Newly released state grades for schools show steep decline at elementary level

The Georgia Department of Education today released the College and Career Ready Performance Index, based on data from the 2015-16 school year. These state-generated grades for schools – presented on a 100-point scale — depend on several factors, but are largely fed by test scores.

The state score for Georgia’s elementary schools was 71.7, with a score of 71.5 for middle schools, 75.7 for high schools, and an overall statewide score of 73.6. Because we still haven’t validated our new Georgia Milestones tests — meaning we have not ascertained just how good a judge of student learning the Milestones are — I believe these scores ought to be viewed with some reservations.

The average state score for Georgia’s elementary schools was 71.7,  71.5 for middle schools, and 75.7 for high schools, and an overall statewide score of 73.6.

 

 

As the DOE explains it: The CCRPI includes four main components: Achievement, Progress, Achievement Gap, and Challenge Points. These components, encompassing multiple indicators, are combined for a total CCRPI score on a scale of 0 to 100, with a possibility of 10 additional points. The CCRPI also reports other information, such as the performance of student subgroups, school climate, and financial efficiency status.

Here is what DOE says:

The CCRPI is Georgia’s statewide accountability system, implemented in 2012 to replace No Child Left Behind’s Adequate Yearly Progress measurement, after the U.S. Department of Education granted Georgia’s waiver from NCLB. It measures schools and school districts on a 100-point scale based on multiple indicators of performance.

 

State 2015 2016
Elementary Schools 76 71.7
Middle Schools 71.2 71.5
High Schools 75.8 75.7
All Schools 75.5 73.6

A significant year-to-year decrease was seen in the elementary school score, mostly due to bonus point opportunities not being met for Economically Disadvantaged students, English Learners, and Students with Disabilities. Each year, schools can earn extra points if those student groups are meeting performance targets. From the 2015 to 2016 school year, annually increasing targets were not met for these elementary student groups, even though subgroup performance increased in math, science, and social studies.

“These results point to the need for continued intensive focus on the foundations in early grades,” State School Superintendent Richard Woods said. “However, I don’t believe the CCRPI captures all the great work happening in our schools. We have seen improvements and, in some cases, record results on the ACT, SAT, and in graduation rates. Through the process of developing Georgia’s state plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act, we are evaluating what changes should be made to our accountability system to better measure the overall achievements of our schools.”

The GaDOE also released Student Growth Model data for 2015-16. This is a metric designed to help educators, parents, and other stakeholders better understand and analyze the progress students make year to year. It provides a deeper look at student growth by school and school district, providing answers to questions such as, “Did students in this school grow more or less than academically similar students across the state?” or “Are students growing as much in math as in English Language Arts?” (Here is a link to the DOE tool to examine growth.)

2016 CCRPI Data Files

CCRPI Scoring by Component

CCRPI Achievement Indicators Data

EOG and EOC Data By Subgroup

Cohort Graduation Rate Data by Subgroup

2015 CCRPI data files can be found here.

 

 

Reader Comments 0

15 comments
Charlotte Manning Harrell
Charlotte Manning Harrell

I think teachers and administrators also learned that if they help the students cheat, there will be consequences. Test scores often decline when new testing instruments are introduced.

newsphile
newsphile

It's important to note that while averaged state-wide scores decreased in elementary schools, some district-wide averaged scores within the state increased. 

BDKMBISH
BDKMBISH

Isnt it lovely that the State disqualified the use of the Milestones scores for promotion/retention of students and for the evaluation of teachers because the data is flawed but yet it is good enough to use to grade the schools.


Pelosied
Pelosied

Let's face up to the fact that children growing up without a father in the home are far more likely to be on the wrong side of these scores.

And that 3 out of 4 black children are in that situation.

Starik
Starik

@Pelosied Many of these kids do have a father in the home - their brothers and sisters have fathers. They are biologically necessary. If they're lucky, in addition to mama they have a play-mama, who will take of them when their real mama isn't around.

RolleTheorem
RolleTheorem


Those who voted for the rejection of the Opportunity School District amendment should be very proud of these developments. The education of Georgia's young people were never on the minds of these people. 

The successful effort to defeat OSD was to protect crony public school bureaucracies, corrupt school district architectures, and prop up incompetent teachers. Georgia has never had a problem building prisons, and I am sure it will not start now.


EdJohnson
EdJohnson

From AJC’s Georgia schools show little progress:

“The [CCRPI] report card is a complicated scheme with manifold parts, awarding points for everything from attendance rates to participation rates in accelerated classes like Advanced Placement. The most significant component, though, is student performance on state standardized tests, currently known as the Milestones.

GaDOE makes clear that norm-referenced test items are a Milestones “feature.”  As such, this necessarily means the Milestones are designed to achieve bell curve-like outcomes, with average scale scores centered around and near 500, and with higher SES test takers more toward the leading edge of a particular bell curve and lower SES test takers more toward the trailing edge of a particular bell curve.  To achieve the bell curve outcomes means the Milestones, by design, 1) include “field tested” test items higher SES test takers tend to get right and lower SES take takers tend to get wrong, and 2) exclude “field tested” test items higher SES test takers tend to get wrong and that lower SES test takers tend to get right.

For school board members and superintendents who do not understand this and are disinclined to look past CCRPI scores to underlying scale scores – for example, Atlanta’s, as they have shown – they are likely to over react and believe those who tell them elementary schools and lower SES students are failing when that may not be the case, at all.

Then ranking students and schools rather than using data to get blameless systemic knowledge about student learning, school performance, district performance, and state performance only leads to making matters worse, or so one may be lead to believe.  Ranking provides, at best, information and, at worse, disinformation.

rubykins7
rubykins7

Special Ed and ESOL students are given a modified curriculum during the school year, to try to meet them where they are, academically. Then, when test time rolls around, they are expected to take and PASS a test that is not in line with their modified curriculum but is based on the General Education curriculum. They are not going to pass and that is understandable to everyone except the people who make the test and calculate the scores. And the rub is that the teachers are held accountable when they don't pass. 


MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

Many children enter kindergarten or first grade several years behind their peers.

My words from the last thread should be considered here, also, perhaps, in order to solve this problem in elementary school:

"If our politicians in power had real compassion for these disenfranchised people and their children, as well as wisdom, they would be addressing problems in their neighborhoods instead of turning their schools into vehicles for profit."

Another comment
Another comment

If one can not teach their children the ABC's, the shapes, how to count to 100, Read "Good night Moon", " Sam I Am" or other classics to them on at least a weekly basis, by the time they start kindergarten in English. Given that we have had FREE Pre-K for 20 years in this state. Then they do not deserve to be a parent. Their parental rights should be terminated and those children should be put up for adoption. Not given to the dysfunctional family of origin that perpetuates this cycle of dysfunction.

Maybe Ben Carson will cut off the endless, lifetime limits on public housing and section 8 vouchers that enable.

Annette Laing
Annette Laing

What an astonishing coincidence that children should suddenly become dim, teachers incompetent, and all at a time when the State has been pushing to sell off our children to corporate charters... My.

Robert Muzzillo
Robert Muzzillo

Oh no! Time for teacher/public school shaming again.

Tom Green
Tom Green

It's all smoke and mirrors that can be changed behind the scenes to reflect whatever the DOE wants it to reflect. The total lack of transparency about year-to-year continuity totally invalidates any interpretation of results.