Educators made the right call in not harming Love's professional career, further.  Love should have been able to continue serving in the APS in a leadership position in which she can continue giving her gifts of helping others, in order to make a positive difference for the APS, in the future.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

P.S. Perhaps in her new position as a Strategic Director working with assistant principals throughout the APS, Love can use her experience in this unfortunate case to formulate lasting guidelines with assistant principals in the APS to incorporate a system-wide policy of monitoring the progress of students under substitute teachers with precision, cohesion, and care.  That role should rightly be in the hands of the assistant principals (or Instructional Lead Teachers) within a school, not the principal, unless there is no assistant principal within the school.

insideview
insideview

@MaryElizabethSings I disagree, the right thing would have been to ensure the class was being monitored, and to follow through with who  was assigned to monitor the class. The reality is it was a remedial reading class, and the students didn't get the help they needed. We all understand that sometimes it is hard to secure a sub, but the administrators failed to check on the students and the class, and then sought to blame the secretary. 


The principal did retaliate against the secretary. According to the report, although they found the write ups were justified, they all occurred after the secretary  complained. That's retaliation. Apparently, the secretary's  performance wasn't an issue if she had been willing to commit fraud at the principal's request. Yes, the principal made a mistake, and yes, she is entitled to a second chance, but so is the secretary. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@insideview @MaryElizabethSings


I found no fault with the secretary's actions. Please do not assume that I have. Also, the students should have been monitored, on that I agree.  However, as I stated, normally that monitoring would have been done by an assistant principal or instructional lead teacher, not the principal.


I have yet to read the full report. I have read the full article, above.

redweather
redweather

@MaryElizabethSings From the report:

"Ms. Love failed to monitor student performance for Ms. Johnson's classes in violation of IHA (R) (I), GAGC, and PSC Standard 10.

Ms. Love failed to assess mastery of student performance when she issued an arbitrary grade of 85 to all students of Ms. Johnson's Reading Enrichment classes . . . in violation of IHA (R) (I), GAGC, and PSC Standard 10.

Ms. Love provided untruthful testimony in the course of an investigation in violation of GAGC and PSC Standard 4."

Nor can I believe you are defending Ms. Love based on the quoted excerpts from the Conclusion of the report.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@redweather @MaryElizabethSings


I am neither defending nor condemning Ms. Love.  It has been my experience that those who insist upon thinking either in dichotomies, or in stereotypical images, limit their thinking capabilities.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@redweather 

P.S. I have now read very quickly over the full report, including the Conclusion, and I have noticed that the principal, Ms. Love, had assigned an ELA teacher by the name of Ms. Rogers to be the staff member to monitor the progress of the students in the reading class, after the regular teacher took a leave of absence, and during the time that her students were served by substitute teachers.

I also noticed that Ms. Love was found not to have used retaliation against the school's secretary, Ms. Veal. 

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

Then pray explain why this policy has not long since been established, since APS has been grading students for over 100 years.

How many other basic policies are not clearly established?

redweather
redweather

@MaryElizabethSings @redweather From you comments:

"Love made the right decision in giving all students a blanket grade of 85, with the opportunity to raise that grade to an A status with a completed project done with caliber."

"Love, to her credit, did the right thing, bottom line." 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@redweather @MaryElizabethSings 

Given the full context of the choices available to her because of the negligence of someone on her staff, I believe that Ms. Love did make the best choice possible so that the students did not lose their academic credits, through no fought of their own, for the reading course for which they had registered. There is no proof that the students were not given competent instruction through the stream of substitutes who taught them daily.
 (Ms. Love had assigned a staff member to monitor that class in the absence of the regular teacher.)

Bitly
Bitly

Wonder why the Obamas, Clintons and other rich Democrats sent their kids to private schools?

Is it any mystery other parents wish they could, too?

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

I read the report. Love (along with others) was responsible for the failure and Love alone tried to cover it up. All the rest is window dressing that attempts to justify Love's new position.

That this sort of failure reoccurs after the scandal is a damning indictment of APS and its leadership. If the bookkeeper had not balked at changing the grades we would never have known.

Notice that Carstarphen is silent while her HR director faces the public. Carstarphen has talked a good game but has not produced what she promised. I predict she will leave by this time next year.

Astropig
Astropig

@BurroughstonBroch


Agree.Real leaders don't send flunkies to do things that they are afraid to do.This is a total failure of leadership on Carstarphen's part.Maybe she's just not up to the job morally,professionally or ethically-and hiding behind "I didn't know what happened" isn't going to fly,either.She's paid to know the big picture stuff.


I would also call on her to reinstate the secretary that was obviously wronged here.I can't believe that in an organization as big as APS,they don't have room for one person that shows some integrity.

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