Cobb teacher under siege for class “slavery game” shares her side

Parents at Cheatham Hill Elementary received this letter today on the controversy around an activity to teach kids about slavery.

Last week Cobb County fifth-grade teacher Hope Largent hoped to make a class on slavery engaging when she used a teacher-created simulation of the Underground Railroad.

Georgia standards require fifth graders learn about how state’s rights and slavery fueled the growing tensions between the north and south. “It is very hard to bring that down to a 10-year-old’s level,” said Largent, a Georgia Southern graduate in her second year at Cheatham Hill Elementary School.  “I wanted to find something interactive, engaging and memorable.”

That 25-minute classroom activity found on a teacher site proved to be highly memorable — landing Largent in newspapers worldwide and under attack for her “racist slavery game.”

Among the headlines: “Teacher facing discipline after only black student forced to play slave,” and “Back to the Plantation: Outrage after teacher plays slavery game in class with one black student.”

While media reports contend Largent faces disciplinary action, the teacher said she’s unaware of any forthcoming sanctions, and the principal sent a letter home today assuring parents she supports teachers “thinking outside the box.”

Largent told me she believed students enjoyed and learned from the activity in which they rolled dice to face different conditions in a simulated Underground Railroad journey. But Delores Bunch-Keemer, whose granddaughter was in the class, came to school the next morning upset over what she considered the inappropriateness of the exercise and its negative impact on her granddaughter.

Dissatisfied with both the teacher’s and school’s response, Bunch-Keemer took her complaint to the media. After the story went viral the facts became murkier with each retelling.

For example, newspapers reported Bunch-Keemer’s granddaughter was the only black child in the class; the girl was one of four African-Americans out of a diverse class of 23 that includes Hispanic children. Reports stated the girl somehow ended up back at the plantation six times in the simulation– implying some nefarious plot that kept routing her back there. But the journals students filled out on their journey around the room showed the child, like every other student, visited almost every station and was among the half of the class who found freedom.

I reached out to Bunch-Keemer who has been public in her ongoing concerns, posting on Facebook her letter to the principal, but I haven’t heard back from her yet. Until I talk to her, here is one of her Facebook posts on this issue:

Did Ms. Largent receive any guidance last year about this lesson plan before she presented it to students and assumed it would be alright to present to this year’s class? Are there clear and defined goals and objectives for the Civil War curriculum currently being taught to fifth graders? Are other teachers using this curriculum, if so has any other parents expressed concerns about the effects on their child?

I am sure we are aware the institution of slavery is barbaric, is indentured servitude with little chance of obtaining freedom and cannot be assimilated with work for which some type of compensation is earned. I pray that the severity of slavery and its effects on African-Americans is not belittled and compared to a career where you could “be beaten if you don’t like your work.”

Until her interview with me today, Largent declined to talk to the press, but the wildfire spread of misinformation pushed her to speak.

Did Bunch-Keemer’s granddaughter seem upset during the simulation?  Largent said the child appeared to be enjoying the activity with her classmates. When Largent asked the child after her grandmother’s visit why she didn’t report that it bothered her, the girl said, “It wasn’t the game. It was slavery.”

Slavery is a tough topic, said Largent, but the state has made it part of the standards and she has to teach it. “I am going to continue to do my job,” she said. But she has shelved the simulation.

Frustrated with the media accounts, Fay McLaughlin has reached 16 other parents in Largent’s room thus far willing to go on record on the teacher’s behalf.  Many sent letters of support to the principal.

In talking to several Cobb parents today, they all said the same thing: Their kids love Largent.

“She is making a difference in our children’s lives because she is teaching them in a way where they are not just reading the book and taking a test, but so they understand what they are learning,” said McLaughlin. Her daughter never liked to write, but was eager to sit down after the Underground Railroad activity and write about her experiences. Now, her daughter is crying in fear her teacher will be fired, said McLaughlin.

Parent Jennifer Fisher said her daughter thought the simulation “was a great way to learn, because now she better understands what people went through during that time. Personally, I appreciate how much my children can learn from an activity such as this, and I feel hands-on-learning is a very important part of our educational system today. Our family feels strongly about teaching our kids to put themselves into someone else’s shoes and see/understand how blessed they are because of the country we live in. I fully support Ms. Largent’s activity, and would support any activity like this that portrays what life was like in a previous era.”

Parent Alex May said his son calls Largent his favorite teacher ever. “She is vibrant and enthusiastic,” said May.

In a statement late today, teachers on the fifth-grade team at Cheatham Hill blasted what they called “a slanderous assault in the news and on social media” and praised their young colleague.

They wrote:

As part of our program to teach about the Civil War, Hope used an inventive and interactive simulation illustrating the Underground Railroad. This is a required section we’ve been teaching for years to help students understand how the North and South viewed the issue of slavery differently.

What Hope’s critics have failed to realize is that in the digital age, children learn and understand concepts quite differently than a generation ago. To meet students where they are technologically, teachers must use interactive learning activities. That’s why we search for all types of activities that provide the most effective way to present information to our students. Hope Largent did exactly what we all try to do –– find ways to make learning meaningful and lasting. We support that with enthusiasm.

Lost in all the slander is the truth that Hope is a wonderful teacher. Watching her engage students with her interactive journals and lessons is exciting and inspiring.  Instead of relying on boring lessons straight out of textbooks, she looks for effective ways to keep her students interested. The Civil War and the role of slavery are important and sensitive topics. Not teaching them is not an option. What is optional is the energy and intelligence that a teacher can bring to those topics in pursuit of student understanding. Hope brings both in abundance.

In our interview, Largent spread out the simulation materials and detailed the process; students roll dice and move among stations in the classroom that simulate conditions slaves might encounter when they attempted to escape southern plantations to reach freedom in the north. The stations — marked by sheets of paper — are the northern border, the woods, a cabin, meet a stranger, an abolitionist’s house, working on the plantation and on the road. At each station, they roll again for their next stop.

Largent used the same project last year, and felt it helped her students understand the issues and “retain them for state testing in April.”

One of Bunch-Keemer’s accusations is that Largent told her granddaughter slaves were beaten when they were forced back to the plantation, but the teacher said, “I never talked about beatings. Never.”

However, the written introduction to the game does mention punishment: “Runaways often walked at night. Sometimes, they hid in carts driven by members of the Underground Railroad. Escaping took great courage. Runaways who were caught would be punished and returned to slavery.”

Overall, the activity struck me as a straightforward and sanitized way to teach young kids how the Underground Railroad worked and how hard it was for slaves to gain their freedom. The real question is whether it was the best way to teach those lessons.

Many experts caution against classroom simulations, although most of the discussion focuses on more sophisticated role-playing.  The Anti-Defamantion League has questioned Holocaust simulations in classrooms, including this one described on the group’s website:

A  Holocaust simulation activity at a Florida Middle School upset students, parents and community members by selecting children to be exposed to “persecution.” Without announcing or explaining the specific purpose of the activity in advance, eighth-grade students whose last names started with the letters L-Z were given yellow five-pointed stars and designated the “persecuted”, while their peers received “privileged” treatment. Throughout the activity the star-wearing students were subjected to enforced rules which ranged from forcing them to stand at the back of the class or the end of long lunch lines, to barring them from using some bathrooms and preventing them from using school drinking fountains. At the end of the day, many children were distressed, and one child even went home crying, telling his parents, “The only thing I found out today is that I don’t want to be Jewish.”

In its advice to teachers, the Southern Poverty Law Center says allowing students to assume the roles of other people and act out scenarios enables them gain deeper insight into historical events, but there are risks and dangers:

At any give time, simulations may be playing out in thousands of pre-K through 12 and college classrooms throughout the country. Topics are virtually unlimited, from slave ship experiences to the stock market before the Crash of 1929 to life under authoritarian regimes. Not all topics are controversial — the signing of the Declaration of Independence, for example. But other simulations are laden with inherent emotion and conflict, especially as they relate to race and ethnic identity…Educators who oppose the use of simulations for emotionally vulnerable subjects generally point to three main concerns: the effects of simulations on children’s psychological development, the ability of simulations to oversimplify history and oppression, and the fact that few teachers possess the appropriate training to facilitate simulations successfully.

I had a Twitter exchange with a teacher tonight who felt simulations or game-like approaches to slavery were wrong. “I’ve taught my own kids about slavery & didn’t need games. There are children’s’ books & movies,” she said.  It is not, she said, appropriate to make slavery or the Holocaust fun.

But teaching about slavery or the Holocaust through interactive activities isn’t about making these horrific historical facts “fun.” It’s about making them relatable to students. I never had an interactive activity in school; I just sat with the other 39 kids in my class, hands folded and listened. As the Cheatham Hill teachers said, I am not sure that works anymore.

 

Reader Comments 0

97 comments
Amy Haas
Amy Haas

As a teacher, I believe using simulations and interactive activities provides children with some of the most meaningful learning experiences. Although this is a sensitive topic, and one that should be handled with both care and intentionality, I feel like Largent provided her students with a meaningful learning experience that they will always remember.

When I was a student, I had a very similar, but much more intense, learning experience with the same topic; slavery. When I was in sixth grade I attended a camp called “Camp Joy”. During our stay at camp joy, there was a slavery activity which we were all required to participate. At the beginning of the simulation, we all laid face down in the grass as we were “auctioned”. After being auctioned, we would be tapped on the shoulder by the person who purchased us and then we had to follow them through the woods. We came to many stops during this experience; a house, an escape possibility, we had to do work, we were screamed at; it was extremely real and genuinely scary during some parts. We all had a blindfold around our neck during the simulation. If we got too scared or did not want to participate, we put our blindfolds around our heads, this indicated that we had “too much” and we could ask to be done. However, participating in this experience was extremely memorable and meaningful. Although this is a sensitive topic, learning about it in a way that was meaningful made me understand much more about it than I would have otherwise.

In the new age, technology is an important way to integrate meaningful learning experiences into the classroom. This teacher used her resources to create a real-life experience for the students. One that they will remember and appreciate later in life. One that actually teaches them the significance that the topics deserves. This teacher did a great job and should be celebrated for being courageous and for going outside of the box. Rather than just teaching from the book and allowing this subject to be one that students don’t remember or don’t care about.A 

JaninAtlanta
JaninAtlanta

I had a sinking sensation as I read the original news article as it appeared in the print edition last week: oh no; the age of microaggressions and trigger warnings have entered our public schools!  Now I've reread both longer articles--the one with the principal's letter and the one with the letter from the teacher educator Berchini, and the sinking sensation is worse.


The issue isn't that it was a game or a simulation but what exactly they did, which still isn't completely clear, at least it's not as clear as what happened in the Holocaust game that made a child cry and say she didn't want to be a Jew.  That is some profound learning!  The child realized something very bad was going on. No one would want to be if it involved being persecuted!  Now, if only that could have been talked about afterwards!


But the underground slavery simulation did not seem that intense.  Ms. Downey wrote in the article that the activity struck her as a straightforward and sanitized way to teach children about slavery and escape via the underground railroad.  Then she wrote that the remaining question was whether it was the best way to teach those subjects.  I propose that the 1st sentence was her answer.  The 2nd was her admission that she didn't know how doing so would be judged.


Look, forget the "game" part.  In this context that doesn't mean fun and games.  It was an experiential activity.  If the kids giggled during the activity, as the teacher educator was worried they might, that could have been discussed.  As to rolling the dice, that didn't refer to whether someone was a slave or not as Christina Berchini insinuated, but to whether at any point along the escape route one would be caught--conceivably a matter of chance.


The student said it wasn't the game, it was slavery.

What was to prevent that particular girl from complaining to the grandmother whether the simulation or some alternative didactic or discussion method was used?  What was to prevent this particular grandmother from being displeased with how the discussion was handled, whether or not the particular activity was used?

Slavery was terrible.  What good is teaching that doesn't get at that?  Why weren't the other students upset too?  Does permission need to be sought from parents before the lesson and trigger warnings given?

I regret that teachers are being put on the receiving end of this societal conflict.

I regret the judgmental attitude of the outside teacher expert and her willingness to be sure the teacher did wrong and convict her from afar, assuming that all the teaching colleagues of the teacher were white, or, whatever, were wrong.


Yes, she's an expert, but this is an area right now where experts may well disagree. 

I regret that despite her original opinion Ms. Downey joined the outside expert in deciding against the teacher.

I'm afraid what was learned by this teacher was to play it safe and keep your head down.

And with all this visited on her, how long do we think she's going to be teaching?



Stephanie Nation
Stephanie Nation

Why not just teach the truth it isn't a game to black people tell the truth

chipspeed
chipspeed

i get so tired of the africa american complaining about this stupid  stuff.  first off your own people in africa sold or traded u.  so the blame should be on them first.  if they hadnt sold or traded u you wont have been slaves here   but in your own country.  so get over it & move on.  plus it should be taught in school about how the slave trade first started & whom ever in africa had there hand in it. 

Stephanie Nation
Stephanie Nation

THE old white safe phrase first of all White America chose to buy humans rape, torture,kill another human treat them as property breed like cattle and the most despicable part of it is they used the bible to do it now tell the truth

keithbusting
keithbusting

The learning was made meaningful and lasting but not in the way this teacher intended. New technology is well and good however Miss Largent has to realize the taxpayers are the ones footing the bill for those interactive learning activities. I saw no place in this story that she or the Cobb County School System received a grant for this kind of teaching.

quickdigits
quickdigits

I am so sick and tired of hearing about how white people have to wear "kid gloves" around black people, so as to not Offend them in any way! Get over it....you want freedom? you want equality? Then get used to being treated the same way the rest of us are treated. The year is 2016.....political correctness is over and done with....so get used to it....

keithbusting
keithbusting

@quickdigits  What group of white people would tolerate their kids being educated in such a matter to the point where everything becomes a game? How about some specifics regarding the "same way the rest of us are treated? Political correctness is over and done with? Really, who signed that bill? And was it done on a federal, state or local level?

TeacherToo
TeacherToo

I want to clarify the last sentence: 


Maybe creating some ID cards of influential African Americans who were part of the Underground Railroad, or  people who were abolitionists, or people  who successfully navigated the U.R....may be a better way to approach this topic.

Brenda Kilpatrick Watkins
Brenda Kilpatrick Watkins

As a retired high school Spanish teacher, I have read this post and comments with interest. I taught over a forty-year span. From the beginning of my career to my retirement I noticed a marked difference in what students expected. Toward the end of my career, because of technology, children expected more hands-on, interactive, TPR (total physical response), etc. They were "bored" to just sit like sponges. I was not in this teacher's class room, but I do know from years of experience that what happens in the classroom and what gets heard at home can sometimes be quite different. I also know slavery is a challenging topic. Having prepared her lesson and taught this topic last year with no repercussions, I am certain she did not expect what has occurred. When I taught Spanish, I had a chapter on Mexican history. When Mexicans began to move to the area where I taught, I would ask for their input. I found that so many did not know their history. So many Americans are not knowledgeable of our own history. Since not many parents are teaching history to their children, it is the teacher's job to do just that. Perhaps if we supported each other more, rather than attacking one another, our Country - our world, would be a better place!

keithbusting
keithbusting

When the parents were in school, nobody taught them. As they grew up and moved into the workforce, challenges which faced them were putting food on the table and keeping a roof over their heads. The world sees what is going on in this country. They might look sideways at the American concept of making the world a better place.

Carlos_Castillo
Carlos_Castillo

The issue here is emotional, so replying with facts won't have much effect.


I suspect that so long as many African Americans feel that they are treated as second class citizens, particularly those who are older and remember the Jim Crow era, many will feel sensitive when the details of slavery are discussed in detail.  It diminishes their sense of safety, now.


That sensitivity will pass when most African Americans no longer feel they are treated differently.  My guess is that time won't arrive for a couple more generations -- about a century after passage of the Civil Right Act of 1964.

keithbusting
keithbusting

@Carlos_Castillo  The Civil Rights Act of 1964 like most legislation is only as good as the enforcement. Other than that they are mere words on paper.

Carlos_Castillo
Carlos_Castillo

@keithbusting @Carlos_Castillo The Act has been enforced, particularly in the areas of employment and voting.


Given that, I used 1964 as the starting line, so to speak, for the large numbers of African Americans who had left sharecropping in the deep south to migrate to cities from 1945 to 1970, the 2nd great migration -- which was much larger than the 1st, which went from 1900 to 1930.


Research, and there's not much of it, indicates that immigrants from the 1880-1920 great migration of Europeans to the US took about a about a century, on average, to match the income of the dominant groups already in the cities to which they migrated.  There's an urbanization process that every group goes through  accumulating the social, personal and political capital necessary to get ahead.


This is cold comfort to persons whose ancestors arrived in this country from 1619 through 1808 after surviving the middle passage from Africa to the east coast of North America to be sold as slaves once they arrived, stay enslaved for generation and were freed by the Civil War only to run into Jim Crow.  

If you think that this is all baloney, then ask yourself a) if Martin Luther King could have had the profound influence that he did if he had come from his grandfather's generation, before urban migration brought a critical mass of African Americans to the cities or b) if the Civil Rights Act of 1964 could have gotten past all those racist southern democrats without the great migrations?





Jazmin Corbell
Jazmin Corbell

They all went to all the stations...Each child rolled a dice.

POV1948
POV1948

Second guessed and demonized for trying a fresh approach to a difficult topic. Why do bright people go into education?

keithbusting
keithbusting

@POV1948  It would have behooved her to poll her class and get feedback from the parents before venturing to a difficult topic. Why do bright people go into education? A rhetorical question, yes but some hope to make a difference, some are gluttons for punishment.

dblackga
dblackga

@keithbusting @POV1948 Teaching by majority?  Oh, please.  Slavery IS a difficult topic -- that's why it is taught, to help children understand why it is such a flashpoint in history and why it still arouses so much passionate discourse. Should she ask permission to teach about the Holocaust? How about the use of the guillotine during the French Terror?  How about the Inquisition?  How about the building of the Pyramids?  How about the destruction of many of the indigenous Indian cultures in the Western hemisphere by the Europeans?  


The use of power, and the power wielded by conquerors has always been a subject of study.  One cannot whitewash it and minimize it and learn from it at the same time.  It was an interactive lesson plan that taught the students about the dangers inherent in escaping from slavery, and brought to light the bravery in the face of fear of so many of those slaves.  You can tell a child that "slavery was bad" and "slaves escaped from the South to the North", and it's just words.  Learning about the emotions behind these words in a controlled situation help make history live for these kids and create empathy.  Unfortunately, during this lesson, the students also learned that a lot of grown-ups are hypersensitive, judgmental and downright silly. 

jeffufl
jeffufl

Considering the grammatical issues in the 5 word sentence, I wouldn't give much credence to the comment!!

two cents worth
two cents worth

Solution to the problem of engaging teaching practices:  Read the chapter and answer the questions at the end of the chapter in complete sentences. Test on the chapter on Friday. 50% of semester grade. Do not talk or leave your seat. Shame on grandma.

Jazmin Corbell
Jazmin Corbell

All the kids played "the slave". Read the article. They rolled dice and each child went to each station, no matter their race.

Kathleen684
Kathleen684

I think what bothers me most about all this is the assumption by the teacher and some others that 10 year old students cannot be taught about these subjects and understand. I think that these people are greatly underestimating the capabilities of students of this age. If a teacher presents the material in ways that will engage and enlighten them, these youngsters will understand and learn. They do not have to play act or participate in a game in order to grasp these historical concepts and events.

jeffufl
jeffufl

I think what you're assuming is that kids today are like kids when you grew up. They have the attention span of a gnat sometimes. She did teach them.

bu22
bu22

@Kathleen684 It bothers me is the assumption by some that there is only one way to teach.

James Ninth Immortal Propane
James Ninth Immortal Propane

Fire that teacher. Slavery isn't a game. This is insensitive at best. I bet the white students felt mighty superior when they kept sending the one black student who was forced to play the slave back to the plantation.

CraiginSmyrna
CraiginSmyrna

What an ignorant dumbass statement but one to be expected with a name like yours. 

RTPIV
RTPIV

Read the article. There was diverse class of 23 with 4 black students, white and Hispanic students.

Ryan Mclean
Ryan Mclean

seek help for your chip on your shouder

quickdigits
quickdigits

You need to get over it and start living in this cold cruel world just like the rest of us do!

Bncholland
Bncholland

Read the article. Most all the kids visited most of the 6 spots. She was on of the kids who found freedom.

ScooterKelley
ScooterKelley

Another idiot that didn't read the entire article. You are just like the grandmother trying to spread false truths.

keithbusting
keithbusting

As long as it is not embedded in his skin, he's alright.

dblackga
dblackga

Slavery isn't a game. NOTHING is history was "a game."  Neither was World War I or World War II.  Or the Holocaust.  Guess we better wipe those topics from the curriculum.  What in the heck do you expect a teacher to teach? 

Wascatlady
Wascatlady

I got in trouble one year when I taught kindergarten for teaching about dinosaurs.  I was dumbfounded!  My principal stood up for me, and only told me about the complaint months later. (This was before kindergarten became so circumscribed and prescribed and jack-booted.)  It was a "religious" issue to the parent.


I know that in this day and age there are so many ways a teacher can run afoul of community expectations.  You have to be a Solomon to navigate the minefields.


I went with my younger daughter to see the Titanic exhibit when it was in Galveston.  I have to admit my feelings were a little hurt when I found out we had both died on the ship.  I can understand very sensitive children, white, black, or whatever, getting a little upset with a role-playing exercise like this one on slavery.  It might be a good way to teach about it, but perhaps not with this particular student.  I don't think it should rise to the point of an uproar, however.  If my child were upset by it, I would let the teacher know it seemed too strong for him/her, AND THEN I WOULD CONSIDER IT CLOSED.  No need to involve the principal, BOE, and media.  


Twice in my teaching career I had parents come to me to complain about something.  Both times I listened carefully, heard their concern, and considered it a learning experience for me--they let me in on something I did not know that had an effect on their child in a way that was concerning, and I needed to know.

newsphile
newsphile

@Wascatlady You describe an effective, common sense approach.  Sadly, common sense isn't so common anymore.

heyteacher
heyteacher

@Wascatlady Totally agree. I was dumbfounded when one of my students refused to read The Red Badge of Courage because of the Yankee perspective. Met with the parents and tried really hard to listen to their concerns and finally agreed on an alternative novel (Huck Finn -- which has been banned in some districts but that's another topic). It's so important to really hear the concerns of the parents, even if that concern seems ridiculous to us. 


That said, what could this teacher have done to make the lesson more engaging? I don't see a lot of alternative strategies suggested --most posters are suggesting merely  to "make the lesson engaging". How?  I did some quick searches and did not find very many stories about slavery written for this age group -- there's only so much lecturing that a fifth grader can handle (death by powerpoint anyone?). 

Vernell Campbell
Vernell Campbell

Unbelievable wow crazy and despite to think this has moved into the classroom.

MickiM
MickiM

The atrocities of the past (and the present) should not be presented in role-playing or game format. It actually is not giving a true representation of events. This may be why many of them cannot appreciate the inhumanness of slavery.  Some people keep trying to make an unpalatable time in history palatable and I really don't think it is for the benefit of the students. You can still teach history to young people of every age level by giving them the facts. 

LetsBeLogical
LetsBeLogical

Having followed this story since last Friday when it was first aired on a local news agency in Atlanta, I have concluded that Delores Bunch-Keemer was most likely less interested in providing feedback for positive change and was more interested in publicizing her beliefs on African American issues in the United States.It was less than 48 hours from the time the student activity took place to the time the news was aired.To me, this is not a timeline commensurate with someone trying to educate the faculty about potential emotional stress resulting from the activity and either looking to improve the activity or for an alternate activity that would provide the same engagement levels and understanding of the subject.I believe if Ms. Bunch-Keemer had approached the faculty with this intent, a special PTA meeting would have been called to address the subject and all affected would have been better off.Additionally, while reading and watching the various news stories, I picked up on a statement that the student was anxious to tell her grandmother because she knew her grandmother would be upset.This begs the question; was the student uncomfortable with the activity or because she knew her grandmother would be upset by the activity?I’m sure Ms. Bunch-Keemer is probably a wonderful person and only wishes the best for her family and friends.I see that within the interviews associated to this story.However, her views, at least those posted on Facebook, and actions appear to be producing the opposite results.

MickiM
MickiM

@LetsBeLogical  If my child came home and told me that her school played a slave game, I would be VERY upset. And she stated that when she spoke to the teacher, the teacher responded by saying no one else had complained about the game. If you have a parent that come to you and expressed her displeasure, then you should have been more sympathetic and responsive.And she never said her grandchild was the only AA or POC student, she stated that she was the only AA female student. If you are really trying to bridge the gap to racial harmony, ignoring the concerns of the parent (who is more than likely a descendant of slaves) is not the way. Hopefully, we all learned a lesson. 


CraiginSmyrna
CraiginSmyrna

@MickiM @LetsBeLogical Given that attitudes from "POC"  are always looking for something to be offended by,  Im guessing that "bridging the gap to racial harmony" is not something possible given those hypersensitivities. 

Max Brill
Max Brill

Teach slavery with just the facts, is this so hard?

CraiginSmyrna
CraiginSmyrna

I agree but facts change depending on who your talking to

JD Waldrep
JD Waldrep

Good Lord... The "butt hurt" level is completely off the charts with this one...

sold1000
sold1000

But the principal never mentioned that there were those who called to express their displeasure...only that people called to support the game.  Did I mention that Georgia is near the bottom for education.  

LetsBeLogical
LetsBeLogical

@sold1000  As a parent of a child at Cheatham Hill, I have only heard of a few people who have complained compared to the many dozens who have shown support and/or been willing to talk through the complaint to determine what is best for all of the children attending the school.