Before we create Opportunity School District, create opportunities for teachers to lead

A south Georgia grand jury indicts a sheriff and two deputies related to alleged abuses during a schoolwide pat-down in Worth County.

Here is a thoughtful piece by a DeKalb teacher on why she believes the Opportunity School District is a mistake.

Cross Keys High School teacher Rebekah Morris says the unrelenting pressure in “failing” schools to document improvement efforts creates an environment where teaching and learning are diminished. The OSD will only worsen that pressure, she says, and lead to less creative schools where teaching becomes scripted and lifeless.

Along with teaching, Morris works with Thrive Youth Development, Inc., a nonprofit that seeks to transform communities in Metro Atlanta by teaching leadership and life skills to middle school and high school students. She also sits on the advisory board for Presencia, Inc., a nonprofit on Buford Highway providing economic, educational and social support to refugees and immigrants through after-school programs, job creation, and leadership development. This piece originally appeared on her Georgian Educator blog. (This version has been edited a bit.)

By Rebekah Morris

I am one of those strange teachers that didn’t immediately balk at the idea of the Opportunity School District. I’ve been to schools where the school building is failing structurally, the academics are languishing miserably, and the community is disenfranchised in every way. I’ve thought, “There is no way that having the government take over a place like this could be any worse for a kid.”

You all probably know the kinds of schools I’m talking about. The schools that would be taken over by the government would be the lowest schools. Under this proposed amendment, the newly created Opportunity School District, headed by an independent superintendent, answerable only to the governor, would be able to take over the lowest 20 schools in any given year (for a period of at least 5 but no more than 10 years). The OSD would never comprise more than 100 schools at any given time.

I can imagine there are at least 100 school communities suffering under the current educational atmosphere. I just happen to think there are better ways to address their problems.

Does State Takeover Equal Good Teaching?

The targeted school communities on the “list” of schools eligible to be taken over are schools where the majority of their students are in poverty. Poverty, as we all know, wreaks unimaginable havoc on a student’s life and on a school community. Taking the school by force will not immediately change the socioeconomic situation of the school’s community.

However, I also recognize that good teaching can make all the difference in a child’s academic performance. Give a good teacher to students living in poverty, and studies show those students will improve, compared to similar students who get stuck with a bad teacher. Of all the tools that reformers have at their disposal, teaching has the single greatest impact on student achievement.

So how can we get good teaching to occur?

For the sake of argument, let’s pretend the reason the students in these targeted schools are “failing” is because they have bad teachers and administrators. Proponents of the OSD believe removing the assumed “bad” teachers and administrators from a low-performing school will improve student performance, but this isn’t addressing some key issues.

One of those issues is teacher retention, both at low-income schools and in the teaching profession as a whole. The architects of the OSD assume they will be able to magically attract the “right” teachers to teach in some of the places with the worst reputations (whether rightfully or wrongfully gained). How do they plan to do this? Yes, schools like KIPP attract some of the best and the brightest. However, there are no guarantees schools within the OSD will have successful, nonprofit charter school management.

Invest in Holistic Education

And, for the sake of argument, let’s pretend there is good teaching happening at these schools. Many of the issues interfering with student success include the social, physical, mental, and psychological problems endemic to poverty. Now schools are underfunded in the areas of social workers, psychologists, nurses, music and art programs, after-school programs – and the list goes on. Instead of changing the management at these schools, perhaps what needs to happen is a major revamping of the current QBE funding formula for schools (one that involves more money spent in the classroom and less on overhead bureaucracy).

Schools that are successful with students living in poverty have these “wrap-around services” that address the whole child. Instead of changing the school personnel, give us the right personnel and the right amount of money to hire these key individuals.

At schools that become a part of the OSD, up to 3% of their allotted budget can be used to “cover administrative costs” for the OSD. These dollars (and other QBE dollars) should be spent on increased teacher salaries for teachers who teach in these “failing” schools. These dollars should be spent on improved, ongoing teacher training programs (like ones mentioned in “Building a Better Teacher” by Elizabeth Green or “The Teaching Gap” and “The Learning Gap” by James W. Stigler and James Hiebert). These dollars should be spent on books for every classroom, nurses for every school, adequate technology for every building, decent facilities for every community, and sufficient social services for every struggling student.

The lack of the above-mentioned items is why many schools are failing. The schools marked as “failing” are, in many ways, indicators of where we as a society have failed our schools. We spend millions of public dollars on sports stadiums, economic tax breaks for corporations, and bloated bureaucratic nonsense.

We need to spend our public dollars in a way that invests in our communities – especially the communities where parents lack the means to buy computers for their students, or pay for their children to see therapists, or donate huge sums for a new gymnasium. If you’re thinking these lower-income schools get additional funds from the federal government under Title I, please know the funds cannot cover all of these important areas. Not even close. (And I’ve taught at Title 1 schools for six years.)

OSD Encourages Innovation? Not Exactly.

The last point I want to explore is the claim that the very threat of the OSD provides political cover for superintendents to accomplish innovative ideas within their school districts. As a teacher who loves to work hard to get kids to succeed, I am not normally one to complain about doing a little extra work. However, I have to say the threat of the OSD taking over my school has been almost unbearable for many teachers – myself included.

Because our school is on the potential OSD “list,” we have had an enormous amount of work piled onto us to satisfy our current district and ultimately the state to show we are “doing enough” to address our low graduation rate and “failure” status. Many of the mandates have been positive for our school (i.e. collaborative planning, professional reading, writing lesson plans). On the other hand, many have been stifling – for both teachers and administrators.

When your school is “on the list,” it’s not enough if teachers are collaborating to develop rigorous lessons and tests. We have to document we are doing so by filling out a two-page form every week. It’s not enough to write a lesson plan. We have to write a 10-15 page lesson plan every week detailing every way we are teaching every single standard for every single day. It’s not enough we are trying to differentiate for every single student. We have to document we are doing differentiation for every single student. This includes one to two pages per student documenting student weaknesses, strengths, parent contact logs, deficiency notices, response-to-intervention sheets, data team documentation, etc, etc. (I’m sure I’ve forgotten some, too.)

And then you have to call all the parents, grade all the papers, create the innovative lesson plans, and support or sponsor student clubs and athletics.

And maybe raise your own children. Or sleep. Or eat.

Many teachers – myself included – have been doing these things all along, but because we are “on the list,” we have the additional burden of having to explain and show every single way we are doing every single thing. Administrators feel this pressure, the district feels this pressure, and the teachers feel this pressure.

Because of this, morale is generally low in schools targeted for takeover. There is little energy to try to “think outside the box,” or take on additional programs or activities. There is also little incentive from the state or the district – unless it’s quantifiable on a form. For many new teachers, the stress is overwhelming.

The students are the ones who really lose because their classes aren’t as innovative, creative, or exploratory as they could be. If your students aren’t performing well or aren’t graduating, perhaps they need — more than ever — for school to be engaging and rigorous. Think of schools like Paideia, the Avondale Museum School, Wesleyan School, Woodward Academy, or any school with project-based learning models or rigorous STEM programs. Teachers and students are dying to get into these kinds of schools. Not ones overflowing with documentation and paperwork.

So when I think about the OSD passing, I cringe. I can’t imagine years of this. I can’t imagine hordes of talented teachers choosing to teach at schools that are under such scrutiny, that limit their ability to teach creatively. I fear the OSD will only create more schools that will continue to hemorrhage talented teachers and students who will wish to escape the culture of test prep and paperwork.

As you think through the various arguments in support of the Opportunity School District, I hope you consider all sides of the argument. I don’t think proponents of the OSD are trying to harm public education. I’m just not sure they have thought through all the alternatives and all the ramifications.

I recommend you vote “NO” on Amendment 1 (which favors the OSD).

 

Reader Comments 0

101 comments
irishmafia1457
irishmafia1457

Unless parents make education priority #1 to their children, the money, the politics, the never ending "new" programs, are all moot !

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

There is naïveté plus judgment in your comments, as well as latent racism.

JKonop
JKonop

One of the problems with the bill is we have two types of school districts in our state. We have very good schools in places like North Fulton, Cherokee, East Cobb, West Cob......we have very bad schools in other districts! A smart compromise would of been to judge the system not school by school. If a district has 75 percent of the schools performing the law should not apply. Also we should change the grading system factoring in the amount of at risk students at each school.




AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@JKonop We have children that make failing scores on tests in ALL schools. The so called "failing" schools simply have a greater number of students who fail the tests. If the school is the problem, simply add on space to the the "good" school and bus the children and reassign the teachers to the "good" school. Problem solved right?

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

The Current state run school system, The State Charter Commission Schools School System (SCSCSS) will be able to take over schools under the OSD. 


Most of the SCSCSS schools are failing or close to it. They do not seem know how to turn around their own failing schools.


They do not make public their salaries, names of personnel, or vendor payments (all REAL public schools do this - this is one of the things that makes REAL public schools public). All OSD supporters seem to ignore or condone this secret spending and hiring/pay structure.


They make new rules that allow failing charter schools to escape/change their charter contract(to keep from being shut down?)


They have an online high school with 1,500 students and a 7.7% graduation rate. They have an estimated $9 million budget. This equates to a cost of $78,000 dollars per graduate. There seems to be poor info/confusion about what is counted as attendance at this online school, how many employees they have, and which vendors are making money off the school.


This has been going on for years. Why would we not think that the OSD would be run in this same manner?

jarvis1975
jarvis1975

Giving large government the authority to take anything away from legally elected officials is Liberalism. If as Republicans you don't see that, you don't even understand the ideology you claim to support. 

The answer to a small government problem is not, nor will it ever be, to give the problem to a larger form of government.


Tearing a hole in our state's constitution allowing the State to take over anything they were directly forbidden to touch is an abandonment of liberty, and some of you are willfully supporting it.

daks_
daks_

An Education Next poll in September found that blacks back charter schools by nearly two-to-one. Two thirds of blacks also favor tax-credit scholarship programs such as Florida's. Only 8% of blacks give their local public schools an A grade.

Against black parents frustrated by the status quo are the teachers' unions and union political donations to Democrats willing to turn away from education reform.


Astropig
Astropig

@daks_


True,but none of that will matter to the unionistas that see a threat to whatever endangers their little kingdom.How the current system is different from Jim Crow,I can't discern.

jarvis1975
jarvis1975

@Astropig @daks_ Obviously the only way to level the playing field is for centralized government intervention. Big Brother's oversight is the solution to all wrongs.

redweather
redweather

AvgGeorgian has been beating the drum pretty loud for the proposition that the OSD is destined to replicate the poor performance of  the State Charter Schools Commission School District.  So I visited the Governor's Office of Student Achievement website and looked at the state's charters schools for myself.


AvgGeorgian makes a very good point. The "grades" most charter schools receive are appallingly low.  Most schools are in the "D" and "F" categories. Those are the facts, folks.

Astropig
Astropig

@redweather


Below Average is fighting the last battle:The charter Amendment.He/she is still sore that it passed.That's obvious.


Get over it already.

EdJohnson
EdJohnson

@redweather @Astropig Just know The Astropig's challenge with reading comprehension flares up now and them.  So when he misses the point or just doesn't get it, well, let's just send a bit of empathy his way.

CSpinks
CSpinks

How anyone who is familiar with any of the self-serving boards of education in our state could argue against any effort to change the public school systems which they operate and which pretend to help our kids is beyond me?

Astropig
Astropig

@CSpinks


The school boards are the crux of the problem.The zealots that create the strawman "blame the teacher" lie are strangely silent on the school boards that have allowed these schools to descend to this condition.


The governor has emphatically NOT blamed teachers for anything.He has pointed out that the system that allows these schools to go on year after year with terrible results is to blame and needs change and improvement.With superintendents having lots of mobility (they just trade relatively high paying jobs with one another),the one constant in these schools is the school boards.The terrible members are just an update of the old days,where the local "Boss Hog" controlled everything to benefit himself and his cronies.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@Astropig @CSpinks Other unfortunate constants include the Georgia School Board Association and the "professional" group representing our state's school board attorneys.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

Bottom Line-The OSD will give the governor Carte Blanche to hand over $millions of dollars of state and local school tax money to charter profiteers.


The school district that was created with the last amendment, The State Charter Schools Commission School District is a chronically failing school system with a high school graduation rate of 7.7%. It is a black hole as far as finding out salaries and vendor payments. None of its schools are on the takeover list. Why?

Starik
Starik

@AvgGeorgian Some kids can't be educated due to various disabilities; including family and culture. Unless you have dealt with very poor people you have no idea.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@Starik @AvgGeorgian 

I understand the probable effect of these factors on academic progress and do not disparage the students.


My focus is on the state run failing school that spends $millions with no financial or academic accountability. Why are the programs not working, what are the programs, who is making money off the school, who runs the school, how many employees does the school have, is there any accountability for attendance, is the school using this vulnerable population as a cash cow while offering an inferior education? We can't tell because all of this is hidden from the public. Why do state run charter schools hide all this from the taxpayer?



RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

I'm done.


BOTTOM LINE- opponents see this as a political fight with Atlanta, opponents are trying to help the real victims of failing schools, mostly urban blacks and rural whites and blacks. 


Some of you people need to think about the children, locked into a long-term pattern of poverty without a decent education.

jezel-dog / Coach - me
jezel-dog / Coach - me

@RoyalDawg I understood you to say that you are a volunteer in the school system. If you study the history of education you may not be so disheartened.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@jezel @RoyalDawg


Your own charter school seems to hide salaries and vendor payments from you as a taxpayer and proud parent. How much  of that money is going to political donors that could be going to your child's classroom. Is you school full of those poor minority students you talk about who were failing their tests at their prior school partly due to extreme poverty, lack of parental guidance and support, behavioral problems, lack of attendance, and moderate to severe disabilities?

I'm gonna guess not. Throw your school stats up and let us discuss it.

CSpinks
CSpinks

@RoyalDawg In the second line of your second paragraph, didn't you mean "proponents" rather than "opponents?"

Selina Gardner
Selina Gardner

Nobody cares what teachers think, regardless of the hours we put into it. Educrats want to micromanage all the innovation out of the system so they can run schools like assembly lines.

daks_
daks_

This article re-hashes all the stale old teachers' union arguments for the status quo and against reform.

But parents have had it with excuses and want real change.

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@daks_ The opposition is cut-and-pasted from the anti-charter campaign. 


It will win because to the opponents it is political, to parents and other supporters, it is about what is best for the children.

sneakpeakintoeducation
sneakpeakintoeducation

@RoyalDawg @daks_


Oh, yes. The old "it's for the children" argument. Designed specifically to pull the heartstrings. Truth is this amendment is not about helping children but it is about helping to put tax-payer's money in the direction of a failed policy to help enrich the charter industry's coffers. Vote NO in NOvember.

jarvis1975
jarvis1975

Giving additional power to a larger, more-centralized government is rarely the solution.


I don't understand how any 'Conservative' could vote for this amendment.

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@jarvis1975 Because the focus is on the child, not teachers, administrators and inadequate local boards. It isn't that hard.

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@jarvis1975 @RoyalDawg Nothing, unless the local jurisdiction has failed miserably at something else.


"Local control" is not inherently a virtue, and the schools are not 100% locally controlled. They are county or city operated, so maybe local neighborhoods should be running each school?


When Dekalb County, for example, runs schools, they darn sure aren't truly "local".

tinala
tinala

Please don't vote for Opportunity School' District; because, Deal wants to line the pockers of his friends who are vendors for this school district. Teacher's need better resources, more funding and smaller class sizes of students. No one can adequately teach with 25/ 30 children in a classroom.

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@tinala That's propaganda. If you believe it, someone has filled you with lies and you were gullible enough to believe it.


The same was said about charter schools- name ONE "vendor friend" who has profited!

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@RoyalDawg @tinala


The State Charter School Commission School District hides all spending and hiring from the taxpayer so you CAN'T see who profits.


Real public schools post these documents online.


Wake up and educate yourself about how the state already runs its own chronically failing school district.


RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@AvgGeorgian @RoyalDawg @tinala I assume that you are not a liar, so you are obviously ignorant. You know not of what you speak. You are simply WRONG.


Have you been to a commission meeting or visited the offices? Your statements suggest not.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@RoyalDawg @AvgGeorgian @tinala


Here is item 11 from the September board meeting that allows charter schools to fail, not meet their charter goals, and still stay in business.


"11. Chairman Rippner then requested that Mr. Stevens provide an update on SCSC process items. Mr. Stevens presented an item to authorize the SCSC Chairperson the authority to execute charter contract amendments for schools requesting to incorporate the Comprehensive Performance Framework (CPF) as their measure of accoubtability. Commissioner Lowden made a motion to approve the amendment and Commissioner Lewis provided a second. There was no discussion, and the amendment was unanimously approved by those present."


https://scsc.georgia.gov/sites/scsc.georgia.gov/files/related_files/site_page/Meeting Minutes September 2016.pdf

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@AvgGeorgian @RoyalDawg @tinala Again, ignorance on parade. The state has changed its testing practices since some schools originally received their charters. The new  Comprehensive Performance Framework (CPF) does NOT lower standards, it simply adjusts those standards to testing required by the state so as to avoid additional administrative burdens.


The new  Comprehensive Performance Framework (CPF) does not " allow charter schools to fail, not meet their charter goals, and still stay in business."


What is your personal interest in keeping these poor, minority students in failing schools? Are you one of the failing administrators or board members? Or perhaps one of the rare lazy teachers who fears accountability? Are you a local vendor profiting from the status quo? Or perhaps just a racist (sorry, that's a Democrat  tool)?


Pull your skirt down, I can see your ignorance.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@RoyalDawg @AvgGeorgian @tinala

You do not understand the CPF. It allows failing charter schools to opt out (escape) their charter contract so they won't be closed. They do not have to choose that. They could choose to remain in their contract.


You have no defense for the SCSC Graduation High School that has been failing for 6 years with a 7.7% grad rate.


You cannot even find the salaries and vendor payments for your own charter school.


My interest in this is to understand the truth about issues. The republicans happen to be in power now. i will do the same thing when the democrats are in power.


Go look at Lake Oconee Charter Academy and see how many poor minority students are in that school. Check the school demographics against the county demographics. Try to find out how much the principal makes.


You seem to do almost no reading or researching. I have an opinion for about every 5000 words I read. You - not so much.


Starik
Starik

@AvgGeorgian @RoyalDawg @tinala Look up the school. The school accepts students the public schools won't; it's a last chance school, and a 7% graduation may be justified.


I wonder what the graduation rate is in youth prisons?

EdJohnson
EdJohnson

@RoyalDawg "name ONE 'vendor friend' who has profited!" my foot.  The onus is still on you to name one, just one chronically failing school.  Still waiting.  So come on, name it!!

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@AvgGeorgian @RoyalDawg @tinala

You do not understand the CPF. It allows failing charter schools to opt out (escape) their charter contract so they won't be closed. They do not have to choose that. They could choose to remain in their contract.

YOU HAVE NO IDEA JUST HOW MUCH I DO UNDERSTAND THE CPF. YOU WOULD ALREADY KNOW THIS IF YOU WERE INVOLVED AND NOT JUST A SELF-APPOINTED CRITIC. I REPEAT FOR THE COMPREHENSION CHALLENGED. “Again, ignorance on parade. The state has changed its testing practices since some schools originally received their charters. The new  Comprehensive Performance Framework (CPF) does NOT lower standards, it simply adjusts those standards to testing required by the state so as to avoid additional administrative burdens.

The new Comprehensive Performance Framework (CPF) does not " allow charter schools to fail, not meet their charter goals, and still stay in business."

You have no defense for the SCSC Graduation High School that has been failing for 6 years with a 7.7% grad rate.

I REPEAT. “The SCSC is managing, for the most part, schools chartered by the first commission or the State BOE before their formation. Without a proper vetting process, many of those schools should never have received a charter, and without a reversal of performance, many will be closed when their current charter expires. There are no failing schools approved AFTER the Constitutional Amendment.

So while you are not 100% wrong, your statement is misleading without proper context.”

You cannot even find the salaries and vendor payments for your own charter school.

YOU MAY HAVE ME THERE.

My interest in this is to understand the truth about issues. The republicans happen to be in power now. i will do the same thing when the democrats are in power.

Go look at Lake Oconee Charter Academy and see how many poor minority students are in that school. Check the school demographics against the county demographics. Try to find out how much the principal makes.

OCONEE CHARTER ACADEMY IS A LOCAL CHARTER, IF I AM NOT MISTAKEN. EVEN IF YOU ARE CORRECT, THERE ARE SOME SCHOOLS WHO ARE LITERALLY 100% MINORITY. IN THE AGGREGATE, THE CHARTERS ARE OVERWHELMINGLY- AS IN > 90%- MINORITY.

You seem to do almost no reading or researching. I have an opinion for about every 5000 words I read. You - not so much.

IF YOU KNEW WHO YOU WERE TALKING TO YOU WOULDN’T BE SO BOLD.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@RoyalDawg @AvgGeorgian

Thank you for the thoughtful point by point response. Good communication on the issues is what I strive for on blogs.

The CPF. You and I disagree on this. “For purposes of upcoming SCSC charter renewals, all state charter schools with existing charter contracts will be allowed to choose whether they wish to be evaluated by the terms of the current contracts (performance goals) OR whether they wish to be evaluated in accordance with the new comprehensive performance framework.  The framework will likely be an attractive option for many schools since it incorporates a wider variety of measures (including a greater emphasis on growth and value-added impact on student achievement) than current SCSC charter contracts” Why is this attractive if not to make it easier to “pass”? If CPF is a good model, why not apply it to schools on the OSD takeover list? The CPF IS difficult to understand (purposefully?) and I have not spent a great amt. of time unravelling it. I am open to explanation and correction on this point.

Hidden spending for all SCCS schools. We agree. There is no financial accountability to the taxpayer. I just don’t see how anyone can defend this. All REAL PUBLIC schools post this.

Lake Oconee Academy IS a local charter. It is simply an example of how easy it is to create a charter school that is mostly white, with wealthier families, that screens out poorer families, minorities and SWD. This to counter the argument that charters give poor, failing, minority students, more choice.

“IF YOU KNEW WHO YOU WERE TALKING TO YOU WOULDN’T BE SO BOLD.” Is this a threat because I questioned the amount of research you put into your posted opinions?

This is what you said to me in your previous post “Are you one of the failing administrators or board members? Or perhaps one of the rare lazy teachers who fears accountability? Are you a local vendor profiting from the status quo? Or perhaps just a racist (sorry, that's a Democrat  tool)?

 So you can insinuate that that I am a failing administrator /board member, lazy teacher, profiteer, or racist but I dare not accuse you of lack of conscientious research on the topic because of WHO YOU ARE?


OdessaHooker
OdessaHooker

What a brave teacher! I agree entirely. It would b a privilege to lend my experience to needy students. My experience ranges from Head Start to the University of Cincinnati. As a solo mom of five children for 47 years, their success is  are impressive: First African American  Ex. Director of ARC, a professor  at Notre Dame Univ., a PhD student at Claremont Grad. Univ. CA, an employee at Georgia State, and a restaurant manager. I worked 31 years in public school in Cincinnati and 13 years in private school. In fact, I moved to Atlanta to prepare two of my great-grand children for school. 

Since retirement, I've written five books, three of them recording the history of my role-model young parents who prepared us for a legacy of education. 

FrankStuff
FrankStuff

Georgia already has an abysmal record of operating the State Charter Schools. Most, by Georgia's own measure, are rated as D or F.


Why then, given Georgia's failing State Charter School track record, should failing schools be turned over to the state, or the state's proxy charter school management firms?


Charter schools are still public schools and generally perform no better and no worse.


Who aside from Georgia's Governor and their "appointed" superintendent, will hold school leadership accountable?

RoyalDawg
RoyalDawg

@FrankStuff You are partially correct, but largely uninformed. The SCSC is managing, for the most part, schools chartered by the first commission or the State BOE before their formation. Without a proper vetting process, many of those schools should never have received a charter, and without a reversal of performance, many will be closed when their current charter expires. There are no failing schools approved AFTER the Constitutional Amendment.


So while you are not 100% wrong, your statement is misleading without proper context.


A proud Charter parent.

AvgGeorgian
AvgGeorgian

@RoyalDawg @FrankStuff

Royal Dawg, if your school is a SCSC school, please post the site that has all salaries and vendor payments for your school, you know, like a real public school does.