Congrats to students admitted today to Georgia Tech. You’re in good company.

An Atlanta lawmaker says our great campuses like Georgia Tech are not being served well by three pending bills in the General Assembly. (Photo: Georgia Tech.)

Hundreds of Georgia students found out today if they will be Yellow Jackets in the fall. Georgia Tech released its regular decision admits at noon.

Between the early action students who found out in January and today’s regular decision admits, 7,297 students were offered a slot at Georgia Tech this year. Georgia Tech saw a 3 percent increase in applications, for a total of 31,484.

The overall admit rate is 23 percent, meaning Tech admitted slightly more than two out of every 10 applicants. However, the admit rate is higher for Georgia applicants; 44 percent of in-state applicants earned admission.

The average ACT of a student admitted to Tech is 33. The highest ACT score possible is a 36. The average ACT score in Georgia is 21.1.

The average SAT of a student admitted to Tech is 1458, out of 1600. The average SAT score in Georgia is 976. The average number of college-level courses taken by admitted students is 10.6.

According to Tech:

This year’s admit pool includes students from all 50 states and Washington, D.C. The group is 42 percent female and 58 percent male. African-American and Hispanic students make up 15 percent of the pool, and first-generation college students make up 5 percent.

From Georgia, the admit pool represents 18 more Georgia high schools than last year and seven more counties (for a total of 101 counties). It also includes 300 more Georgia residents.

As interest in Tech continues to climb, so does the quality of the applicant pool. Rick Clark, director of Undergraduate Admission, has been at Tech for nearly 14 years and has seen a difference in recent applicants.

“More students seem to be applying who understand our motto of Progress and Service and mission of improving the human condition,” he said. “They appreciate who we are as an institution and want to be part of creating the next in their field, which is incredibly encouraging.”

This year, Undergraduate Admission also included faculty members from all six colleges in its committee reviews in both Early Action and Regular Decision rounds.

Looking back, the numbers for this admitted class are drastically different from what current Tech students may remember from when they applied. For fifth-year Tech students, they applied in a pool half the size — 14,711 — with an admit rate of 55 percent.

The issuing of admission decisions means the beginning of recruiting and yield season for Undergraduate Admission. It will host a series of Gold Carpet Days for admitted students to visit campus in March and April, so most Fridays the campus community will see a large influx of admitted students and families on campus.

“Recruiting the best possible class is a collective campus effort,” he said. “We hope people will congratulate these students and their families and be welcoming and friendly if they see guests on campus.” Students, faculty, and staff are also encouraged to follow and join the conversation among admitted students on social media using #gt21.

Beyond its regular yield efforts, Undergraduate Admission is looking forward to an active spring and summer. The team is working on creating a running tour of campus that is being piloted with high school admission counselors this month. It’s also implementing Slate, a software designed to enhance the experience for guests visiting campus for tours and information sessions, improve branding within recruitment communications, and help streamline file review for admission counselors by letting them read files more efficiently.

The final deadline in this year’s admission cycle is the deposit deadline of Monday, May 1.

Reader Comments 0

41 comments
MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

I believe the following video should be shared here in light of the comments below. This is a resource for teaching students how to embrace diversity in schools as an asset instead of as a liability.

https://youtu.be/GKYAt_1VUoY

Starik
Starik

@MaryElizabethSings @AlreadySheared @Starik Georgia Tech's mission is primarily to produce scientists and engineers. Of course Southern culture requires it to produce football and basketball teams for entertainment. The fewer special admissions the better.

Starik
Starik

@MaryElizabethSings Diversity is a mixed student body, and faculty and administration. Schools with a huge black majority are not diverse.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

The remarks, below, indicate stereotypical thinking, imo.  From my 35 years of teaching both black and white students, in equal numbers, which together numbered into the thousands of students in the course of my career, I will attest to the fact that the range from high to low achievement levels, per grade levels, of both races, was essentially the same.  


Of course there will be many black valedictorians from schools in the APS.  One of my own black students became a Harvard University graduate and earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering.  I could mention more examples of my students, both black and white, who were equally as successful as he.


Let us at least try not to think in stereotypical ways.  Let us attempt to seek truth, not simply easy generalities based upon 'common' thought.

Starik
Starik

@MaryElizabethSings The point isn't stereotypes. The point is racial segregation. Remember the central point of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education; segregated schools are inferior.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

I believe that Supreme Court decision was handed down over 60 years ago.

Again, we must free ourselves from preconceived ideas if we are to be truly a well-educated, literate, and compassionate nation of citizens.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Starik @MaryElizabethSings


That is simply stereotypical thinking that is unbecoming of you, Starik. 


The black high school in which I had taught in for 15 years was not "vastly inferior."  In fact, the student, whom I had mentioned earlier, who graduated from Harvard University and who became a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, had graduated from that same high school.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@Starik @MaryElizabethSings


I am in favor of inclusion of all people in this nation and throughout the world.  We are all equal because we are all children of God, as I see what we should be about creating spiritually, while we live.

Starik
Starik

@MaryElizabethSings @Starik I don't believe in God. I don't believe in universal equality, either. Half of us are below average. Many of us have genetic deficiencies that affect us profoundly, and many have cultural and environmental problems that prevent people from making the most of what they're born with.

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

You mean concepts based on hopes and platitudes rather than on reality.

That's the progressive way.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@BurroughstonBroch


No, I mean concepts based on depth of understanding. 


And, that is from me as an individual, not from me as any generalized label, such as a "progressive."

Starik
Starik

How many APS valedictorians were admitted, and who were they?

Starik
Starik

@ErnestB @Starik The numbers would suffice, I'm just curious as to how many there were, and whether they were Asian or Caucasoid. The AJC routinely prints photos and names of valedictorians.

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

APS enrollment is 74.4% black only this school year. Unless distorted by APS politics, you can bet the percentage of black only valedictorians will be less than 74.4%.

Starik
Starik

@BurroughstonBroch APS is, to a large degree segregated by race; how many valedictorians from all-black schools (or nearly so) can handle Georgia Tech? 

ErnestB
ErnestB

@Starik @BurroughstonBroch


Isn't that similar to asking how many valedictorians from rural and/or South Georgia schools can handle Georgia Tech?  This is more about providing a merit based opportunity for those that wish to accept it.  Is there anything wrong with that?

ErnestB
ErnestB

@Starik @ErnestB


You are probably already aware of this,


http://www.atlanta.k12.ga.us/Domain/8691


The scholarship is offered if the student meets the acceptance criteria.  Just because the scholarship is offered, it doesn't mean the student will accept it as they probably have multiple offers from other great schools.


We'll all find out where the APS valedictorians will attend when those articles come out close to graduation.



What is it that you are really trying to determine as we know that most of the schools in APS have a predominately African American student population?  It would only make sense that most of the valedictorians are African American.

ErnestB
ErnestB

@weetamoe @Starik @Wrecker @ErnestB @BurroughstonBroch


If these prospective students are good enough for Georgia Tech, they are good enough for me.  It's Georgia Tech’s money and they can use it how they like.  Their definition of merit is the one that counts.

While a good score on a standardized test can be a good indicator of probable student success in college, nothing is guaranteed.   Standardized test scores matter more to some colleges than others.  We don’t know how much Georgia Tech uses this in their evaluation of the student candidate to award the APS scholarship.  Why should it matter to anyone else?

ErnestB
ErnestB

@Starik @ErnestB @weetamoe @Wrecker @BurroughstonBroch


I thought scholarship money comes from annual Roll Call efforts with alumni.  Should taxpayers care about that?


Do you have an issue with this merit scholarship program?  How about the ML King, Jr. scholarship at Emory which is for APS graduates?

ErnestB
ErnestB

@Starik @ErnestB @weetamoe @Wrecker @BurroughstonBroch


I'm glad to hear this!  Georgia Tech is providing a scholarship as an incentive for those who would qualify to attend, not just because they were a valedictorian.  Again it is the students' choice as to whether they accept the scholarship as they probably have offers from other great colleges.


I read that Georgia Tech offered 38 scholarships to the Vals and Sals in the APS class of 2014 (19 HSs).  Of that, 13 accepted giving a rate of just over 33%.  Is that the kind of information you were looking for in your first post?

BurroughstonBroch
BurroughstonBroch

It would be interesting to know what percentage of APS graduates who enter Tech actually graduate.